Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

ESL presentation

A summary of the main features of the NSW HSC course
by

Daniel Kent

on 8 June 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ESL presentation

11.3 Rationale
The English (ESL) courses address the needs of a specific group of students. The courses complement the English (Standard) courses and the English (Advanced) courses, and share the overall aim and rationale of English. When presented at the HSC, the English (ESL) courses will satisfy Board of Studies requirements for the study of English.

The English (ESL) courses provide students with the opportunity to become effective, creative and confident communicators in English and to assist them in achieving Stage 6 outcomes. They will be able to respond to and compose texts for a variety of purposes and audiences that are relevant to their personal, educational, social and vocational lives. Students extend their reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing skills through an integrated engagement with texts drawn from literature and other sources.

The candidature for English (ESL) courses has a wide diversity of experience in English and in their other languages. The English (ESL) courses are designed to allow for the development of flexible programs that address this diversity of need and background.
Students for whom these courses are intended bring to the classroom varied cultural backgrounds that provide ideas and language experiences to be valued and used in the classroom. Wherever possible, teachers should incorporate students’ cultural and language experiences as resources for addressing the objectives of the courses.
The English (ESL) courses assist students to participate more effectively in Australian education and society by providing students with the opportunity to learn English in varied, relevant, authentic and challenging contexts. This development of English language skills, knowledge and understanding, and engagement with literature, will increase students’ understanding of the diversity and values of Australian and other cultures. By completion students will be able to respond to and compose texts for a variety of purposes and audiences that are relevant to their personal, educational, social and vocational lives. (Very similar outcomes to Advanced and Standard courses) Students have a wide diversity of experience in English...Wherever possible, teachers should incorporate students’ cultural and language experiences as resources for addressing the objectives of the courses. The course assists students to participate more effectivelly in Australian education and society...This development of English language skills, knowledge and understanding, and engagement with literature, will increase students’ understanding of the diversity and values of Australian and other cultures. Rationale: A comprehensive course for a diverse candidature, focusing on language skills. English (ESL) Preliminary HSC Area of Study Electives Area of Study Modules Students acquire and develop their English language skills, knowledge and understanding through exploration of an idea or process represented in texts. 60% of content Fairly flexible- The focus is on developing 'English language skills' through examining how meaning is shaped. 40% of content Cannot duplicate HSC modules or texts Journeys/belonging etc. Required to :
- study Australian and other texts

-explore a range of types of text drawn from prose fiction, drama, poetry, nonfiction, film, media or multimedia texts

-undertake wide reading programs involving texts and textual forms composed in and for a wide variety of contexts

-integrate the modes of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing as appropriate

-engage in the integrated study of language and text. Same requirements as Standard and Advanced courses Text Requirements
The study of AT LEAST THREE TYPES OF PRESCRIBED TEXTS drawn from:

prose fiction, drama, poetry, nonfiction, film OR media OR multimedia texts

a wide range of additional related texts and textual forms Fiction
Baillie, Allen- 'The China Coin'
Nonfiction
Pung, Alice, 'Unpolished Gem'
Multimedia (mm)
Multicultural Programs Unit, NSW Dept of Education and Training, Making Multicultural Australia, www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au (mm) Belonging Texts: Short responses.
1. If you are not familiar with the cultural origins of the terms 'Sunday Roast' or 'Tandoori', research these two terms. What is the effect of linking these two meals in the advertisement?
2. How are two different cultural groups represented visually in the advertisement?
3. Who is the intended audience? Who might be excluded from this text and why?
Long response.
4. How does this advertisement challenge or support your perception of belonging? Consider how notions of identity, relationships, acceptance and understanding are constructed in the text. Outcomes:
3 A student demonstrates understanding of cultural references in texts
5 A student demonstrates understanding of how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts Australian Voices Australian Visions Module A: Experience through language Module B: Texts and Society Living and Working Academic English 50% of content Students study two prescribed texts, and additional texts of their own choosing This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of belonging is considered and expressed in and through texts. Through close language study, and by experimenting with different language choices, students will examine how perceptions of belonging, or not belonging, vary. Unpolished Gem- memoir. Quote from a book review.
'The book begins as the ethnic Chinese Pung family arrive in Australia from Cambodia, fleeing the Khmer Rouge. Immigrants to this country have a vast range of stories to tell, but they have a more complex narrative formed by the experience of life as links between the old country and the new.

Over time various ethnic groups have arrived and congregated in tight-knit communities for a while: Irish, Italian, Greek and, of course, Anglo Saxon. All have merged into the dominant Australian culture; significantly all have provided top footballers, politicians, chefs and writers, the first being a more reliable indicator of cultural integration than the last two. But Chinese Australians and other East Asians have been more inclined towards business and medicine than footy. However admirable their achievements, it takes a book like this to help bridge the wider Australian culture and the old ways.'
http://www.theage.com.au/news/book-reviews/unpolished-gem/2006/09/01/1156817080625.html Most of the prescribed texts are taken from the Standard and Advanced
courses. There are however, less texts to choose from (no Dickens or
Shakespeare) and a few notable additions. Challenges: Need to cover the same outcomes through less content
Diversity in students' abilities and backgrounds- teachers are expected to be flexible, keeping the content culturally relevant and accessible to all students
A major focus of the course is preparing students for either 'Academic' study or 'Living and Working' (see modules)- another potential challenge with a diverse candidature In their responding and composing students explore the ways in which language is used to represent voices in texts. They consider the different types of voices evident in texts and how the creation of a distinctly Australian voice, or voices, affects interpretation and shapes meaning. Students will examine one prescribed text, in addition to other texts and examples drawn from their own experience. How language represents voices, and the creation of a distinct Australian voice(s). Burke, J C, The Story of Tom Brennan, OR Thomson, Katherine, Diving for Pearls. Fiction: Poetry: Burns, Joanne- 'on a clear day' OR Komninos, Komninos by the cupful Nonfiction : Human Rights Commission, The Stolen Children – Their Stories. Film: The Castle, Rob Stitch In their responding and composing students explore the ways in which language is used to represent visions in texts. They consider the different types of visions evident in texts and how the creation of a distinctly Australian vision, or visions, affects interpretation and shapes meaning. Students will examine one prescribed text, in addition to other texts and examples drawn from their own experience. How language is used to represent visions in texts,

and the creation of a distinct Australian vision Fiction: Poetry: Drama: Film: Goldsworthy, Peter, Maestro Misto, John, The Shoe-Horn Sonata Stewart, Douglas, Selected Poems Luhrmann, Baz, Strictly Ballroom, Fox, 1992 (f)
Cox, Deb, Seachange – Series 2, ABC, 2004 (m) This module requires students to explore and analyse texts used in a specific situation. It assists students’ understanding of the ways that texts communicate information, ideas, bodies of knowledge, attitudes and belief systems in ways particular to specific areas of society. This module requires students to explore the uses of a particular aspect of language. It develops students’ awareness of language and helps them to understand how our perceptions of and relationships with others and the world are shaped in written, spoken and visual language. In this elective students explore the kinds of texts that are widely used in the workplace and the community. They respond to and compose texts appropriate to specific situations designed to meet students’ needs and interests. They consider what these texts imply about the nature of the workplace or the community in which they are used.

Students are required to read and respond to a range of types of texts, including: job advertisements; applications and other forms; information brochures and technical manuals; news reports and editorials; feature articles; advertisements; web pages; speeches and interviews; and other relevant texts. They are required to compose a range of types of texts, including: job application letters and personal résumés; work and accident reports; letters to the editor; letters of complaint, appreciation and request; advertisements and information brochures; feature articles; web pages; speeches and interviews; and other relevant texts. Students are also required to identify and explain the purposes and language techniques used in these types of texts.

Students are to supplement this study with texts of their own choosing related to the elective. The support document, Workplace and Community Texts (see www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au), provides examples of types of texts and may further supplement students’ study of this elective. Designed to assist students in negotiating
workplace and community texts. A wide range of texts are to be examined including:
Job advertisements/applications
Information brochures and technical manuals
Newspapers
Web pages and advertisements Students compose a similarly broad range of texts, including: job applications, letters to council/editors, advertisements, feature articles, interviews etc. Texts are chosen by students. A support document is
available on BOS website to assist with this. In this elective students explore the kinds of texts that are widely used in formal learning situations. They respond to and compose texts appropriate to particular learning situations relevant to students’ needs and interests. They consider what these texts imply about the construction of knowledge in particular fields of study.Students are required to read and respond to a range of types of texts, including: academic reports and essays; text books; discussions and expositions; scientific, artistic and literary texts; examination and research tasks; web pages; oral presentations; interviews; and other relevant texts. They are required to compose a range of types of texts, including: academic reports and essays; discussions and expositions; learning journals and process diaries; reviews; web pages; oral presentations; notes and summaries; and other relevant texts. Students are also required to identify and explain the purposes and language forms and features used in these types of texts.Students are to supplement this study with texts of their own choosing related to the elective. The support document, Academic English, (see www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au), provides examples of types of texts and may further supplement students’ study of this elective. This module examines the academic texts that students may come across in their future studies Students are able to focus on areas of particular interest, however, a wide range of texts should be read and responded to, including: reports and essays, scientific, artistic and literary texts. Texts are chosen by students. A support document is
available on BOS website to assist with this. http://hsc.csu.edu.au/english/area_of_study/belonging/4002/china_coin.htm#vocab A unit of work on the China Coin can be found at: Activities include: Vocabulary development through word bank activities; scaffolding the composition of sentences, cloze passages as chapter summaries,
plot sequencing etc.
A final task that relates the text to the idea of belonging. Think about the following questions:

How do the voices in The Stolen Children: Their Stories reflect and appeal to Australian values?
Are there particular voices that strongly appeal to particular values?
Consider how the following voices in the book appeal to particular Australian values:
Carmel Bird - respect for the equal worth, dignity and freedom of the individual and justice
The Stories/ Voices - compassion, justice
John Howard - egalitarianism
Kim Beazley - justice
Does John Howard convince the responder that he believes in the Australian value of compassion for those in need and justice? Why or why not? (From HSC online) Summary of key Australian values in The Stolen Children: Their Stories
Look at the following list of some of the Australian values listed in the Australian Government's Department of Immigration and Citizenship's 2007 book "Life in Australia ".

'Respect for the equal worth, dignity and freedom of the individual
A spirit of Egalitarianism - everyone deserves a "fair go" and justice
Compassion for those in need
Justice for all people - equality
Freedom of speech (the right to speak and to be heard)
Any other Australian values?
Full transcript