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Customer Service

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by

Eric Storey

on 29 October 2014

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Transcript of Customer Service

Working in a state-of-the-art facility that is already set apart from others requires all staff to provide customers with a positive service experience:

We have to be superior at what we do
We have to create the community we have been talking about
We have to be models for what we want to see
We have to exemplify respect and understanding
Thank you!
Is it overrated?
No!
Tone of Voice
Stay committed to customer service that goes above and beyond, helping to continuously create the best Abilities Centre possible!
Customer Service
Going above & beyond
Creating a Positive Experience
The way to gain a good reputation, is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear.

-Socrates
"
"
We live in a world that loves instant gratification.

Negative experiences are quickly shared by customers to others.

Word of mouth is one of the best forms of advertisements!
2012 Facts
89% of consumers began doing business with a competitor following a poor customer experience
RightNow Customer Experience Impact Report 2011
Forrester Technographics Customer Experience Online Survey
86% of consumers will pay more for a better customer experience
24% of consumers who had unsatisfactory service interactions shared their experiences through social networks in 2010, a 50% increase since 2009
The Basics
Look the part: Presentation is everything!
Red carpet treatment: They are #1
Acknowledgment: Every person who comes and goes from the building
Personalized experience: We are creating a community
Resourceful: Don't have the answer? Find someone who does!
Support: We are here for our members
Listen: Ask for feedback, people want to be heard
Knowledgeable: What is going on at the centre, be up to date on any disruptions of services
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act
AODA Customer Service
Excellent customer service means treating people with:
dignity
integrity
equal opportunity
independence
It also means working towards eliminating any barriers:
structure or physical
information or communication
attitudinal
policy and procedure
Assistive Devices
Can include:
walkers
white canes
note taking devices

Permission is mandatory for moving, touching or handling any assistive device.

Inform the customer about other accessible features found in our facility.
Service Animals
NOT PETS!
They may accompany people with a variety of disabilities, such as:
vision loss
deaf, oral deaf, defended, hard of hearing
seizures
autism
mental/physical disabilities
many others
Support Persons
Variety of support persons may accompany our customers, such as:
personal support worker
volunteer
family member
friend
interpreters and intervenors
They may be helping with:
communication
mobility
personal care
access
Communication
What would you do?
Susan is deafblind, and has a support person with her.
She comes to you looking for help with membership prices.
Tips:
be prepared for customers to communicate with you the best way that they know how
remember to always talk to the customer directly and not to the support person
Doug has some hearing loss, he has a hearing aid that is visible to you.
He has approached you in search of another staff member.
What would you do?
Tips:
speak normally unless they ask you to speak slower or louder
if necessary, tap their shoulder to get their attention before speaking to them
make sure that you are in a well lit area, ensuring the customer can clearly see your face and read your lips
Jess is in a wheelchair and is having difficulty making it up the ramp.
What would you do?
Tips:
ask permission before touching any assistive devices, including wheel chairs
if given permission to assist in moving someone and their assistive device do not leave them in an awkward, dangerous, or undignified position
try to be at the same eye level, consider sitting in a chair
Keith has a white cane that helps him get around. He has been waiting for you in the atrium.
What would you do?
Tips:
do not assume they cannot see you
identify yourself when approaching them
offer to read any print materials
when giving directions or instructions make sure they are precise and descriptive
offer your arm to guide them if needed
Lesley has a speech impairment that causes difficulty when saying certain words. She has approached you looking for help.
What would you do?
Tips:
do not assume that they have another disability
when possible ask direct yes/no questions
be patient and do not interrupt
What would you do?
Kassandra is a regular at Abilities Centre. She has previously disclosed to you that she is learning to cope with schizophrenia. You can see her in the hall way seeming to be having a difficult time.
Tips:
be patient
treat the customer with dignity and respect
be calm, confident, and reassuring
ask them what the best way for you to help is
Tate has an intellectual disability. You have been given the opportunity to work with him during arts and crafts.
What would you do?
Tips:
do not make assumptions about what they can or cannot do
use plain language
provide one piece of information at a time
Tone of Voice at Abilities Centre
Our tone of voice is the way we write and speak; what we say and how we say it.

Focus on a consistent combination of being friendly, welcoming and supportive.

The more consistent we are as an organization, the more we will be recognized as an understanding, trusting and likable community that has been built on these four pillars.
sport
art
life skills
research
Friendly
Sounds as if you are talking to someone you have known for a while. Can be seen in verbal or written communication, without being formal and having a positive energy to it.


By listening first, and speaking from the heart we are able to show a genuine interest in the unique stories that every customer brings with them to our community.


No matter what position you hold at Abilities Centre you are always encouraged to laugh and enjoy every moment.
How does friendly sound?
Be conversational: Use every day language, no jargon or complicated terms

Break the rules: Grammar rules allow for little language creativity; use the language you want to achieve the intended impact

Show emotion: Speak from the heart, express our beliefs and commitment to being a welcoming inclusive environment

Reveal our fun side: When the moment is appropriate, be light-hearted while engaging with people, laugh a little
Welcoming
Just as you would welcome someone entering your home, every person that enters Abilities Centre needs to be made to feel that they belong.

Being welcoming creates a community feel, engaging in a sense of togetherness.

In verbal and written communication a welcoming tone is approachable, further creating an inclusive environment.
What does welcoming feel like?
Invite them: Open a sense of joint togetherness, a sense of community and shared goals

Be a good host: Keep a friendly and open attitude and demeanor, even during peek busy periods

Listen to our community: Create open communication to ensure a community feel with engaging meaningful conversations

Spontaneous: Like surprising a friend with a phone call of good news, use tools to reach the community in a similar fashion, Twitter, the website and email blasts allow you to be spontaneous and fun
Supportive
Always being positive and believing in the possibilities of what can be accomplished.

Take great pride in everything we do, celebrating our successes.

Being supportive means helping the community to create an inclusive and warm place for everyone.
How do we convey support?
Inspire with stories: Share stories of the families and individuals who use our facility, they can describe the importance better than anyone else

Use visual aids: A picture says more than a thousand words, when sharing stories and information support them with info graphics, or photos

Be engaged: A safe and encouraging environment is important to everyone, be compassionate, use encouraging communication - "You can do it!"

Look forward to the future: Staying focused on our end goal, always keeping in mind the impact that one small action has on the wider community, and how much more can be achieved
Conversation starters
Questions to open a conversation:

How are you enjoying Abilities Centre?

Have you been able to explore some of the different areas?

Has anything caught your attention?

Would you like a tour to see all of the amenities again?

Have you received our email newsletters to be reminded of upcoming classes and programs?
Telephone Impressions
Never let the caller know you are busy - in person or on the phone, our customers deserve our undivided attention!
Always resolve as many inquires as you can without having to transfer to voicemail.
Remember other customers can see you while you are on the phone, keep a positive demeanor.
Return any messages within 24 hours.
A smile can be heard over the phone!
Feedback
"Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning." - Bill Gates
We are all responsible for the experience that our members get while at Abilities Centre.
Be open to feedback in any and all forms.

Use positive conflict resolution when necessary:
apologize
listen
empathize
ask
discuss
follow-up
Full transcript