Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Poem 1- Poem 11 "Your green in these eyes"

No description
by

Tadeo Helou

on 30 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Poem 1- Poem 11 "Your green in these eyes"

photo credit Nasa / Goddard Space Flight Center / Reto Stöckli "Your green in these eyes"
By Mario Petrucci Untitled…
By Mario Petrucci Even this earth,
Must yield a little
At every step we take.
Can’t you feel?

Or hear our dead:
Their tiny time
Shrunk moans
Flittering up

Through clay loam
Made dense with fresh
And bone- just
To support us Analyzing Structure

The poem has three regular stanzas, all of them have four sentences Alliterations

There is only one alliteration in the poem, it is in the stanza number two; “tiny time” must be what you’re sprouting to
make food for yourself down
implicate pathways of sun
corpuscled / muscled
by light fuelling
down through
seen-through veins
where sap’s thicker-than
rises drawn from the mantle
to meet & merge with sun’s work
done as though you were an upward
well our balled rock steadied in space by
a single green gaze guyed in place by this sol
-itary showing of leaves all spindled on your trunk Tone

The tones are reflective and serious The Theme

The themes of the poem are "Humans and the earth" or "We and the Earth" "The Earth, a recycling machine" "Recycling" There is no anaphora There are no metaphors neither similes; no comparisons This poem draws attention to our relationship with soil. Most of our sustenance comes, directly or indirectly, from the land; even the sea is fertilized by sediments and run-off. Our entire planet is an organism recycling nutrients and organic matter. Our bodies are recycled, in part, from our ancestors and into our progeny. The phrase, “our dead”, in the poem, does not necessarily come up from isolation or pain. If we are what we eat, we are soil. Darkly, richly, the poem celebrates that fact. In our opinion what Mario Petrucci wants to express in this poem is that we, humans, when we die, become part of the soil, earth. Poems 1 and 11
Teacher: Patricia Chujman
Students: Tadeo Helou and Abril Lopez
Deadline: 19/10/12 Vocabulary Shrunk, past of shrink; become or make smaller in size or amount Moan: a long, low sound made by a person expressing physical or mental suffering Flittering: move quickly in an apparently random or purposeless manner Clay: a stiff, sticky fine-grained earth that can be moulded when wet, and is dried and baked to make bricks, pottery, and ceramics Flesh: the edible pulpy part of a fruit or vegetable When you read the title of this poem “Your green in these eyes” you realize that the poem would talk about something green, and nature is green so it is obvious that is talking about it. But the word “Eyes” is in the title too, so perhaps is the way that a human, or human’s eyes see nature, or his/her point of view of the nature. Theme: Nature/How to take care of nature/Complains about nature Voice: A person who gives his or her opinion about nature Tone: Reflective Voice: A person who gives his or her opinion about nature Alliteration: Food for Yourself
Meet and merge Imageries: Pathways of sun
a single green gaze Sprouting: grow (plant shoots or hair)
Muscled: Hard-Muscled
Fuel: material such as coal, gas, or oil that is burned to produce heat or power
Sap: the fluid which circulates in the vascular system of a plant, consisting chiefly of water with dissolved sugars and mineral salts.
Mantle: a loose sleeveless cloak or shawl, worn especially by women
Merge: combine or cause to combine to form a single entity Sprouting: grow (plant shoots or hair)
Muscled: Hard-Muscled
Fuel: material such as coal, gas, or oil that is burned to produce heat or power
Sap: the fluid which circulates in the vascular system of a plant, consisting chiefly of water with dissolved sugars and mineral salts.
Mantle: a loose sleeveless cloak or shawl, worn especially by women
Merge: combine or cause to combine to form a single entity Sprouting: grow (plant shoots or hair)
Muscled: Hard-Muscled
Fuel: material such as coal, gas, or oil that is burned to produce heat or power
Sap: the fluid which circulates in the vascular system of a plant, consisting chiefly of water with dissolved sugars and mineral salts.
Mantle: a loose sleeveless cloak or shawl, worn especially by women
Merge: combine or cause to combine to form a single entity Vocabulary There is no anaphora There are no metaphors neither similes, no comparisons "Most of our sustenance comes, directly or indirectly, from the land; even the sea is fertilised by sediments and run-off. Our entire planet is an organism recycling nutrients and organic matter. Our bodies are recycled, in part, from our ancestors and into our progeny. " The phrase, “our dead”, in the poem, does not necessarily arise from isolation or pain. "If we are what we eat, we are soil. Darkly, richly, the poem celebrates that fact." "This poem draws attention to our relationship with soil. " Imageries “shrunk moans”: auditory

“flittering up”: visual

“clay, loam”: tactile and visual

“at every step we take.”: visual

“or hear our dead”: auditory

"made dense with flesh": taste Structure

The poem has three regular stanzas, all of them have four lines Message Most of our sustenance comes, directly or indirectly, from the land, our bodies are recycled, in part, from our ancestors and into our progeny.
Full transcript