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Nigerian 419 Scam

E-PORTFOLIO ACTIVITY 6
by

asenaca turagavou

on 10 November 2012

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Transcript of Nigerian 419 Scam

CYBER CRIME Nigeria 419 Scam ORIGIN MECHANICS
Some of the methods used were Employment scams, Lottery Scams, Romance Scam , Online Sales and many more.
Employment Scam :- A new scam targets people who have posted their resumes on job sites.
Romance Scam :- A recent variant is the Romance Scam, which is a money-for-romance angle.
Online sales and rentals :- Many scams involve the purchase of goods and services via classified advertisements, especially on sites like Craigslist, eBay, or Gumtree. PREVENTIVE MEASURES A REAL LIFE INCIDENT CHARTS # * % * ^ + % ^ BIBLIOGRAPHY The origin of the 419 scam is currently debated. Many critics consider that the scam was first introduced to Nigeria by Nigerian petroleum companies and criminal gangs in the 1970s or 1980s. Others believe that the scam was a mixture of diverse frauds in the Igboland region, some hundreds of years old. The first scams involved lucrative oil contracts and other related frauds. Until about 2001, the scammers were located primarily in Lagos, Aba, Owerri, and Port Harcourt, Nigeria.. Identity Theft
•Ensure websites are protected prior to submitting your credit card number.
•Do your homework to ensure the business or website is legitimate.
Investment Fraud
•If the "opportunity" appears too good to be true, it probably is.
•Beware of promises to make fast profits.
•Do not invest in anything unless you understand the deal.
Lotteries
•If the lottery winnings appear too good to be true, they probably are.
•Be cautious when dealing with individuals outside of your own country.
•Be leery if you do not remember entering a lottery or contest. SOME OF THE PREVENTIVE MEASURES CAN BE: this chart shows how the nigerian 419 works. HISTORY

The spread of email and email haversting software significantly lowered the cost of sending scam letters by using the Internet. While Nigeria is most often the nation referred to in these scams, they may be originated in other nations as well. For example, in 2006, 61% of Internet criminals were traced to locations in the United states while 16% were traced to the United Kingdom and 6% to locations in Nigeria Other nations known to have a high incidence of advance fee fraud include Togo, South Africa the Netherlands and Spain
The Nigerian 419 scam is a type of advance fee fraud similar to the Spanish prisoner scam dating back to the late 19th century. In that con, businessmen were contacted by an individual allegedly trying to smuggle someone connected to a wealthy family out of a prison in Spain. In exchange for aid, the scammer promised to share money with the victim in exchange for a small amount of money to bribe prison guards. Another variant of the scam, dating back to circa 1830, appears very similar to what is passed via email today: "'Sir, you will be doubtlessly be astonished to be receiving a letter from a person unknown to you, who is about to ask a favor from you . . .' and goes on to talk of a casket containing 16,000 francs in gold and the diamonds of a late marchioness." On 23rd of September,2008 a Kenth Sadaaki Suzuki, a swedish businessman, was involved to South Africa and was kidnapped.He was taken to a house in Rosettenville in Johannesburg and rip-off all his belongings. there after a ransom of €20,000 was demanded from his family. two people were arrested.They are also related to the kidnapping of three American citizens and perhaps other similar cases. ORIGIN
Lanford, J. a. (n.d.). Scambusters. Retrieved november 10, 2012, from Scambusters.org: http://www.scambusters.org/nigerianscams2.html
Mikkelson, B. a. (2012, February 1). Snope. Retrieved November 10, 2012, from Snopes.com: http://www.snopes.com/fraud/advancefee/nigeria.asp
P, m. B. (2010, February 1). Wikipedia. Retrieved November 10, 2012, from wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_scam
Wizard, B. (2002, september 17). home.rica.net. Retrieved november 10, 2012, from Nigeria- The 419 Coalition Website: http://home.rica.net/alphae/419coal/

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