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Loss and Suffering p2

Mark, Eissa, and Michael Stacey
by

Eissa Qa

on 21 October 2014

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Transcript of Loss and Suffering p2

Eissa Qader
Mark Blakely
Michelle Stacey

Liesel and Rudy.
Max hides away in the basment and turns himself in.

On Munich Street, a boy and a girl were entwined. They were twisted and comfortless on the road. Together, they watched the humans disappear. (80.94-96)


Rudy has fought Liesel to keep her from chasing after Max, and has probably saved her life and Max's by doing this. The scene is filled with suffering for all involved.
Theme : Loss and Suffering
Loss and Suffering
Theme

Michael's suicide
I witness the ones that are left behind, crumbled among the jigsaw puzzles of realization, despair, and surprise. They have punctured hearts. They have beaten lungs. (1.22)


From Death's point of view, living with the loss of a loved one is much worse than dying.
I suppose my first standover man was my father,




but he vanished before I could remember him


This is saying that his dad was the first person who actually cared for him but left before he could even remember.
To live. Living was living. The price was guilt and shame. (35.19-21)


This theme is repeated over and over in the novel, by anyone who survives. Michael Holtzapfel's guilt over his brother's death (which he had nothing to do with) drives him to suicide.
visual symbol
"How about a kiss, Saumensch," are the words Rudy said to her that day he rescued her book from the Amper River. The day he stopped asking.
I chose this picture because of how
Michael felt confused of his life after
his brother died in combat
This theme is still relevant because there is a lot of hard ships and war going on currently

we can learn
how to handle problems by
looking at each others mistakes
When death captures me, the boy vowed, he will feel my fist in his face. (31.26)


This is saying that Max thinks he is going to die from the sickness and lose liesel and her family so he tells her that he won't be taken by death.
Full transcript