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Fahrenheit 451

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colin Williams

on 26 August 2014

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Transcript of Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451
Ray Bradbury
Major Characters
Guy Montag
The Story's protagonist

A third generation fireman who's profession is to burn down any houses containing books

Leads a dull home life, can barely communicate with his wife, Mildred
Captain Beatty
The Captain of Montag's fire department

Is wise and well read, although his job is to destroy books

Often gets into Guy's head, at some points even seems to read his mind
Professor Faber
An old, retired English professor

Guy met him years before the book
takes place

Thinks lowly of himself, decribes himself as a "coward"

Ends up being Montag's greatest ally toward the end of the story
Clarisse Mclellan
A teenage girl that Montag encounters several times on his way home from work

She enjoys spending time outside and exploring the world rather than sitting inside all day, which isn't normal behavior

Her family is just like her, and they are considered "outcasts" in normal society

She begins to spark curiosity in Guy about what his life could potentially be, setting the plot of the book in motion
Mildred Montag
Guy's wife

Seems distant and indifferent about her life

Spends all her time watching interactive television shows in the house, and refuses to have any meaningful conversation with her husband

Has obvious detachment from her life, and even attempts suicide early in the novel, but later denies it and pretends it never happened
Minor Characters
Granger
: Leader of the small group of scholars Guy encounters at the end of the story. His group is dtermined to keep books alive in the future. He is patient and calm, and didn't think twice about welcoming Guy into his group.

Mrs. Bowels
: One of Mildred's friends, who thinks on a similar intelligence plane as her. She has been through several husbands and has two children that despise her, but shows no concern.

Stoneman
: One of Guy's co-workers. He enjoys his job, and follows orders with no question.

Black
: Another co-worker with the same personality as Stoneman. Guy plants a book in Black's home at the end of the book, in an attempt to seek revenge on the fire company.

Mrs Phelps
: Anther one of Mildred's friends, she is just like her and Mrs. Bowels. Mrs. Phelps is rather unconcerned and uncarring about her third husband, who was just sent off to war.
Setting
The setting of Fahrenheit 451 is in an unspecified city, in the United States, and also takes place many years in the future.

At the end of the book, the setting shifts from the city to the fields and wilderness outside the city, where Guy meets Granger and his group.
What is the significance of the setting?
The setting of
Fahrenheit 451
is significant to the story because it shapes the plot. In a world where technology practically lives your life for you, any one who is capable of thinking intuitively and freely is exiled, but everybody who behaves "normally" is never questioned. The society of the story is so advanced, that they have become lazy and indifferent. When Guy Montag attempts to break the mold of society, he is labeled an outcast and driven away. If the book were to take place today, none of the conflicts present in the story would ever take place because humans today behave far differently from the humans in Ray Bradbury's world.
The Plot
Guy Montag begins the story as a normal man, whose job is to burn down houses containing books, which are banned in his society.

He is content with his life, but everything changes when he meets Clarisse on his way home from work one night.

Clarisse makes Guy reevaluate his life by asking him many innocent questions that carry deeper meanings to Guy.

The more Guy talks to Clarisse, the more he begins to realize his dissatisfaction with his life and the choices he's made.

Soon after this, several alarming events take place that farther confuse him.
The Plot (Cont.)
First, his wife, Mildred, attempts suicide by swallowing pills. She has her stomach pumped to two, cold, uncaring men, and lives. She refuses to even acknowledge these events for the rest of the story.

Soon after, when Montag is on call to burn down a house containing books, he witnesses a woman who burned to death with her books, rather than leaving her house. This disturbs Montag greatly.

He also realizes that he has not seen Clarisse in a long time, but when he asks around, he discovers that she was hit by a car and killed.

All of these events drive Guy over the edge, and he goes to read all the books we discover he has hid in his house.

Guy does not go to work because of this, and his Cheif, Captain Beatty, pays him a visit.


The Plot (Cont.)
He explains why books are outlawed, and allows Guy a day or so to read some of the books he has, and then burn them after. Beatty stated that it was a common occurence for a fireman to become curious about the books, and was not going to arrest Guy.

Guy asks his wife to read some books with him, but she is too interested in her television shows to show any real interest to her husband.

He then remembers Professor Faber, a man he had met many years ago. He seeks him out to help interpret his books.

Faber agrees to help Guy study his books, and together, they plan to frame other firemen by planting books in their houses. Faber stays hidden while guy is out in the city, and they communicate through small two way radios in the form of ear pieces.

Guy returns home, and finds his wife and two of her friends tastelessly discussing the war that is about to commence.

Disgusted by their manor, Guy takes out a book and reads a poem to them. Offended, the women go to file a complaint against Guy.



The Plot (Cont)
Guy returns to the firehouse to give one of his books back to Captain Beatty.

Before he even knows what hit him, Beatty throws around quotes from many books to confuse Guy.

Just as Guy can take no more, Beatty stops, and they hear the alarm bell ring.

The firemen begin driving to their next job, which turns out to be Guy's own home.

Beatty has Guy burn down his own house. He witnesses his wife leave in a taxi, and realizes she called alarm on her own home.
The Plot (Cont)
Beatty arrests Guy after the destruction of his house, but Guy turns the flamethrower on Beatty, and kills him. He knocks out the surrounding fireman and flees.

Guy is pursued by helicopters, a T.V. crew, and the Mechanical Hound, a robot that hunts and takes out targets based on their scent.

Guy visits Faber one last time before fleeing, where he changes clothes to try to confuse the Hound.

Guy retreats into the woods before he is found, and eventually meets up with Granger and his group of "Book people". They all memorize books in an attempt to preserve the future of humanity the best they can.


This book was written for the high school or adult reader. This book is not intended for younger audiences.
Intended Audience
"A book is a loaded gun in the house next door. Burn it. Take the shot from the weapon. Breach man's mind.
Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?"
- Captain Beatty (Page 58)
Powerful Excerpts
"The difference between the man who just cuts lawns and a real gardener is in the touching, he said. The lawn-cutter might just as well not have been there at all; the gardener will be there a lifetime." - Granger (Page 157)
"We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy. Something's missing." - Guy Montag (Page 82)
What is the significance of the title?
451 degrees Fahrenheit is the temperature at which book-paper burns, according to Ray Bradbury. Since the entire book revolves around book burning, the title
Fahrenheit 451
is fitting to the story itself.
Interesting Facts About Fahrenheit 451
In the movie version of the book, Mildred Montag and Clarisse McClellan are played by the same actress, Julie Christie.

The title of the book was originally
The Fireman
, but was the later changed to
Fahrenheit 451
.

Ray Bradbury wrote the novel in just nine days, using a typewriter in the basement of a library.
"This is a book of warning. It is a reminder that what we have is valuable, and that sometimes we take what we value for granted"
- Neil Gaiman, Fahrenheit 451 introduction
Ray bradbury, the author of Fahrenheit 451 (left)

Julie Christie, who played
both Clarisse and Mildred (right)
Who would enjoy this book?
I think my friend Logan Spevak would enjoy
Fahrenheit 451
the most. I will hand in the completed essay to you in school.
General Information
Created by Colin Williams for Mr. Smink

Book Title: Fahrenheit 451

Author: Ray Bradbury

Number of Pages: 175 (including afterword)

Lexile Level: 890

Project Title: Prezi
The End
"Montag picked a single small volume from the floor. 'Where do we begin?' He opened the book halfway and peered at it. 'We begin by beginning, I guess' "
By Colin Williams
Full transcript