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Harvard Referencing

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Victoria Edwards

on 28 November 2016

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Transcript of Harvard Referencing

Give you the skills to reference correctly, in line with Warwickshire College Group's academic standards.

Give you an understanding of plagiarism and how to avoid it.
You MUST NOT take someone else's writing and place it in your essay, saying it is your own work, this is called plagiarism.

It is polite to identify the writers whose writing you have used to support or contradict your own work.

When you quote other writers in your references, you give people reading your work the opportunity to locate the original sources.
PLAGIARISM
https://www.warkscol.ac.uk/intranet/default.asp?cNode=23248

The style preferred by Warwickshire College Group.

It is flexible, simple and clear and easy to use both for the author and the reader.

It is almost impossible to write an essay without using some previously published material.

Referencing shows you have carried out research and will help you get higher marks.

It increases your knowledge and experience of the subject you are writing about.

It demonstrates the body of knowledge on which you have based your work.

It allows your work to be checked and verified and prevents plagiarism.




A quick guide...
HARVARD REFERENCING
PLAGIARISM IS CHEATING
AND YOU WILL LOSE GRADES
IF YOU DO IT.

ANYONE FOUND CHEATING CAN BE REMOVED FROM THEIR COURSE.

WHAT IS SUMMARISING?



Taking the main ideas from a piece of text and rewriting them in your own words.

A summary is much shorter than the original text and gives an overview of a topic.
Try picking out the main points from this next piece of text....
QUOTING IN THE TEXT
Direct quote – copy text word for word
and enclose in “ ”.

Paraphrasing – re-word someone else’s work.

Summarising – use your own words to
present the key points of an
author's argument.

Tea, whether of the China or Indian variety, is well known to be high on the list of those beverages which are most frequently drunk by the inhabitants of the British Isles.
The British drink a large amount
of tea.
CITING IN THE TEXT
A complete quote lifted from a source should go in quote marks with the surname of the author, the date and where it is in the book.
“It is evident that whereas affluence and absence of poverty has been generally linked to good child health outcomes in the past, they were now not necessarily a true indicator of potential health.” (Reed and Canning, 2010, p.85)
QUOTING IN THE TEXT -
PARAPHRASING
The author and the date of publication are needed
Brock (2009) discusses the importance of quantitative and qualitative research…..

OR

When planning your project it is important to use primary sources (Brock, 2009).…

QUOTING IN THE TEXT -
SUMMARISING

Use your own words and not those of the original author (unless you are using quotation marks).

Correctly interpret the original text.

Remember to name the original source in your reference list.

So….

..you have quoted in the main body of the text….

..now you need to reference it at the end of your work..

Aveyard, H. (2010)
Doing a Literature Review in Health and Social Care
(2nd ed.), Maidenhead, Oxford University Press. Chapter 7, pp. 164-195.

Brock, A. (2009) Perspectives on Play: learning for life (online), Harlow, Pearson Longman. Available from <http://www.dawsonera.com/depp/reader/protected/external/AbstractView/S9781444137156> (Accessed 6th September 2013).

Evans, M. (2012) Unique Child: Health - an Essential Guide to Vitamin D,
Nursery World
(online), (28th Jan-10th Feb), pp.14-18. Available from <http://www.nurseryworld.co.uk/news/1168288/Unique-Child-Health---essential-guide-Vitamin-D/> (Accessed 16th September 2013)

Hayes, C. (2013) Dispelling Myths about Ageing for Healthcare Assistants,
British Journal of Healthcare Assistants
, 7 (July), pp. 337-341.

Health and Social Care : UK National Statistics Publication Hub (No date)
Health and Social Care
(online). Available from <http://www.statistics.gov.uk/hub/health-social-care> (Accessed 6th September 2013)
Your reference list should be in alphabetical order...
Don't worry...
...we also have an
app that can help!
https://www.refme.com/
Surname, Initials. (Date)
Title
(? ed.), Place of publication, Publisher.

Aveyard, H. (2010)
Doing a Literature Review in Health and Social Care
(2nd ed.), Maidenhead, Oxford University Press.
To reference a book...
Surname, Initials. (Date)
Title
(?ed.)(online), Place of publication, Publisher. Available from <http://www.remainder of the full Internet address> (Accessed day month year)

Brock, A. (2009)
Perspectives on Play:learning for life
(online), Harlow, Pearson Longman. Available from <http://www.dawsonera.com/depp/reader/protected/external/AbstractView/S9781444137156> (Accessed 6th September 2016)


To reference an E-book..
Surname, Initials. (date) Title of article,
Journal Name
, Volume number, (Part number), pp.page numbers.

Beckett, D. (2009) Biotin sensing at the molecular level,
The Journal of Nutrition
, 139 (1), pp.167-170.
To reference a journal..
Full transcript