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Chapter 5Researching and Evaluating Internet Information

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by

Sarah Atkins

on 21 September 2012

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Transcript of Chapter 5Researching and Evaluating Internet Information

Consider the vastness of the Library of Congress...the internet makes that look small. Internet users in the United States conducted 213 million searches a day in March 2006. By May 2005, the search engine Google reported it was indexing over 8 billion Web pages, with the number growing every day. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. Never before has information being so readily available. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. Information Literacy as Learning Goal Teachers and Students need educational information. Teachers need the constant access to current, interesting, and relevant information. ICT literacy: the ability to use digital information, communication tools and networks appropriately to solve information problems in order to function in an information society. They use information to write papers and essays, prepare for exams, develop personal talents, and propel their personal conquest for knowledge. For students, educational information is the currency of learning. Teachers want their students to approach a subject with fluency. Meaning, to approach a task or topic as an expert would. Connecting fluency to expertise suggests that children will gain a high level of thinking about technology. Search Engines and How they Work Information research and retrieval: the process of searching within a document collection for a particular information need. Electronic note taking uses computer technologies to organize and expedite note taking. Google, Yahoo!, MSN, AOL, ASK, and BING were the most widely used search engines. Internet searches benefit from knowing sound techniques, useful tips, and sensible shortcuts, and having good tools and a critical prospective. Search engines retrieve information through the Internet. ALL ABOUT GOOGLE It is one of the most visited internet sites worldwide. Google is using its immense popularity to expand into many services. I.e.: google docs, google drive, gmail. Google is working with many libraries to make out of print books and related sources in those collections searchable through the Google site. Did you know that Google has a shopping site called Froogle? However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. Searches
Free Text Search: a useful way to search because you will get entries covering many aspects of a topic.
Boolean Search: using search terms AND, OR, AND NOT.
Keyword/Exact Match Search: retrieves only resources that contain exactly the word or phrase you type into the text box. Consider the vastness of the Library of Congress...the internet makes that look small. Internet users in the United States conducted 213 million searches a day in March 2006. By May 2005, the search engine Google reported it was indexing over 8 billion Web pages, with the number growing every day. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. Never before has information being so readily available. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. h Strategies for Conducting Effective Searches with Students Introduce Students to Internet Information Search Sites Designed for Students Inquire how your students search for information online. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. The teacher could ask the students to identify unheard voices or untold stories that aren't found in Wiki or a traditional encyclopedia. Use Visual Search Tools Internet users in the United States conducted 213 million searches a day in March 2006. By May 2005, the search engine Google reported it was indexing over 8 billion Web pages, with the number growing every day. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. Never before has information being so readily available. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. -When students are able to find and understand the materials they find online, they learn how to access the information themselves. Information Problems & Responses Misinformation: false, out of date, or incomplete in a misleading way. Malinformation is what reasonable people might consider bad or harmful information. Mostly useless information focuses on the trivial, the mundane, and the eccentric. We need either all or some of the following for students and teachers alike to have a positive time researching. Censorship, filtering software, partitions, labels, and critical thinking. Messed up information is poorly organized and presented. Ex: Long lists of data without synthesis or context, discussion boards or blogs that feature text rambling on without a clear focus or topic. Consider the vastness of the Library of Congress...the internet makes that look small. Internet users in the United States conducted 213 million searches a day in March 2006. By May 2005, the search engine Google reported it was indexing over 8 billion Web pages, with the number growing every day. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. Never before has information being so readily available. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. g All ABOUT WIKIPEDIA h Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia with a worldwide collection of authors. It's designed to be an effort to create and distribute a free encyclopedia of the highest possible quality to every single person on the planet in their own language. Many people trust Wiki as a reliable source, yet some do not. One could 'fast-check' the Wikipedia entries. If errors are found, then they could submit revisions on the site. Wiki has become the 3rd most popular news and information site, only following Yahoo! and CNN. Compare Wikipedia with other encyclopedias and see how it compares. Criteria for Evaluating Web Sources Accuracy refers to the overall reliability of the information on the site by giving a clear description of who authored the sites and for what purposes. Authority is indicating the credentials of the author(s) as well as for the nature of the site. Currency means that the site is up to date with recent information and updates are indicated. If the site can be viewed easily without difficulty or commercial messages that would be known as coverage. Objectivity tests whether the information of the site is fair and non biased. .mil:is for military organizations Do you think YOUR students will know URL's?
(Uniform Resource Locator) .com: for a commercial business .org: for a non profit organization. .edu: designed for schools and colleges. .net: means the site is a network provider. .gov: reserved for sited created by the governmental agencies. Consider the vastness of the Library of Congress...the internet makes that look small. Internet users in the United States conducted 213 million searches a day in March 2006. By May 2005, the search engine Google reported it was indexing over 8 billion Web pages, with the number growing every day. Researchers estimated that enough new information was stored through print, film, magnetic, and optical storage media to fill 37,000 new libraries the size of Library of Congress book collection. Never before has information being so readily available. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. Avoiding Plagiarism Problems Plagiarism is defined as the direct copying or misrepresenting of someone's work. Plagiarizing materials from the web is and can be a huge problem. Students want good grades on high-stake tests and college placement exams. This leads to the potential for plagiarism. Misasumptions by a student creates plagiarism. Some student's don't understand that every piece of information that is not their own needs to be cited. However, with all this information available, plagiarism is a major issue. Teachers have a way of preventing plagiarism by subscribing to a variety of different websites that scan for plagiarized work. There are different lessons plans
teachers could use to 1. avoid plagiarism
and 2. practice and use technology.
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