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IMPRESSIONIST

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rheynald bautista

on 11 March 2014

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Transcript of IMPRESSIONIST

IMPRESSIONIST
PAINTERS and THEIR WORKS

Self-Portrait, 1878
Alphard Buenaventura
Rashina Tuazon
Karla Espiritu
Sarah Jane Penaverde
Marjan Verzosa
Reynaldo Bautista
Audrey Lingling
Nigel Sisante

Presentation by:
Armand Guillaumin
Sunset at Ivry
La Place Valhubert, 1875
Hollow in the Snow, 1869
The Seine, 1867
Armand Guillaumin (February 16, 1841 - June 26, 1927), was a French impressionist painter and lithographer. Born Jean-Baptiste Armand Guillaumin in Paris, France, he worked at his uncle's lingerie shop while attending evening drawing lessons. He also worked for a French government railway before studying at the Académie Suisse in 1861. There, he met Paul Cézanne and Camille Pissarro with whom maintained lifelong friendships. While he never achieved the stature of these two, his influence on their work was significant. Cézanne attempted his first etching based on Guillaumin paintings of barges on the River Seine.
Noted for their intense colours, Guillamin's paintings are represented in major museums around the world. He is best remembered for his landscapes of Paris, the Creuse département, and the area around Les Adrets-de-l'Estérel near the Mediterraneran coast in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of France.
Mary Stevenson Cassatt


Mary Stevenson Cassatt (/kəˈsæt/; May 22, 1844 – June 14, 1926) was an American painter and printmaker. She lived much of her adult life in France, where she first befriended Edgar Degas and later exhibited among the Impressionists.


• Cassatt often created images of the social and private lives of women, with particular emphasis on the intimate bonds between mothers and children.


• She was born into an upper-middle-class family

• Though her family objected to her becoming a professional artist, Cassatt began studying painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia at the early age of 15

• Part of her parents' concern may have been Cassatt's exposure to feminist ideas and the bohemian behavior of some of the male students. Although about 20 percent of the students were female, most viewed art as a socially valuable skill; few of them were determined, as Cassatt was, to make art their career.
• Part of her parents' concern may have been Cassatt's exposure to feminist ideas and the bohemian behavior of some of the male students. Although about 20 percent of the students were female, most viewed art as a socially valuable skill; few of them were determined, as Cassatt was, to make art their career.
• Cassatt admired Degas, whose pastels had made a powerful impression on her when she encountered them in an art dealer's window in 1875. "I used to go and flatten my nose against that window and absorb all I could of his art," she later recalled. "It changed my life. I saw art then as I wanted to see it."
• Cassatt's popular reputation is based on an extensive series of rigorously drawn, tenderly observed, yet largely unsentimental paintings and prints on the theme of the mother and child.

Paintings by Mary Cassatt
Self-portrait by Mary Cassatt, c. 1878, gouache on paper, 23⅝ × 16 3/16 in
Nurse reading to a girl, 1895
Child in a straw hat, 1886
Jules Being Dried by His Mother, 1900
Lilacs in a window 1997
After The Bath, 1901
Woman with a Pearl Necklace in a Loge, 1879
Mother and two children, 1906
Summertime, 1894
Summertime, 1894
The caress, 1902
Edgar Degas
Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917), born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (pronounced [ilɛʀ ʒɛʁmɛ̃ ɛdɡɑʀ dœˈɡɑ]), was a French artist famous for his work in painting, sculpture, printmaking and drawing. He is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism although he rejected the term, and preferred to be called a realist. A superb draughtsman, he is especially identified with the subject of the dance, and over half his works depict dancers. These display his mastery in the depiction of movement, as do his racecourse subjects and female nudes. His portraits are considered to be among the finest in the history of art.
Early in his career, his ambition was to be a history painter, a calling for which he was well prepared by his rigorous academic training and close study of classic art. In his early thirties he changed course, and by bringing the traditional methods of a history painter to bear on contemporary subject matter, he became a classical painter of modern life.
Paintings by Edgar Degas
Title: Blue Dancers, c.1899
Painted by: Edgar Degas
Location: Pushkin Museum, Moscow, Russia
Year: 1899
Dimensions: 25.59 inch wide x 25.59 inch high
Orientation: Landscape

Ecole de Danse -School of Dance
The Absinthe Drinker
The Cotton Exchange in New Orleans
Portrait of a Lady in Grey


Ecole de Danse -School of Dance

Oscar-Claude Monet
Oscar-Claude Monet (1840-1926) is a famous French painter and one of the founders of the Impressionism movement along with his friends Renoir, Sisley and Bazille.

Monet rejected the traditional approach to landscape painting and instead of copying old masters he had been learning from his friends and the nature itself. Monet observed variations of color and light caused by the daily or seasonal changes.

Claude Monet was born on November 14, 1840 on the fifth floor of 45 rue Laffitte,in the ninth arrondissement of Paris. He was the second son Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise-Justine Aubree. On the first of April 1851, Monet entered the Le Havre secondary school of the arts. He became known locally for this charcoal caricatures, which he would sell for ten to twenty francs. Monet also undertook his first drawing lessons from Jacques-Francois Ochard, a former student of Jacques-Louis David.
On the beaches of Normandy in about 1856/1857 he meet fellow artist Eugéne Boudin who became his mentor and taught him to use oil paints. Boudin taught Monet "en plein air" (outdoor) techniques for painting.
Paintings by Claude Monet
 A Pathway in Monet's Garden, 1902
The Rue Montorgueil, Paris 1878
The Cliffs at Etretat, 1855
The Cliff Walk at Pourville, 1882
Claude Monet, The Bridge at Argenteuil, 1874
Impression, Sunrise,  1872–1872
Fisherman's Cottage on the Cliffs at Varengeville, 1822
Bridge over a Pool of Water Lilies, 1899
Houses of Parliament, London, Sun Breaking Through the Fog, 1904
Norvegienne, 1887
The Boat Studio, 1876
Study of a Figure Outdoors - Woman with a Parasol, facing left, 1886
Young Girls in a Row Boat, 1887
waterloo bridge III, 1904
Gustav Calliebotte
(French: [ɡystav kɑjbɔt]; 19 August 1848 – 21 February 1894) was a French painter, member and patron of the group of artists known as Impressionists, though he painted in a much more realistic manner than many other artists in the group. Caillebotte was noted for his early interest in photography as an art form.
Caillebotte was born at home on rue du Faubourg-Saint-Denis in Paris, and lived there until 1866 when his father had a home built on rue de Miromesnil. Beginning in 1860, the Caillebotte family began spending many of their summers in Yerres, a town on the Yerres River about 12 miles (20 km) south of Paris, where Martial Caillebotte, Sr. had purchased a large property. It was around this time that Caillebotte probably began to draw and paint.
Caillebotte's style belongs to the School of Realism but was strongly influenced by his Impressionist associates. In common with his precursors, Jean-François Millet and Gustave Courbet, as well his contemporary Degas, Caillebotte aimed to paint reality as it existed and as he saw it, hoping to reduce painting's inherent theatricality.
Caillebotte painted many domestic and familial scenes, interiors, and portraits. Many of his paintings depict members of his family; Young Man at his Window (Jeune Homme à la fenêtre) (1875) shows René in the home on rue de Miromesnil; The Orange Trees (Les orangers) (1878), depicts Martial Jr. and his cousin Zoë in the garden of the family property at Yerres; and Portraits in the Country (Portraits à la campagne) (1875) includes Caillebotte's mother along with his aunt, cousin, and a family friend.
Paintings by Gustave Caillebotte
Self Portrait, 1892
Les raboteurs de parquet, 1875
Young Man at his Window, 1876
Man at his Bath, Drying Himself, 1884-1894
Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877
Nude Lying on a Couch, 1873
The Yellow Fields at Gennevilliers, 1884
Nasturces, 1892
Berthe Morisot
(January 14, 1841 – March 2, 1895) was a painter and a member of the circle of painters in Paris who became known as the Impressionists. She was described by Gustave Geffroy in 1894 as one of "les trois grandes dames" of Impressionism alongside Marie Bracquemond and Mary Cassatt.
In 1864, she exhibited for the first time in the highly esteemed Salon de Paris. Sponsored by the government, and judged by academicians, the Salon was the official, annual exhribition of the Académie des beaux-arts in Paris. Her work was selected for exhibition in six subsequent Salon until, in 1874, she joined the "rejected" Impressionists in the first of their own exhibitions, which included Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley.
Born January 14, 1841, in Bourges, France. Berthe Morisot's father was a high-ranking government official and her grandfather was the influential Rococo painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard. She and her sister Edma began painting as young girls. Despite the fact that as women they were not allowed to join official arts institutions, the sisters earned respect in art circles for their talent.
Although traditionally Manet has been related as the master and Morisot as the follower, there is evidence that their relationship was a reciprocating one. Morisot had developed her own distinctive artistic style. Records of paintings show Manet's appreciation of certain stylistic and compositional decisions that Morisot originated. He incorporated some of these characteristics into his own work.
Morisot painted what she experienced on a daily basis. Her paintings reflect the 19th-century cultural restrictions of her class and gender. She avoided urban and street scenes as well as the nude figure and, like her fellow female Impressionist Mary Cassatt, focused on domestic life and portraits in which she could use family and personal friends as models. Paintings like The Cradle (1872), in which she depicted current trends for nursery furniture, reflect her sensitivity to fashion and advertising, both of which would have been apparent to her female audience. Her works also include landscapes, portraits, garden settings and boating scenes.



Paintings by Berthe Morisot
Hanging the Laundry out to Dry, 1875
Eugene Manet on the Isle of Wight,1875
Summer’s Day, 1879
The Cradle, 1872
On the balcony, 1871-1872
Grain Field, 1875
The Dining room, 1886
Reading, 1873
Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement that originated with a group of Paris-based artists. Their independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s, in spite of harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France. The name of the style derives from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which provoked the critic Louis Leroy to coin the term in a satirical review published in the Parisian newspaper Le Charivari.
In the middle of the 19th century—a time of change, as Emperor Napoleon III rebuilt Paris and waged war—the Académie des Beaux-Arts dominated French art. The Académie was the preserver of traditional French painting standards of content and style. Historical subjects, religious themes, and portraits were valued (landscape and still life were not), and the Académie preferred carefully finished images that looked realistic when examined closely. Colour was somber and conservative, and traces of brush strokes were suppressed, concealing the artist's personality, emotions, and working techniques.
CAMILLE PISSARO
(July 10, 1830 - November 13, 1903)
• was a French Impressionist painter.
• His importance resides not only in his visual contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, but also in his patriarchal standing among his colleagues, particularly Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin.

• Jacob-Abraham-Camille Pissarro was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, to Abraham Gabriel Pissarro, a Portuguese Sephardic Jew, and Rachel Manzana-Pomie, from the Dominican Republic.
• Relocating to Paris as a young man, Pissarro began experimenting with art, eventually helping to shape the Impressionist movement with friends including Claude Monet and Edgar Degas.
• Pissarro lived in St. Thomas until age 12, when he went to a boarding school in Paris. He returned to St. Thomas where he drew in his free time.
• Pissarro was attracted to political anarchy, an attraction that may have originated during his years in St. Thomas.
• In his later years, Pissarro suffered from a recurring eye infection that prevented him from working outdoors during much of the year. As a result of this disability, he often painted while looking out the window of a hotel room. Pissarro died in Paris on November 13, 1903, and is buried in Père Lachaise Cemetery.
Paintings by Camille Pissaro
Self Portrait, 1903
Bather in the woods, 1895
Felix at the age of seven, 1881
Children on a farm, 1887
Woman Bathing Her Feet in a Brook, 1894-1895
Paul Cezanne
(1839-1906)
One of the most influential artists in the history of twentieth-century painting and has inspired generations of modern artists.
Generally categorized as a Post-Impressionist, his unique method of building form with color and his analytical approach to nature influenced the art of Cubists, Fauvists, and successive generations of avant-garde artists.
Cezanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th century Impressionism and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. The line attributed to both Matisse and Picasso that Cezanne "is the father of us all" cannot be easily dismissed.
Cezanne's work demonstrates a mastery of design, colour, composition and draftsmanship. His often repetitive, sensitive and exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognisable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields, at once both a direct expression of the sensations of the observing eye and an abstraction from observed nature. The paintings convey Cezanne's intense study of his subjects, a searching gaze and a dogged struggle to deal with the complexity of human visual perception.
Paintings by Paul Cezanne
The Hanged Man's House, 1873
Pyramid of Skulls, 1901
Still life with basket, 1890
The Card players, 1890
Lac d'Annecy, 1896
The Large Bathers, 1906
The bather, 1885
The black marble clock, 1839
The Basket of Apples, 1893
THE END
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