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Pose, Pause, Pounce and Bounce

Good to Outstanding Questioning.
by

jayne cheslin

on 14 January 2013

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Transcript of Pose, Pause, Pounce and Bounce

Pause Pounce Bounce Pose @teachertoolkit Ask another student B their opinion of student A's answer (immediately) after the Pounce response. Choose a student. Ask them to answer the question straight away. PPPB (Pose, Pause, Pounce, Bounce) is a simple, yet sophisticated, AfL (Assessment for Learning) questioning technique to help teachers move from good-to-outstanding.

It also helps address differentiation in the classroom and encourages teachers to slow down, take risks and tease out understanding… What is it? Pose,Pause,Pounce and Bounce Can you muster a Tigger-like
Bounce in your classroom? Insist on hands down before the question is delivered.
Provide a question or a series of questions, ensuring that you ask the students to remain reflective.

Use Bloom's to design differentiated questions and target different stuents. Pose the question to the class; not an individual. Keep them reflecting for as long as possible While the class are thinking, you can decide which student will answer the question. Hold the silence. Don't be afraid. Take risks. Pause This is the difficult part. To stop talking… If students are captivated and engaged, try holding the silence for a little while longer (take a calculate risk) and... Still push the boundaries. Keep the reflection for as long as possible….before you, Ask the class to hold the thought... think... and think again... Pause This is the difficult part. To stop talking… If students are captivated and engaged, try holding the silence for a little while longer (take a calculate risk) and... Still push the boundaries. Keep the reflection for as long as possible….before you, Ask the class to hold the thought... think... and think again... Name the student and don't move from them… Don't speak and nip any comments, grunts or noises in the bud! Its magic when you can hear, see and feel a captivated learning audience. We've all seen it. Wait for an answer... pause... decipher the support needed, especially if no response is evidently on its way.

If the student does manage to answer, the fun part starts here... You can ask other students their opinion of the first student's answer.

E.g. Liam, what do you think of Chloe's answer? This ensures the teacher is engaging a significant number of students with the question at hand, whilst using this strategy. Don't accept student's shouting out the answer to maintain pace or behaviour.

Don't ask the question to a student you know will be able to answer!!

If you have not teased out the answer you want, return to pose and pause. Then... Pounce Pounce Pounce Pounce Pounce
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