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Citizenship in a Republic

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Ana A

on 28 October 2014

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Transcript of Citizenship in a Republic

Citizenship in a Republic - Rhetoric Analysis
By: Ana Sofía Abufele
SOAP Elements
Speaker
Remember...
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena,
whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least
fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
Occasion
Immediate Occasion:
Speech
Audience
The audience at the University of Sorbonne in Paris, France
Purpose
The purpose of this speech was to spread his belief that the success of a nation relied on its people and their individual progress and work.
Theodore Roosevelt

26th US President
Politician, author, naturalist, soldier, explorer and historian
Larger Occasion
Persuasive Appeal
"Today I shall speak to you on the subject of individual citizenship, the one subject of vital importance to you, my hearers, and to me and my countrymen, because you and we a great citizens of great democratic republics. A democratic republic such as ours - an effort to realize its full sense government by, of, and for the people"
Rhetorical Devices
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood;
who
strives valiantly;
who
errs,
who
comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but
who
does actually strive to do the deeds;
who
knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions;
who
spends himself in a worthy cause;
who
at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and
who
at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
Parallelism
Persuasive Appeal
Rhetorical Devices
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena." - Slogan
ETHOS
"The success or republics like yours and like ours means the glory, and our failure of despair, of mankind; and for you and for us the question of the quality of the individual citizen is supreme."
Theodore Roosevelt was to deliver a speech at the University of Sorbonne in Paris, France
In 1910, Theodore Roosevelt went on a tour in Europe to deliver his Nobel Peace Prize Speech and put forward the doctrine of New Nationalism. At the time, France had just had a flood and was suffering through the devastation the flood had left.

Everyone in the world
"Is it right to prevail? Are the great laws of righteousness once more to be fulfilled?" - Rhetorical Question
"Average citizen" - Repetition
ETHOS
"How long the leadership in arms and letters has lasted is curiously illustrated by the fact that the earliest masterpiece in a modern tongue is the splendid French epic which tells of Roland’s doom and the vengeance of Charlemange when the lords of the Frankish hosts where stricken at Roncesvalles. Let those who have, keep, let those who have not, strive to attain, a high standard of cultivation and scholarship...
We must ever remember that no keenness and subtleness of intellect, no polish, no cleverness, in any way make up for the lack of the great solid qualities. Self restraint, self mastery, common sense, the power of accepting individual responsibility and yet of acting in conjunction with others, courage and resolution - these are the qualities which mark a masterful people."
Effectiveness of the use of Rhetorical Devices
Theodore Roosevelt uses rhetoric throughout his speech in order to convey his point that a nation is as strong as its average citizens. Theodore Roosevelt wants to make everyone understand that they can do something for their country and he makes this known by repeating "average citizen" throughout the speech. He insists that an average citizen should be a good citizen to emphasize that everyone can contribute in some way to their country, to empower those who may feel like their voice is unheard and are not influential in the world. His speech is famous because of his "man in the arena" excerpt and has been quoted by many famous figures like Richard Nixon and Nelson Mandela. In this excerpt of the speech, Roosevelt recognizes that the "doers" of the country are those who move it towards progress, not those who sit back and judge others. It recognizes that hard work that individuals perform to reach their goals everyday. Most of the persuasive appeals can be found in this speech, but Ethos really shines through. Theodore Roosevelt wants to convince not only the people of France, but everyone in the world that success lies in each of our hands. He needs to convince others that he can be trusted and that he wants the same thing they do in order for his message to be understood and put into effect. Overall, Theodore Roosevelt was successful in conveying his message as it is still used today by important political figures.
10:13 - 12:17
Full transcript