Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

RELI 1304 Major World Religions

Introductory Presentation
by

Stuart Chepey

on 10 June 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of RELI 1304 Major World Religions

World Religions Review
Hinduism
Buddhism
Judaism
Christianity
Islam
Who is a Hindu?
A Hindu is someone who identifies
with the religious beliefs and practices
indigenous to the Indian sub-continent.
Nomenclature
"Hinduism" = non-indigenous, Western name
"Sanatana-dharma" = indigenous, Eastern (Asian) name
Sanskrit
Bhagavad-gita
Hindu Sacred Literature
Shruti
Smriti
da
Sama-veda
Atharva-veda
Yajur-veda
Vedas
Upanishads
(Epic Stories)
Ramayana
Mahabharata
(*Bhagavad-gita)
Mahavishnu Swami,
b. Birmingham, England
Bhakti Tirtha Swami, USA
George Harrison, England
Jin Shan Shan (of China)
with daughter,
Bharatnatyan dancer
Dharma
Sanatana -"eternal"
Dharma - "the way of the universe and one's role within it"
Dharma - "The way of the universe and one's role within it"
The Three Paths
Atman - soul; true-self
Brahman - universal consciousness; GOD
Samasara - Sanskrit; lit. "to wander across"
Karma
Moksha
the law of behavioral (moral) cause and effect
action
reaction
Bhakti-marga
Jnana-marga
Karma-marga
"path of devotion"
"path of knowledge"
"path of action"
Temples
Places of Pilgrimage
Home
Banaras - Varanasi, India
Atman=Brahman
Who is a Buddhist?
A Buddhist is someone who...
identifies with the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, called
"the Buddha."
The Four Noble Truths
(1) Life is suffering
(2) Suffering is caused by attachment
(3) Suffering can have an end
(4) There is a path theat leads to the end of suffering
Vows
I take refuge in (1) the Buddha, (2) the Dharma, and (3) the Sangha
Nomenclature
Siddhartha Gautama
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
Buddhism (Buddhist) = Western, non-indigenous name
Dharma, Buddha-dharma, Buddha-sasana = Eastern, indigenous name
Sanskrit; also Pali
Caste (Varna)
Brahmins - Priests
Warriors/Royalty/Aristocracy
Commoners
Slaves/Servants
Aryan or Indigenous Religion?
Aryan Migration
Indus Valley Civilization
(Harrapan Civilization)
The Pali Canon
or
Tipitaka = "Three Baskets"
Main Divisions
Sutta Pitaka: Teachings of the Buddha
Vinaya Pitaka: Rules for Monks
Abhidhamma Pitaka: Philosophical Discourse
The Life of Sidhartha
No biography
Legendary Motifs - What led him to leave palace life?
wrinkled and bent old man
man with disease
rotting corpse
peaceful monk
Buddha-dharma
atman
Brahman?
Samsara?
karma
moksha?
nirvana
end of attachment; absence of suffering
A
Akuppa, flikr
Akuppa, flikr
Main Families of Buddhism
Mahayana
Theravada
Maya
Peasant - manual labor
Untoucheables - cleaners, tanners, etc. (the dirtiest work)
Today
Who is a Jew?
(1) "Jew" and "Jewish" refer both to a religion and a race. (a) In the religious sense, a Jew is someone who identifies with the Abrahamic covenant as revealed in the Hebrew scriptures; (b) in the ethnic sense, historically, a Jew is someone from the Semitic, tribal peoples of ancient Judah (later, Judea). The designation was, and is today especially complicated by intermarriage and the allowance for conversion.
Nomenclature
The Tanakh
T - Torah
N - Nevi'im
K - Kethuvim
"The Law" (also, "instruction")
"The Prophets"
"The Writings"
Hebrew (and some Aramiac in the latest books)
Judaism in the Time of Jesus
What Differed Among Jews?
What Did Jews Share in Common?
Geographic Locations
Language
Interpretation of Tradition
One God
One Temple
One Priesthood
One Loosely Agreed Set of Sacred Scriptures
Common Festivals
What Jews Shared in Common also Made Them Very Different From their Surrounding Cultures
(with no Image)
(in Jerusalem)
(hereditary)
Aramaic, Hebrew (written, some spoke), Greek, Others
Throughout the Mediterranean World and Mesopotamia
Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Qumran Community, Early Christian Groups, Others
Torah (perhaps not all of the Prophets nor Writings)
Passover (First-Fruits, Booths)
The Main Families of Judaism Today
Orthodox
Reform (Progressive)
Conservative
Hasidic
Rabbinic Judaism
Most Influential Organizational Movement Since the Decline of the Priesthood
Developed from the Late 1st cent. CE
Organized Schools for Training and Study
Rabbi - Someone who gives advice on matters of the Bible and how to live as a good Jew
Mishnah and Talmud Produced in Palestine (esp. Galilee) and Babylonia
anatman
no soul; no permanent true-self
Then who are we truly?
Brahman
Living beings comprised of...
- body
- feelings (pleasure and pain)
- perception
- will
- consciousness
All of which are subject to change
Who is a Christian?
A Christian is someone who identifies with the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth (by faith), and who is baptized into the Church.
Baptism
Church
Roman Catholic
Eastern Orthodox
Protestant (Reformed)
Nomenclature
Jesus of Nazareth
Jesus Christ
Christian
Yeshua
Meshiach
Iesous
Christos
Nazarenes
The Way
The Bible
ta biblia - "the books"
Old Testament
New Testament
Testament - Lat., testamentum - "covenant"
Jeremiah 31:31ff.
Moses
Jesus
Luke 21:7-20; Matthew 26:26-29
When and Why Did Judasim and Chrstianity Separate?
50's C.E. - Paul's Preaching in the Diaspora
62 C.E. - Death of James
70 C.E. - Roman Destruction of Jerusalem/the Great Disaposra
132-135 C.E. - Second Jewisw Revolt
325 C.E. - Constantine's Letter
Gospels and Historical Jesus
Gospel - from Old Eng., god spell - "good news"
from New Testament Greek - euangelion (Lat., evangelion ) - "good news"
Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John
Mark, Matthew, and Luke = Synoptic Gospels
Main Families of Christianity
(Roman)
Catholic
(Eastern)
Orthodox
(Reformed)
Protestant
312/313 C.E.
330 C.E.
380 C.E.
476 C.E.
1054 C.E.
"Catholic" - universal; united
"Orthodox" - right worship
1517 C.E. - Martin Luther
95 Thesis
Authority of the Bishop
Others: John Calvin,
John Knox, Ulrich Zwingly
sola fides
sola scriptura
Church and Rituals
Seven Sacraments (Cath., Orthodox., Angl.)
baptism
eucharist
confirmation
confession/penance
marriage
holy orders
unction
Leadership
Cath/Orth/Angl
bishop
priest
deacon
Protestant (other than Angl)
pastor/elders
deacon
Church - Mid. Eng., chirche; Greek, kyriakon, "of the Lord."
Despite its derivation from kyriakon, "church" is used throughout the New Testament as a transltion of the Greek term, ekklesia (ecclesia) - "assembly." A "church" thus refers both to the assembled people of the Lord and also to the place where the assembly meets.
Sacrament - from Lat., sacramentum; a sacred sign (reflecting an inner, mysterious reality); essentially, an object or act that conveys God's grace to the recipient.
Protestants (other than Angl)
typically view these acts as merely symbolic and not as a meand to receive God's grace.
4 Main Groups
Lutheran
Presbyterion
Anabaptist (baptist)
Anglican
Twice Born
The Bible (Old and New Testaments)
The Trinity
Greek
Bible - "the book"
Who is a Muslim?
A Muslim is someone who confesses (by faith) that (1) there is no god but God, and (2) Muhammad is the messenger of God.
(1)Qur'an (2)Sunna
Nomenclature
Islam - "to submit"
Muslim - "one who submits"
One who submits to the will of God as revealed in the Qur'an and Sunna of the Prophet.
Arabic
Al- Fatiha
The Qur'an
Sura - "chapter"; lit. "row"
Aya - "verse"; lit. "sign"
114 Suras
arranged from longest to shortest with the exception of the Fatiha
6,346 Ayas
Qur'an (Koran) - Arabic - "recitation"
Al-Fatiha
The Life of Muhammad
Key Dates
570 C.E.
610 C.E.
615 C.E.
622 C.E. (Hijra)
630 C.E.
632 C.E.
Founding of the Ummah (in Yathrib; later named Medina)
Hijri Calendar - Lat., Anno Hegirae (A.H.)
622 C.E. = 1 A.H.
Saudi Arabi (Today)
Five Pillars
Shahadah (Confession)
Prayer (5x)
Alms
Fasting (Ramadan)
Pilgrimage (Hajj)
Main Families of Islam
Sunni
Shi'ite
Sufi
Abraham, Ishmael, and the Ka'aba
Abraham
Sarah
Hagar
Isaac
Ishmael
Jacob (Israel)
12 Tribes of Israel
Arab Peoples
Muhammad
Key Historical Developments
Four Orthodox Caliphs - 632-661 C.E.
Ummayd Caliphate - 661-750 C.E.
Abbasid Dynasty - 750 - 1258 C.E.
Development of Kalam and Sharia
Arabic, "trodden path"; rel. to sunna - "example"
majority denomination
from Arabic, "party, supporters of Ali"
minority denomination
fivers, severs, twelvers
particular festivals and customs
belief in future appearance and political role of Mahdi (twelvers)
Wahhabi
from Arabic, "wool"
brotherhoods began during Abbasid period
interest in mystical experience with the divine
few Sufi brotherhoods today
Halal/Haram
Mosque
from Arabic, masjid - "place of prostration (prayer)
Imam
Shi'ite Shahadah
"There is no god but God, and Muhammad is the messenger of God, and
I testify that Ali is his successor"
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Full transcript