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AP Lit: Week 3 (Setting and POV)

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Josh Aldrich

on 19 September 2013

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Transcript of AP Lit: Week 3 (Setting and POV)

Welcome to
AP Literature!
september 16-20, 2013
Grading Your Own
the one about the mysterious glowing cloud
Now, swap essays within your groups.
Grade your partner's essay on a scale of 1-9. Write down at least 2-3 bullet points explaining your rating.
You will turn in the essays at the end of the hour.
Journal #6
What sensory details does Cecil use to describe Night Vale? Please identify three or four details or phrases that you think are the most interesting or descriptive and identify the mood that they create.
What are the "rules" of Night Vale? In other words, what kind of things do you think can happen in this town? What is probable and improbable? How do you know?
What is Cecil's relationship to his setting? What can we infer about him (and the town) from this broadcast?
What is the mood that the creators of the radio show want you to feel as you listen? How do they go about creating this mood?
Rule Setting
Rule Setting
Monday
Setting "sets" or determines rules, constraints and possibilities, potential conflicts, and possible consequences
Warm-up
Read through the sample responses from the 2009 AP essay to which you responded on Tuesday.
For each essay, please assign a rating on a scale from 1-9. A generic rubric will be provided to you.
When you are finished, pair off into groups of 3 to discuss your ratings. As a group, come up with a consensus score for each essay.
Often, point of view is reduced to a simple discussion about first person and third person. But it's really much more than that.
Identify the character that you would like to use for the "Good Man" rewrite assignment.
Before you begin writing, please complete a Values Profile for your chosen character.
After you have numbered each of the "values," identify your character's top three values and explain your reasoning.
Include quotes and relevant details in your explanation.
Values Profile
Journal #4
In what ways are you a creature of your environment? In other words, do you think that you would be the same person if you lived in Texas? London? India?
In what ways would you be different? In what ways would you be the same?
How do you change when you are around different groups of people? How can you know your "one true self"?
What is Setting?
Setting is physical.
Wellspring Preparatory High School
Setting is temporal.
It is September 13, 2013.
Setting is also SOCIAL and PSYCHOLOGICAL.
Physical and temporal settings are the same no matter the mood, personality, or behaviors of the characters.
Social/Psychological
The social/psychological dimensions of setting can be described as the HUMAN DIMENSION.
Social/Psychological settings are dependent upon the mood, personality, or behaviors of the characters.
So...what does that look like?
The setting of this classroom is different if the students are angry and stressed as opposed to calm and relaxed. Same place, different setting.
Levels of Setting
Within any story, there are different levels of setting.
Macro: the big picture
Earth, Europe, France, the 20th century, the Renaissance
Meso: in between
Paris, Wellspring Prep, 1990s, last year
Micro: zoomed in detail
Your locker, your desk, June 12, 1954, this very second.
The Scream & La Loge
Nighthawks
Exit Plan
Please post your two "Nighthawks" poems in the appropriate Moodle forum by 11:59 PM on Sunday evening.
We will finish our setting analysis with film and the podcast "Welcome to Nightvale" on Monday.
On Tuesday, we will write our first AP style essay about setting before beginning our study of Point of View
Bedroom at Arles
Many poets have used Edward Hopper's painting "Nighthawks" as inspiration for their poems. I would like you to do the same. In no less than 15 lines apiece, please write two free-verse poems about the scene at the diner. Post your poems in the Moodle forum by 11:59 PM on Sunday.
Who are these people? Why are they there? What are they like? What city are they in? Do they know each other? What year is it? What are the characters wants or desires?
The Scream & La Loge
Bedroom at Arles
Nighthawks
Many poets have used Edward Hopper's painting "Nighthawks" as inspiration for their poems. I would like you to do the same. In no less than 15 lines apiece, please write two free-verse poems about the scene at the diner. Post your poems in the Moodle forum by 11:59 PM on Sunday.
Who are these people? Why are they there? What are they like? What city are they in? Do they know each other? What year is it? What are the characters wants or desires?
Exit Plan
Please post your two "Nighthawks" poems in the appropriate Moodle forum by 11:59 PM tonight.
We will finish our setting analysis with film and the podcast "Welcome to Night Vale" on Tuesday
We will also write our first AP style essay about setting before beginning our study of Point of View.
There are also genre-specific rules of setting.
Instead of attempting a story of the United States in the distant future, focus your story on a small, micro setting that allows the audience to engage (e.g. I Am Legend)
Rules of specificity and limitation can also help reader and writer alike.
Fans of Doctor Who know that, while the Doctor can infinitely regenerate when fatally wounded, he can also die by being killed during regeneration.
Readers of Harry Potter or Redwall can tell you in the most articulate terms what is or isn't allowed in the fantasy universe.
If a story is set in Ada in the year 2013, it is unlikely that there will be a gang shootout in the streets.
AP Essay
Take the next 45 minutes to read and respond to the essay prompt from the 2009 AP Lit Exam.
Consider personification (granting human attributes to inanimate objects) and figurative language (simile, metaphor, etc.)
We will look at sample responses from the 2009 exam after everyone has finished.
Introduction to POV

We have to be alert for the status of the narrator - that is, the extent to which the narrator is credible.
Speaker vs. the Message
When evaluating narrators, we need to consider the narrator's relationship to the message being sent. We evaluate this through three factors: status, contact, and stance.
Status
Here are the spectra we use to evaluate the status (authority) of a narrator
Equal to author
Separated from author
Uninvolved
Fully involved
Omniscient
Humanly limited
Completely reliable
Totally

unreliable
Contact
The second critical factor in evaluating a narrator is the narrator's relationship with the audience.
What is the narrator's attitude toward the audience?
Respect
Contempt
Stance
Finally, we must evaluate the narrator's attitude toward the content of the narrator.
For example: "William was mugged" vs. "William got himself mugged" vs. "William was stupid enough to wander around alone South Division at 3 AM, so it's his own fault that he was mugged."
Clear Attitude
Hidden Attitude
Approval
Disapproval
Rating Reliability
The following vignettes will give you practice in evaluating whether a narrator is reliable or unreliable. Read through each of the scenes carefully and then discuss the questions following each story with your group.
Analyzing Narrators in Music
Tomorrow, we are going to study narrators in music. We'll start with a couple of classic case studies: The Police's "Every Breath You Take" and Eminem's "97 Bonnie and Clyde". And some Death Cab/Mountain Goats for good measure.
I would also like you to bring in the lyrics of two songs: one that seems to be from the artist's perspective and one that you're pretty sure isn't.
If the narrator isn't credible, we have to reconstruct the narrative, basing our reconstruction on what's not under dispute in the work and on our knowledge of the world.
If the author seems to want us to believe the narrator, than we have to ascertain just how we feel about the narrator's judgments; that is, we have to decide if we want to embrace or resist them.
We have to recognize when the narrator's judgments are explicit and when we have to infer them.
If the narrator seems to look up to or down on us, we have to ask how we feel about that.
If the narrator treats us as equals, we have to consider whether that's a club we want to be a part of. Think of the coworker who wants you to laugh at his racist jokes.
We have to be alert for how the narrator regards us (is the narrator condescending?)
First of all, we need to sort out how closely the narrator of a given story is aligned with the author and how worthy of our trust the narrator is.
Holden Caulfield is a classic unreliable narrator.
Remember, the author and the narrator are rarely the same thing. This can especially trip up readers when analyzing poetry.
Full transcript