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The Impact of Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance on Society

1920s Project (Daniel Ausherman, Fiona Zahm, Devyn Shank, and Brandon Lee)
by

Devyn Shank

on 30 October 2013

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Transcript of The Impact of Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance on Society

Jazz music started a cultural movement, which influenced the dress, language, and attitude of youth. Jazz was also associated with interracial sex and illegal drugs such as marijuana and heroin. Jazz was an urban style of music and was linked to urban nightlife, prohibition, vice zones, dance halls, inner city neighborhoods, and concert stages. Many people disliked jazz music. For many of the educated, middle class, jazz was considered "the devil's music." Jazz music created a new, rebellious society, in which people could do whatever they wished.
The Influence of Jazz on Society
How did the Harlem Renaissance and jazz influence society in the 1920's?
The Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was a literary, artistic, cultural, and intellectual movement that began soon after World War I and ended in the 1930's. Its roots were in Harlem, New York. This movement brought up huge issues in the lives of African Americans through art forms including music, drama, painting, sculpture, movies, but mainly literature. Jazz music became increasingly popular during this time, and many musicians in the black community influenced its progress. The Harlem Renaissance was the beginning of the change in the identity of black culture.
Effects of the Harlem Renaissance on Society
The Jazz Revolution
Jazz music evolved from hymns, work songs, and field hollers in the South. Jazz music became increasingly popular in the 1920's and had roots in large cities, such as New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, and Detroit. The jazz revolution was partly caused by the Great Migration, a movement from the South to cities. African Americans moved towards cities in the search of a better life. The urbanization of Negroes influenced the jazz revolution. Jazz evolved with African Americans.
Works Cited
"89.01.05: The Impact of the Music of the Harlem Renaissance on Society." <i>89.01.05: The Impact of the Music of the Harlem Renaissance on Society</i>. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013. &lt;http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1989/1/89.01.05.x.html&gt;.

"46e. The Harlem Renaissance." <i>The Harlem Renaissance [ushistory.org]</i>. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013. &lt;http://www.ushistory.org/us/46e.asp&gt;.

"Harlem Renaissance." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/harlem-renaissance>.

"Jazz and the African American Literary Tradition, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center." Jazz and the African American Literary Tradition, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013. <http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve

"The Harlem Renaissance brought to you by John Carroll University." The Harlem Renaissance brought to you by John Carroll University. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013. <http://www.jcu.edu/harlem/>.

A Prezi Presentation created by:
Daniel Ausherman, Fiona Zahm, Devyn Shank, and Brandon Lee

The Harlem Renaissance effected society in several key ways. African American culture was reborn and there was an explosion of cultural pride. African Americans were finally able to express themselves and prove that they were as capable as white Americans. The white mainstream also took notice of "the black America" during this time period. The American public became more accepting of the Black voice. White people also traveled to Harlem because of its exciting night life. People were able to escape usual moral restrictions and engaged in casual sex, drugs, and alcohol. The Harlem Renaissance created a new culture, free from the ideas of what was socially acceptable. The Harlem Renaissance changed society forever.
Photographs and Pictures from the Harlem Renaissance and Jazzy 1920's
Full transcript