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the persian wars

history
by

matthew szalay

on 9 September 2012

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Transcript of the persian wars

The Persian Wars Reasons for the Persian War Battle of Marathon First Persian War Second Persian War Weaponry The Battle of Personality Study Legacy of the Persian Wars Bibliography Ionia - The Ionian revolt (c. 499-c.493) led to the Persian Wars, it included the famous Battle of Thermopylae, and the Battle of Marathon.

Thermopylae - Thermopylae, which means "hot gates" was a pass the Greeks tried to defend in battle against Persians led by Xerxes, in 480 B.C. The Persians won the Battle of Thermopylae.

Salamis - The Battle of Salamis was a turning point in the Persian War and showed the naval supremacy of Athens.

Marathon - Ionian Greeks found the Persian rule oppressive and attempted to revolt with the aid of the mainland Greeks.

Plataea - Spartans, Tegeans, and Athenians fought the Persian army that remained in Greece, at the final battle on Greek soil of the Persian Wars, the Battle of Plataea, in 479 B.C.

Delphi - Delphi is best known as the home of the Delphic Oracle or the Pythia, a priestess of Apollo.

Aegean Sea - Was the main shipping line between Asia Minor and Greece

Artemisium - The Battle of Artemisium or Artemision was a series of naval engagements over three days during the second Persian invasion of Greece

Euboea - A large island off the Greek mainland

Eretria - The naval Battle of Eretria, between Sparta and Athens, took place in September 411 BC, off the coast of Euboea

Miletus - Miletus was one of the great Ionian cities in southwestern Asia Minor. In 499 Miletus led the Ionian revolt that was a contributing factor in the Persian Wars. It was destroyed 5 years later.

Mt Athos -

Thrace - The indigenous population of Thrace was a people called the Thracians, divided into numerous tribal groups. Thracian troops were known to accompany neighboring ruler Alexander the Great when he crossed the Hellespont which
abuts Thrace, and took on the Persian Empire of the day.

Athens - Is the capital of Greece

Hellespont - Hellespont, is a narrow strait in northwestern Turkey connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara.

Isthmus of Corinth - The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow land bridge which connects the Peloponnese peninsula with the rest of the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth.

Sparta - was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece, situated on the banks of the Eurotas River in Laconia, in south-eastern Peloponnese.

Mycale - The Battle of Mycale was one of the two major battles that ended the second Persian invasion of Greece during the Greco-Persian Wars. It took place on or about August 27, 479 BC on the slopes of Mount Mycale Battle of Plataea Battle of Thermopylae Battle of Artemisium Battle of Salamis http://www.ancientgreekbattles.net/Pages/47930_BattleOfMycale.htm The greek cities in asia minor staged a revolt against the persian king. It happened in 498 BC these forces helped to capture and burn the Persian regional capital of Sardis. www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/marathon.htm It was fought between the citizens of Athens, aided by Plataea, and a Persian force commanded by Datis and Artaphernes. Pheidipides ran from Athens to Sparta to ask for help from the Spartans while the Persians were attacking
The hoplites attacked the centre of the Persian army then went after wings there general told the Greek soldiers to run in a straight line at the Persians
The Persian Calvary could not fight because of the marshy ground leading to their defeat www.livius.org/man-md/marathon/marathon.html http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/persianwars/a/TimePersianWars.htm The Battle of Salamis was a decisive naval battle that followed the Battle of Thermopylae the one where the 300 Spartans and allies made a brave, but hopeless stand against the far superior forces of the Persians. After Thermopylae, the Persian forces destroyed Athens. But by the time the Persians arrived, Athens had been evacuated and the Greek military leaders were preparing to meet the Persians at Salamis
Thermopylae was a pass the Greeks tried to defend in battle against Persians led by Xerxes, in 480 B.C. The Persians won the Battle of Thermopylae. The Battle of Artemisium or Artemision was a series of naval engagements over three days during the second Persian invasion of Greece. The battle took place simultaneously with the more famous land battle at Thermopylae, in August or September 480 BC, off the coast of Euboea and was fought between an alliance of Greek city-states, including Sparta, Athens, Corinth and others, and the Persian Empire of Xerxes I. In 479 B.C., Themistocles (c. 514-449 B.C.), an Athenian statesman, stationed the Athenian fleet at Salamis, artificial retreat, and lured the navy of the Persians into the narrow strait at Salamis, so that the Greek ships could ram the vessels of the Persian and allies. Themistocles' plan worked. The allied forces of the Persians were defeated and retreated. Spartans, Tegeans, and Athenians fought the Persian army that remained in Greece, at the final battle on Greek soil of the Persian Wars, the Battle of Plataea, in 479 B.C.
Xerxes and his fleet had returned to Persia, but Persian troops remained in Greece, under Mardonius. They stationed themselves for battle in a place suitable for their horsemen -- the plain. Under the Spartan leader Pausanias, the Greeks stationed themselves advantageously in the foothills of Mt. Cithaeron. Weaponry-2 Fully equipped Hoplite Battle of Mycale The Greeks when they understood that the barbarians had fled to the mainland, were sorely vexed at their escape; nor could they determine at first what they should do, whether they should return home, or proceed to the Hellespont. In the end, however, they resolved to do neither, but to make sail for the continent. So they made themselves ready for a sea fight by the preparations of boarding bridges, and what else was necessary; with which they sailed to Mycale. Now when they came to the place where the camp was, they found no one venture out to meet them, but observed the ships all dragged ashore within the barrier, and a strong land force drawn up in battle array upon the beach, a fortress newly built behind the enemy forces. Leotychides therefore sailed along the shore in his ships, keeping as close hauled to the land as possible, and by the voice of a herald thus addressed the Ionians in a manner that they should remember that the Greeks were there to free them from the Persians and to not offer any resistance to the Greek force. Darius perpaired to invade mainland Greece by sea and land.Seeking to secure his empire from further revolts and from the interference of the mainland Greeks, Darius embarked on a scheme to conquer Greece and to punish Athens and Eretria for burning Sardis. The first Persian invasion of Greece began in 492 BC, with the Persian general Mardonius conquering Thrace and Macedon before several mishaps forced an early end to the campaign. In 490 BC a second force was sent to Greece, this time across the Aegean Sea, under the command of Datis and Artaphernes. The Persian king Darius fought and defeated the revolutionary city states. He sought revenge against the mainland city states which supported the Ionian Greeks. That revolt was progressively drawing more regions of Asia Minor into the conflict. The Persian king Darius the Great vowed to have revenge on Athens and Eritrea for this act. A Greek Triremene spear -> body plate-> head gear-> leggings-> small sail-> big sail-> <- rowers sit <- greek flag wood body work-> <-Rudder <-Sheild sandals->
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