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German food project

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by

Erin Anderson

on 5 September 2013

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Transcript of German food project

Germany
What are the major foods of the country (rice or wheat? Fruit or nuts? Meat or vegetables? etc.) What are the main dishes the country is noted for? What cooking techniques are most common?
Nutritional Profile
43rd fattest country in world
More obese people in Germany than in United States, Spain, and United Kingdom
67.1% of all men between 18 and 79 are considered overweight with a BMI of 25 or greater
Used to have the highest obesity level for children until Italy surpassed Germany
Has most overweight adults in Europe
14% live healthy lifestyle, 25% meet obesity levels
Causes: Food and Drinks, Genes, Marriage
Size and Caloric Content
"Breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper"
Erik Martin
Julia Plants
Alice Lu
David Eber
Erin Anderson

What is the nutritional profile of the majority of the people? What is the size and caloric content of typical meals? What are the main diet-related health issues?
What agricultural products does the country produce? What type of agricultural system do they have—modern, traditional, some mix? Do they export their crops or are they consumed at home? Are they dependent on agricultural exports, or agricultural imports?
How do people eat? What are the cultural customs, practices, and rituals? Who prepares the meal? This should include both everyday practices and those reserved for holidays and/ or religious feasts.
What kind of influences from the rest of the world have shaped the cuisine, the culture, the farming systems? How and to what degree is this country’s food and agriculture globalized? This could include attention to spices, crops, cooking techniques, religion, technology, etc.
MEALS
HOLIDAYS
FESTIVALS
TABLE MANNERS
TRADITIONAL
MEALS
Fruhstuck
Mittagessen
Kaffee und kuchen
Abendbrot
FRUSTUCK
breakfast
breads & rolls
honey
jam
coffee or tea
muesli
MITTAGESSEN
lunch
eaten between 12 and 1 o'clock
largest meal of the day
typically consists of potatoes, vegetables, and meat
smallest and longest meal of the day
social affair
typically consists of:
KAFFEE UND
KUCHEN
coffee and cake
Sunday afternoon snack
social event
type of cake depends largely on season
ABENDBROT
dinner
eaten at around 6pm
usually a cold meal served with different kinds of bread, cheese, cold meat, and salad
often accompanied by black or herbal tea
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Christmas
New Year's
Easter
Oktoberfest
WEIHNACHTEN
Christmas
most celebrated holiday in Germany
very similar to Christmas in the US
Christmas meal:
very extravagent
typically includes goose (weihnachtsganz), carp (weihnachtskarpfen), and cheese fondue
ST. NIKOLAUS
DAY
December 6th
St. Nikolaus is said to sneak into houses and leave children candy, chocolate, fruits, and toys in their shoes and stockings that they leave outside their door.
ADVENT
Wreaths & Calendars
Christmas Markets
CHRISTKINDLMARKT
open-air winter markets
vendors sell Christmas related goods such as ornaments, wreaths, candles, and Nativity sets
lots of food and drink!
Lebkuchen
Spekulatius
Christollen
Gluhwein
Gluhmost
Punsch
gingerbread
short bread
fruitcake w/sugar
mulled wine
hot apple cider
Christmas punch
OKTOBERFEST
Started in 1810
16-18 day festival held in Munich
Largest public festival in the world
Lots of food and beer
TERMINOLOGY
"O 'zapft is!"
Ein prosit
"Wiesn"
"the keg is tapped!"
the toast before drinking;
either "prost" (cheers) or "zum wohl" (to your health)
what the locals call the festival
Doner Kebab
The most popular fast food is Doner Kebab (even replacing brats or Knockwurst in many places), which is Turkish in origin. Typically changed to veal and chicken from traditional Turkish lamb. Frequently also use German sauce like Kräutersoße.
Turks came over during the Wirtschaftswunder after WWII as 'temporary' guest workers. which didn't work out so well. Conflict also exists, often religiously based, such as the wave of neo-nazi anti-turkish attacks dubbed the "döner murders".
Italian Pasta fast food is also popular, as is pizza (often 'germafied').
Imports almost all of it's agricultural vehicles (more known for making 'personal' vehicles).
Net importer of food, such as rice, and of all things maple syrup.
Oranges have cultural significance for St. Nikolaus Day, originally mainly imported from Spain in Medieval times
French food for fine dining is also becoming less popular, where more traditional german food is both cheaper, and better suiting.
Health Risks
Diet high in fat, refined sugars and carbohydrates
Lacking in fruit, vegetables, and dietary fiber
High dietary fat leads to high blood cholesterol which increases chance for heart problems and stroke
Increased sugars and carbohydrates leads to obesity
Specialists estimate 30%-40% of health problems related to diet
Excess weight and lack of activity increase chances for Type 2 Diabetes
Chief agricultural products include milk, pork, beef, poultry, cereals, potatoes, wheat, barley, cabbages, and sugar beets. In some regions wine, fruits, and vegetables, and other horticultural products play an important role.
Germany, like many first-world countries has a predominantly a modern agricultural system. Most food is mass produced, but there are still pockets of traditional farming.

Organic farming is becoming more of a viable option for German farmers, but like most other modernized coutries, its market share will never rival modern-day farming techniquies'.
Busy lives lead young people to eat smaller breakfasts
snack in between (sandwich or yogurt)
Main meal of the day is lunch, 12-2 pm (breads, vegetables, soups, meats, starches)
Light dinner, 6-8 pm (salads, meats, bread, pickles, cheeses)
Coffee and cake for dessert
around 3,530 calories per day for the average german diet
Size and Caloric Content
Generalities
German foods follow the same patterns, but are diverse by region--> same type of meal/style/ingredients, but many local spins
Germany is one of the largest exporters of agricultural products in the EU. But also imports a significant amount from other countries. As one of the most consuming European countries, Germany is not able to self-sufficient.
Meals are hardy and heavy, typically with large portions of meat and bread
Epitome of a
"MEAT-AND-POTATOES" kind of place
Regional differences...
...occur naturally: North, Middle/Central, South
...and unnaturally: Berlin Wall
North:
Meat
HUGE staple in German cuisine
Diverse: Beef, venison, boar, etc.
South:
Middle:
seafood: fish, eel, etc.
known for Westphalian ham
served with mustard, popular with Germans worldwide
Sausages
Brätwurst, many local varieties
Wüstchen- aka Frankfurter
Potatoes
introduced by King Frederick the Great in the 1700's
pretty much used in everything:
Stews. With bacon, apples, and pears. Or one of its main uses:
DUMPLINGS
Knödel (North)
Spätzle (south)
tinier
Grains
served with practically every meal
very flavorful: Rye, Pumpernickel, Sourdough
For Bread
Cereals
Knödel
Central Germany known for its products of rye and buckwheat flour
Fruits
apples
cherries
pears
used with meat in place of vegetables
pears and apples often
paired with bacon
and beans
used in desserts
Black Forest Cake/Black Forest Cherry Cake
Apfelstrudel
Root Vegetables
& Legumes
carrots, potatoes, beets
green beans, white beans,
etc.
Such as
weisse bohnensuppe
white bean soup,
popular in the North
White asparagus
, (technically) a root
characteristic of Mid-Germany. More common is
a very popular
Spargel,
element of Spring cooking
(in soup or with sauce)
Cooking Techniques
style is very simple, true to the food
Boiled
Stewed
Fermented
potatoes, dumplings, meat
...anything
Eintopf
(seafood stew, North)
Pichelsteiner
(three types of meat + potatoes)
Gulasch
(beef, venison, or boar, in red wine)
Sauerkraut
Sauerbraten
Notable Foods
Bratwurst
Sauerbraten
Sauerkraut
Soft Pretzels
Gulasch/Gulaschsuppe
dumplings, Knödel, Spätzle
black forest cake
strudel
muesli
also made with bread
TABLE MANNERS
No elbows on the table
It's considered impolite to leave food on your plate
Don't cut lettuce in a salad, fold it with your knife and fork
Remain standing until invited to sit down
Cut as much of your food with your fork as possible--this compliments the chef by saying the food is tender
Full transcript