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Screening of gluten free products

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Lea Baddour

on 28 May 2014

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Transcript of Screening of gluten free products

Screening of Gluten Level in Gluten-free Products Produced and Marketed in Lebanon

Gluten refers to the proteins found in
wheat
(responsible for the elasticity of dough, which in turn affects the chewiness of baked wheat products).

Gluten is composed of two different proteins:
- gliadin (a prolamin protein)
- glutenin (a glutelin protein).

Though "true gluten" is sometimes defined as being specific to wheat, gluten is often said to be part of other cereal grains — including
rye
&
barley

— because these grains also contain protein composites made from prolamins and glutelins.

GLUTEN
Some people are gluten-intolerant, meaning their bodies produce an abnormal immune response when it breaks down gluten from wheat and related grains during digestion.
The most well-known form of gluten intolerance is
CELIAC DISEASE

When someone with Celiac disease consumes gluten, it triggers an
immune response
that damages or destroy the villi in the small intestine, preventing them from absorbing vital nutrients and in some case causes malnutrition

- rare type
- it's a classic food allergy to wheat allergens marked by
skin
respiratory
gastrointestinal reactions
Wheat allergy
Other types

After consuming gluten, patients with gluten sensitivity may experience many celiac disease symptoms:
diarrhea
fatigue
joint pain
But they don't appear to have damaged intestinal villi
Nonceliac gluten sensitivity.
The disease can develop at any point in life, from infancy to late adulthood.

In children, malabsorption can affect growth and development.



There's no cure for Celiac disease , but following a strict
gluten-free diet
can help manage symptoms and promote intestinal healing.

Patients must avoid eating any foods and ingredients that contain gluten.
Treatment
Symptoms
chronic diarrhea
chronic constipation
muscle weakness
dermatitis
anemia
bone loss

According to the FDA any food that is labeled gluten free should contain
less than 20ppm
in order to be safe for consumption, as set by the Codex Alimentarius Commission

To screen gluten levels in gluten-free products produced and marketed in Lebanon using RIDASCREEN Gliadin
Aim
RIDASCREEN Gliadin is a sandwich enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative analysis of contamination by prolamins from wheat (
gliadin
), rye (
secalin
), and barley (
hordein
) in gluten-free products.
Experimental procedure
Conclusion
Gluten contamination is a very major problem due to the patients' critical conditions and their strict adherence to a complete gluten free diet.

Therefore, further studies are required to reassess gluten levels in the products used in this study to correct for limitations.

Moreover, screening of other products is also needed since only a portion of several products was tested in this study.
Limitations
Not all samples were duplicated

For each product only one expiry date was used

For each product, only one sample was used

Contaminated sample were not reanalyzed
out of the
87 products
Results

Nagham Abi Ramia
Lea Baddour
Bouchra Hayek
Shereen Taki
By
Supervisor
Dr Hussein Hassan
RIDASCREEN kit instruction manual
Thompson, T. (2004). Gluten Contamination of Commercial Oat Products in the United States. The New England Journal of Medicine, 351, p.2021-2022. Retrieved on March 31, 2014, from: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200411043511924
Gélinas, P., et al. (2007). Gluten contamination of cereal foods in Canada. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 43 (No.7), p. 1245-1252. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365- 2621.2007.01599.x/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=fa lse
Cleroux, C., et al. (2013). Gluten contamination of naturally gluten-free flours and starches used
by Canadians with celiac disease. Food Additives and Contaminant, 30 (No. 12), p. 2017-
2021.

Alimkulov, A. et al. (2011). Gluten contamination in the Canadian commercial oat supply. Food Additives and Contaminants, 28 (6), p. 705-715.


Grace, T., Lee, A.R., Thompson, T. (2010). Gluten Contamination of Grains, Seeds, and
Flours in the United States: A Pilot Study. Journal of American Dietetic Association, 110 (6), p. 937-940.

References
Gélinas, P., et al. (2007). Gluten contamination of cereal foods in Canada. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 43 (No.7), p. 1245-1252. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365- 2621.2007.01599.x/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=fa lse

Thompson, T. (2004). Gluten Contamination of Commercial Oat Products in the United States. The New England Journal of Medicine, 351, p.2021-2022. Retrieved on March 31, 2014, from: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200411043511924

Cleroux, C., et al. (2013). Gluten contamination of naturally gluten-free flours and starches used
by Canadians with celiac disease. Food Additives and Contaminant, 30 (No. 12), p. 2017-2021

Alimkulov, A. et al. (2011). Gluten contamination in the Canadian commercial oat supply. Food Additives and Contaminants, 28 (6), p. 705-715.

Grace, T., Lee, A.R., Thompson, T. (2010). Gluten Contamination of Grains, Seeds, and
Flours in the United States: A Pilot Study. Journal of American Dietetic Association, 110 (6), p. 937-940.

Castro, J. (2013, September 17). What Is Gluten?. In Live Science. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from http://www.livescience.com/39726-what-is-gluten.html

Food and Drug Administration. (2011). In . (Ed.), FDA reopens comment period on proposed ‘gluten-free’ food labeling rule. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm265838.htm

Mahan, K. L., Escot-Stump, S., & Raymond, J. L. (2011). Krause's Food and the Nutrition Care Process (13th ed., pp. 618-624).




Mahan, K. L., Escot-Stump, S., & Raymond, J. L. (2011). Krause's Food and the Nutrition
Care Process (13th ed., pp. 618-624).
Castro, J. (2013, September 17). What Is Gluten?. In Live Science. Retrieved March 31,
2014, from http://www.livescience.com/39726-what-is-gluten.html

Mahan, K. L., Escot-Stump, S., & Raymond, J. L. (2011). Krause's Food and the Nutrition
Care Process (13th ed., pp. 618-624).
Castro, J. (2013, September 17). What Is Gluten?. In Live Science. Retrieved March 31,
2014, from http://www.livescience.com/39726-what-is-gluten.html
Castro, J. (2013, September 17). What Is Gluten?. In Live Science. Retrieved March 31,
2014, from http://www.livescience.com/39726-what-is-gluten.html
Hypothesis
Due to the high occurence of gluten contamination as well as lack of control in some countries, we suspect that some gluten free products contain gluten above the recommended level
< 10mg/kg or ppm
Full transcript