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Grammar - Thornton Prezi

Sophomore Accel English
by

Allison Doami

on 14 May 2013

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Transcript of Grammar - Thornton Prezi

Dangling/Misplaced Modifiers By:
Allison Doami
Danica Chong
Rebecca Bacich Avoiding Misplaced Modifiers How to use Commas with Modifiers Comma Placement Example More Examples Fix Sentence! Identify your dangling modifier/subject What is a Modifier? Examples of Dangling Modifiers: Intro to Modifiers A modifier describes, clarifies, or gives more detail about a topic. Incorrect:
ex) After reading the study, the article remains convincing. ex) Not having measured the correct amounts, the experiment was a failure. Not having measured the correct amounts, the student failed the experiment. ex) Not having measured the correct amounts, the experiment was a failure. ex) Hoping to excuse my lateness, the note was written and given to my professor. If a sentence begins with a modifier phrase, it should be followed by a comma. Falling down the mountain, Rebecca was scared that the rocks would fall on the campsite. Ask yourself... A modifier can easily change the meaning of a sentence if it is misplaced.
I almost failed every math class I took.
I failed almost every math class I took. Examples: *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences Can you find the differences in meaning? The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. What is a Misplaced Modifier? A misplaced modifier modifies something you didn't intend to modify/describe. What is a Dangling Modifier? A dangling modifier describes something that isn't even in the sentence. Usually you are implying the subject and taking for granted that your reader will know what you mean. Correct:
ex) After reading the study, I find the article to remain convincing. The article is not the subject. It did not read the study. "I" is the subject. You are reading the study. *dangling modifier Subject: experiment Does the subject match the modifier? Verb: having measured Dangling modifier: not having measured the correct amounts NO! the experiment cannot measure The experiment cannot measure. A person measures
the experiment. The students (actual subject) measure the amounts. The experiment does not measure the amounts. Examples: Process: Identify the modifier "falling down the mountain" Ask yourself: Does Rebecca fall down the mountain? Or do the rocks fall down? Correct: Falling down the mountain, the rocks threatened the camp and scared Rebecca. Replace the subject to correct the meaning of the sentence! Ex) The torn student's book lay on the table. The student isn't torn! The book is! Ex) The student's torn book lay on the table. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. A modifier can be... An adverb:
Ex) I hardly studied for my AP Euro test. An adjective:
Ex) I have hard AP Euro tests every week from Mr. Kloes. Ex) After eating dinner, ice cream sounded good. Who ate dinner? The ice cream did not eat dinner. Correct: After eating dinner, I thought ice cream sounded good. ex) Not having measured the correct amounts, the experiment was a failure. ex) Hoping to excuse my lateness, I wrote the note and gave it to my professor. ex) After reading the comic book, the movie based on it was going to be great. ex) After reading the comic strip, I thought the movie based on it was going to be great. ex) She saw a kitten and a puppy on the way to the store. Incorrect: While driving to Starbucks, the storm started. Even though the subject ("the storm") immediately follows the comma, the subject does not agree with the modifier.Therefore making the modifier a dangling modifier. The subject that agrees with the modifier should immediately follow the comma. It can also be:
present participles: verb + ing
past participle: verb + ed
adjective clauses: which begins with that, which, or who
passive voice: form of be + past participle + by On the way to the store, she saw a kitten and a puppy. ex) They just said it's going to rain on the radio. On the radio, they just said it's going to rain. More Examples: ex) Writing carefully, the essay was finished in time to hand in. ex) Crowded in the car, the trip was uncomfortable. ex) Confused by complicated wording, the contract made no sense. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Left alone in the house, the thunderstorm terrified the two small children. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Sipping slowly, Timothy enjoyed the hot soup at the diner counter. The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! A fish was found in the Pacific Ocean that had been considered extinct. The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Peeling the banana, this snack satisfied Jackie's hunger. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Struggling with the tight jeans, the zipper would not budge. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Drooling in anticipation of the treat, Gizmo waited for Sylvia to reward him with a dog cookie. *Almost is the modifier of the two sentences Evan asked me to go for a ride with him to the beach on the telephone. Gobbling the slice of pizza, Squiggle's growling stomach stopped its complaints. Squeezing from the bottom of the tube, Gert splattered the mirror with toothpaste. Correct! Incorrect.
Correct Sentence: A fish that had been considered extinct was found in the Pacific Ocean. Correct! Correct! Incorrect
Correct Sentence: Peeling the banana, Jackie satisfied her hunger with the snack. Incorrect
Correct Sentence: Struggling with the tight jeans, Eric could not make the zipper budge. Incorrect
Correct Sentence: Gobbling the slice of pizza, Squiggle quieted his growling stomach. Incorrect
Correct Sentence: Left alone in the house, the two small children were terrified by the thunderstorm. Correct: While driving to Starbucks, I noticed that the storm started. The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. A correctly used modifier clarifies your true intention of the subject and the topic.
It specifies who the doer is so that there won't be any confusion of who is doing the action. Correct! Why are Properly Placed Modifiers important? Why are recognizing Dangling modifiers important? You can't EVER assume that the reader knows who or what you are trying to talk about.
Recognizing dangling modifiers will help you clearly state your true intention of the sentence. *Almost is the modifier in these two sentences. The modifier should be immediately after or before the thing you want it to modify. Scholar Quiz! Writing carefully, the student finished the essay in time to hand in. Crowded in the car, we were uncomfortable during the trip. Confused by the complicated wording, we couldn't make sense of the contract. The first one means that you passed every class but you were close to failing them
The second one means that you failed most of your classes and passed a few. Scholar Quiz! Correct! Thank you! Incorrect
Correct Sentence: On the telephone, Evan asked me to go on a ride with him to a beach.
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