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Sustainability: Residential Colleges

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Thomas Rokholt

on 5 March 2014

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Transcript of Sustainability: Residential Colleges

What to do with your waste:
Sustainable Yale
Your guide to more sustainable living at the Yale Residential Colleges
Energy
Waste
Food & Laundry
People
Materials
Earth
As a member of the Yale community, your contribution to Yale's sustainability efforts are essential to the University's success in achieving the goals of the Yale Sustainability Strategic Plan.
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Yale's Sustain-
ability Strategic
Plan sets a
campus-wide
goal to reduce
greenhouse gas
emissions to 10% below 1990 levels by 2020, a 43% reduction from 2005 levels.
Energy
Computers and Other Electronics
Purchase Energy Star- or EPEAT-rated electronics.

Adjust the settings on your computer to send your monitor sleep quicker and use computing power more efficiently.
How to help:
Energy
Reduce Vampire Power
Americans waste $10 billion of electricity
per year by leaving chargers, appliances, and other electronics plugged in when not in use.
Shut down your computer at night.
Unplug chargers when they're not in use.
Flip the 'off' switch on surge protectors over breaks.
Turn on your printer only when you need it; unplug it when you're not using it.
Buy Smarter
Manage Better
Visit the Technology Troubleshooting Office on the lower level of Bass Library for help adjusting your computer.
Energy
Can save you up to $50 over their lifetime!
Use 75% less energy and can last 10 times as long.
Don't Forget to Turn out the Light!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standby_power
Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
Follow safety precautions if one breaks:

Talk to your College's Sustainability Service Corps representative about disposal after use.
http://www.epa.gov/cfl/cflcleanup.html
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/promotions/change_light/downloads/Fact_Sheet_Mercury.pdf
Energy
Temperature Management
Shut windows during cold weather to prevent energy waste.
Keep blinds closed at night to keep the room warm.
Turn down your radiator instead of opening a window (1 is coldest, 9 is warmest).
Be patient—radiators take a few minutes to adjust to new settings!
If you have any questions, contact your facilities superintendent:
http://www.facilities.yale.edu/publications/FacSuperMap.pdf
Getting Around
Navigate New Haven car free.
http://to.yale.edu/car-free
Shuttles
Wednesday nights, check here:
http://www.yale.edu/oiss/life/practical/shopping/shuttles.html
YCC-Stop & Shop
weekend shuttle:
leaves hourly from Phelps Gate 8:35 am to 5:35 pm,
leaves hourly from Stop & Shop 9:05 am to 6:05 pm.
Yale Shuttle Lines
http://to.yale.edu/shuttle
http://yale.transloc.com/info/mobile
Learn More:
Mobile:
Zipcar
Yale has over 30 Zipcars available for students, faculty, and staff, and has partnered with Zipcar to offer discounted yearly memberships.
Zipcars are ideal for short trips and errands, and eliminate your need for a car on campus.
Going Home
If you can, consider taking the train for visits home.
With Amtrak, you can skip traffic on the way to the airport and on I-91 and I-95.
Universal Waste
Universal waste includes compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs), computers, electronics, chargers, and non alkaline batteries.
On average, Yale EHS recycles approximately 200,000 pounds of used electronics each year
Waste
Recycling & Waste Diversion
Yale's Sustainability Strategic Plan sets a goal to achieve a 50% waste diversion rate through reuse, recycling and composting strategies by June 30, 2016.
Single Stream
Yale recycling is single stream—all paper, metal, plastics, and glass go in the same bin.
Rinse your food containers of food residue! If it's not rinsed, it may not be recycled! (and it will make your room smell...)
If your residential college is missing a recycling bin, please call or email the Central Customer Service Center:
(203) 432-6888
centralcsc@yale.edu
http://recycling.yale.edu
What paper can be recycled, you ask?
...almost everything: magazines, milk cartons, envelopes, and sticky notes—even paperclips and staples.
Cardboard boxes should be flattened and stacked next to a recycling bin for proper recycling.
Almost everything... But not these!
tissues
food-soiled paper (e.g. pizza boxes, used paper plates
wax paper
food residue
What about plastic, glass, and metals?
All plastics (except plastic wrap) can be recycled—even Solo Cups
Lids can be recycled, but must be removed from their containers
The following are NOT recyclable:
styrofoam
plastic wraps or bags
light bulbs (including CFLs)
food residue (remember to rinse!)
ceramics
Because styrofoam cannot be recycled, remember to remove it from your cardboard boxes when recycling them

You can also donate your packing peanuts for reuse by bringing them to the post office
Paper Purchasing
Yale's Sustainability Strategic Plan sets a goal to achieve a fifteen percent reduction in paper purchases and ten percent reduction in office supply purchases from 2013 levels by June 30, 2016.
Reduce Consumption
If you stacked all the reams of paper consumed by Yale in one year, the stack would reach 30,415 feet. That's taller than Mount Everest!
The 2013-2016 Strategic Plan goal is to reduce paper purchases by 10% below 2013 levels by June 2016.
By reaching this goal we would save approximately 3,500 trees, equivalent to a forest area twice the size of Old Campus.
Check it
http://sustainability.yale.edu/tools-resources/posters-fact-sheets/paper
http://sustainability.yale.edu/tools-resources/posters-fact-sheets/disposal
Purchase Recycled Paper
What difference does it make?
Yale has a university-wide policy of purchasing printing and copy paper with a minimum of 30% post-consumer recycled content, and you should too!
For every ton of 30% recycled-content paper used at Yale instead of virgin paper:
For every ton of 100% recycled-content paper used at Yale instead of virgin paper:
7
632
2,625
Yale would save:
trees,
pounds of carbon dioxide,
and gallons of water.
24
2,108
8,750
Printing Suggestions to Reduce Waste
Print double Sided (duplex),
Print 2-up (two small pages per sheet of paper),
Read on-screen instead of printing a hard copy,
Convert one-sided pages to two sided copies,
Try EcoFont, which uses 25% less ink than regular fonts,
Select draft-level quality when possible.
http://www.ecofont.com/en/products/green/font/download-the-ink-saving-font.html
How many paper napkins or paper towels do you use every day? Using reusable goods— like sponges for cleaning, and cloth napkins for eating—saves trees and significantly reduces the amount of waste you personally generate.
When purchasing necessary paper goods, such as facial tissues and bath tissue paper, look for products made from 100% recycled material
Cooking & Cleaning
When purchasing cleaning supplies, look for products that are biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-petroleum-based.
Cooking and Cleaning
Common green-cleaning brands include Seventh Generation, Biokleen, and Mrs. Meyers Clean Day.
Green Cleaning at Yale
More info at: http://www.facilities.yale.edu/publications/GreenCleaning.pdf
Yale continually strives to improve the health and safety of its students and workers while reducing its environmental impact.
Whenever possible, Yale uses Green Seal-certified or
-recommended products. If one is not available, Yale selects a product that is environmentally friendly and safe as determined by Yale Environmental Health and Safety.
Laundry
Be sure to run
only full loads of laundry to
avoid wasting water (and money!)
Wash your clothing on the cold cycle, or
use the warm cycle for heavily soiled clothing. Avoid using the hot cycle, which uses a significant amount of energy to heat the water.
Hang drying clothes saves energy (and
money!)and will also maintain their
condition better than
the dryer.
To avoid unnecessary rinse cycles, only use two
tablespoons of detergent. Buy detergent that is
plant-based, biodegradable, & phosphate-free.
A
dirty
lint
screen can
decrease a
dryer's efficiency
by 30%. If you must
use the dryer, clean the lint screen before EACH load.
Reuse Ideas
Does your library have a
Pen Pail? Instead of
throwing away old pens
and pencils, put them to
good use by donating
them to TerraCycle,
which collects old wri-
ting instruments for recycling or reuse. Talk to your SSC coordinator to request one.
On your way to the
buttery? Cut down on
waste by bringing reusable dishes, thermoses, utensils, and napkins with you,
rather than disposable
goods.
Reuse
Reduce
Cooking
Trayless Dining
Why go trayless?
Regardless of how messy a returned tray is, each used tray gets put in a dishwasher, which uses an average of 1/3 of a gallon of water per tray.
In some dining halls, the dishwashers can only fit three trays, so they must be run multiple times to clean all the trays, requiring much more than this amount
Large trays encourage diners to fill up trays on the first trip, rather than taking the amount of food they need. Waste with trays can be up to 150% of the trayless waste per person.
Your food choices affect your water usage as well: skipping meat just one day a week saves 3,700 gallons of water per person each week. That's enough to fill 12 hot tubs.
Composting
All dining halls at Yale compost food waste!
Uneaten food waste is collected in a 65-gallon bin. For pick-up, the food is transferred to corn-starch bags, which are placed outside the dining halls.
Six days a week, Yale picks up these bags and transports them to a composting facility in Connecticut
The end result is nutrient-rich soil that is sold to compost retailers. Instead of being burned, your food waste is turned back into a useful soil product.
Did you know? Yale delivers approximately 70 tons of food waste per month to be composted.
Water Conservation
It takes three liters of water
to produce one liter of bottled water.
The energy required to produce and transport one bottle of water can be as high as the equivalent of filling a plastic bottle 1/4 full of oil
Rather than purchasing bottled water, carry a reusable water bottle with you during the
day and refill it at drinking fountains
or refillable water stations. Help the
planet AND save money!
New Haven tap
water is perfectly safe.
Studies nationwide have consistently shown that tap water is as safe as,
or safer than,
bottled water.
BK
Berkeley College
was constructed between 1933-34
and was designed by James Gamble Rogers
(Class of 1889).
In 1999, the college was completely renovated. The
renovations incorporated many sustainable features
Renewed external building envelope to improve thermal efficiency, while still preserving the historic stone façade.
Reused existing wood flooring and wooden doors, and much of the existing roof slate.
Natural fiber carpets installed, and low-VOC materials used wherever possible.
Replaced and augmented attic in-sulation, further improving the building's thermal efficiency.
Natural light exposure was improved through new insulated skylights and light wells, reducing the need for electric lighting.
BR
CC
DC
ES
JE
MC
PC
SY
SM
TD
TC
Branford College was constructed
between 1917 and 1922 and was designed by
James Gamble Rogers (class of 1889).
Branford was completely renovated in 1998. The renovations incorporated many sustainable features.
The basement floor was lowered to create room for program areas, barring the need for a larger building footprint.
Installed variable speed drives and controls on hot water heating pumps to conserve energy
Premium efficiency motors were installed on pumps and fans, making them less energy intensive
Separate heating hot water systems for residential and kitchen areas allow scheduled operation setbacks
Water-saving plumbing fixtures were added, along with light controls such as dimmers and occupancy sensors
Calhoun College was
first established in 1933 and
completely renovated in 2009.
Though the university had not yet formulated
its Sustainable Design Requirements, the
renovations incorporated many
sustainable features.
All new appliances purchased are ENERGY STAR compliant.
Occupancy sensors were installed to reduce unnecessary lighting use.
Energy-efficient fluorescent lighting replaced incandescent lighting.
The inefficient steel-framed windows were replaced with new double-glazed windows.
Materials with high
levels of recycled content were incorporated into the project, including countertop materials and toilet partitions.
Click on your college's initials to zoom in. Move around by clicking and dragging, or click on the borders of a shape to zoom to it.
Davenport College was originally
designed by James Gamble Rogers (Class
of 1889) in 1930.
The college was completely renovated in 2005. Though the university had not yet formulated its Sustainable Design Requirements yet, the renovations incorporated
many sustainable features.
Old, unused basement spaces were reclaimed and converted into new social/recreational facilities
To increase natural light penetration and air circulation, new openings were carefully inserted throughout the foundation.
When possible, roof flashing was salvaged and reused.
All windows are operable, encourag-
ing the use of natural ventilation
The inefficient steam heating system was replaced with a superior, better insulated hot water radiation system.
The original steel windows were re-placed with leaded glass, given internal storm panels, and double-glazed, greatly improving the thermal seal of the building.
Natural-finished materials were used whenever possible
The original Ezra Stiles College
was designed by Eero Saarinen, who also
designed the Yale Whale. The college was built
from 1961-1962.
Ezra Stiles was completely renovated in 2010, incorporating many sustainable features.
Existing materials were reused as much as possible, with any new materials selected for low-VOC and recycled content.
Energy-efficient lighting throughout the college, including the installation of overhead lighting in student bedrooms, negating the need for less-efficient task lighting.
Water features were added in the courtyards to catch stormwater runoff and reuse it for the fountains. Water is also conserved by the use of dual-flush toilets and waterless urinals.
Occupancy sensors were installed throughout the building to turn off lighting in unoccupied spaces.
The inefficient
heating system
was replaced
with a user-controlled system that allows students to monitor room temperatures.
Skylights were added to the Common Room to increase daylight.
Jonathan Edwards College
was first established in 1932 and com-
pletely renovated in 2008, incorporating
many sustainable features:
All residential areas and most assembly spaces have access to operable windows for daylight and outside air.
All adhesives, sealants, and paints used are low-VOC.
Energy-efficient fluorescent lighting replaced incandescent lighting.
Double-glazed windows were installed to better insulate the building.
The heating system was redesigned for efficiency.
Occupancy sensors were installed throughout the building to turn off lighting in unoccupied spaces.
Nearly 100% of the existing building shell, including exterior masonry walls, most exterior wood doors, and most of the roof structure, was maintained or restored.
Additional areas in the courtyard were planted to improve stormwater management.
New wood materials are formaldehyde-free.
The original Morse College was
designed in 1959 by Eero Saarinen, who
also designed the Yale Whale.
Morse College was completely renovated
from 2009-2011, incorporating many
sustainable features:
Existing materials were reused as much as possible, with any new materials selected for low-VOC and recycled content.
Energy-efficient lighting throughout the college, including the installation of overhead lighting in student bedrooms, negating the need for less-efficient task lighting.
Water features were added in the courtyards to catch stormwater runoff and reuse it for the fountains. Water is also conserved by the use of dual-flush toilets and waterless urinals.
Occupancy sensors were installed throughout the building to turn off lighting in unoccupied spaces.
The inefficient heating system was replaced with a user-controlled system that allows students to monitor room temperatures.
Skylights were added to the Common Room to increase daylight.
Computers must have hard drive erased—contact ITS for instructions.
Each college has a technoscrap and Universal Waste bin located near the Master's office.
Recycling
Trash
Technoscrap and Universal Waste
Paper




Metal & Glass
Plastics

Magazines, milk cartons, envelopes, and sticky notes— even paperclips and staples
Cardboard boxes (should be flattened and stacked next to a recycling bin)
NO wax paper, tissues, food residue, or food-soiled paper
Single-Stream Bin
All plastics except plastic wrap
Including lids, once removed from containers
NO styrofoam, light bulbs, plastic wraps or bags, ceramics, or food residue
Trash Bin
Batteries
each must be placed in an individual plastic baggie per DOT requirements
Cell Phones
Computers

must have hard drive erased—contact ITS for instructions
Electronic Devices
not all electronic devices—only those holding or transmitting data or used for entertainment
NO microwaves, hot plates, fans, toasters, lamps
Printers
Fluorescent Lamps, including CFLs

Bin located near Master's Office
http://recycling.yale.edu/
Plastic Bags
Alkaline Batteries

(non-Alkaline)
For further information, click here:
http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?a=2718&q=325496&depNav_GID=1653&depNav=%7C
Use your keyboard's arrow keys to advance and go back!
Pierson College was
originally designed by James
Gamble Rogers (Class of 1889) and finished construction in 1933.
The college was completely renovated in 2004, incorporating many sustainable features.
Existing wood flooring, wood doors, hardware, plaster partitions, and ceilings were reused as much as possible.
Old, unused basement spaces were re-claimed and converted into new social/ recreational facilities.
To increase natural light penetration and air cir-culation, new openings were carefully inserted throughout the foundation.
When possible, roof flashing was salvaged and reused.
All windows are operable, encouraging the use of natural ventilation.
The inefficient steam heating system was replaced with a superior, better-insulated hot water radiation system.
Natural-finished materials were used whenever possible.
Saybrook College was
originally designed by James Gamble
Rogers (Class of 1889) and finished
construction in 1933.
The college was completely renovated from
2001-2002, incorporating many
sustainable features.
The basement floor was lowered to create room for program areas, barring the need for a larger building footprint.
Installed variable speed drives and controls on hot water heating pumps to conserve energy.
Premium efficiency motors were installed on pumps and fans, making them less energy intensive
Separate heating hot water systems for residential and kitchen areas allow scheduled operation setbacks
Water-saving plumbing fixtures were added, along with light controls such as dimmers and occupancy sensors
Silliman first opened in
1940, and was the last of the original
ten residential colleges to be completed.
The college was completely renovated from
2006-2007, incorporating many
sustainable features.
Natural-finished materials were used whenever possible.
Existing residential windows were refurbished, with an interior glass panel added to improve thermal performance.
Addition of new insulated windows provides natural light in basement spaces previously without access to daylight.
By converting existing unused attic spaces into bedrooms and common rooms, residential density was increased.
Installation of efficiency motors on pumps and fans, energy efficient lights and ballasts, and water saving plumbing fixtures.
The inefficient steam heating system was replaced with a superior, better-insulated hot water radiation system.
Existing wood flooring, wood doors, wood wall finishes, plaster partitions, and ceiling materials were reused as much as possible.
Wooden shutters were replaced with rolling shades to maximize daylight penetration.
Timothy Dwight
was designed in 1935 by James
Gamble Rogers (Class of 1889).
The college was completely renovated
in 2002, incorporating many
sustainable features.
The inefficient steam heating system was replaced with a superior, better-insulated hot water radiation system.
Interior finishes are low-VOC to protect indoor air quality.
Building thermal performance was improved by adding insulation to previously uninsulated areas and installing double-glazed windows.
Occupancy sensors were installed throughout the building to reduce lighting use.
Low-flow faucets, showerheads, and toilets were installed to conserve water.
Thermostats were installed to provide individual control of student rooms.
Existing woodwork was modified, repaired, or refinished rather than replaced with new materials.
Trumbull College
was designed by James Gamble
Rogers (Class of 1889) and was
established in 1932.
Trumbull College was completely
renovated in 2006, incorporating
many sustainable features.
The old, inefficient steam heating system was re-placed with a superior, better-insulated hot water radiation system.
Highly durable, low-maintenance materials were used as much as possible, such as the brick in the basement and the stone and wood throughout the building.
Historic, interior common spaces such as the Dining Hall, Common Room, and Library were rehabilitated rather than re-placed, preserving the high-quality original workmanship.
Low-flow faucets, showerheads, and toilets were installed to conserve water.
Occupancy sensors were installed to reduce energy use in common areas.
Existing woodwork was modified, re-paired, or refinished rather than replaced with new materials
Reuse Ideas
Donate your old clothing to the Eli Exchange—or swap for some new. You can bring unwanted clothing, shoes, or items like books. Make sure whatever you bring is clean and in usable condition (no old socks or underwear)!!!
Links and Phone Numbers
Yale Office of Sustainability

Yale Office of Facilities

Facilities Superintendents

Yale Recycling Page

CT Recycling Guidelines


Central Customer Service Center

Yale Transport Options

Zagster Bike Share Program

Yale Community Carbon Fund Calculator

Sustainability Service Corps Projects


Sustainability Service Corps Members
http://sustainability.yale.edu.edu/

http://facilities.yale.edu

http://www.facilities.yale.edu/publications/FacSuperMap.pdf

http://recycling.yale.edu/

http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?a=2718&q=325496&depNav_GID=1653&depNav=%7C

(203) 432-6888

http://to.yale.edu/

http://www.zagster.com/yale

http://yccf.sustainability.yale.edu/

http://sustainability.yale.edu/sustainability-service-corps-projects

http://sustainability.yale.edu/sustainability-service-corps
Did you know
that a flight from
Connecticut to
Argentina emits 4,180 pounds
of carbon dioxide? That's almost 10 percent of the average American's annual carbon emissions!
committed to promoting the balance
of People, Planet and Prosperity
within the Yale College experience.
The group consists of four teams: the
promotes waste min-
imization in the Colleges and at events,
the works toward
energy awareness and conser-
vation,
ensure that events across Yale meet
sustainable event standards set by the Office of Sustainability and the represent each residential college implementing Yale College-wide sustainability initiatives and specific sustainability projects for
The Sustainability Service Corps is
each residential college.
Compost Crew
Energy Squad
Green Events Consultants
College Sustainability Coordinators
http://sustainability.yale.edu/sustainability-service-corps
Check them out here:
Click and drag to move around freely (and zoom in and out with your scroll wheel or the side buttons). If you ever get lost, just hit one of your keyboard's arrow keys to go back to the presentation.
http://to.yale.edu/zipcar
Stop & Shop Shuttle
Zagster Bikes
Zagster is a bike share program with bikes located across campus
Bikes can be reserved online, or via text message from the bike rack.
The closest Zagster location to the Residential Colleges is in front of Sterling Memorial Library
Become a member at
http://www.zagster.com/yale
Did You Know?
If you register for the Yale Bicycle Safety class offered through Yale Environmental Health & Safety, you will be reimbursed for the $20 “Zagster” membership fee, learn safe urban cycling skills, and get a free helmet!
Full transcript