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Topic 1 OPEN SOURCES AND LINUX FUNDAMENTALS

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on 23 June 2015

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Transcript of Topic 1 OPEN SOURCES AND LINUX FUNDAMENTALS

OPEN SOURCES AND LINUX FUNDAMENTALS
Open Sources Technology
OSS
can be defined as software distributed under a licensing agreement which allows the source code (computer code) to be shared, viewed and modified by other users and organizations.
Licensed under the General Public License (GPL), open source solutions give customers the flexibility to freely use software without the cost of being locked into any particular vendor's proprietary technology.
Software whose source code is published and made available to the public, enabling anyone to copy, modify and redistribute the source code without paying royalties or fees.
Open Standard
A set of rules and specifications, which collectively describe the design or operating characteristics of a program or device, that is published and made freely available to the technical community
The terms "open" and "standard" have a wide range of meanings associated with their usage. There are a number of definitions of open standards which emphasize different aspects of openness, including of the resulting specification, the openness of the drafting process, and the ownership of rights in the standard.
OSS Licenses
OSS APPLICATION
Conclusion
OSS
Open Sources Software
CSS
Closed Sources Software
OSS vs CSS
is based around the idea that the user can not only view, but change the source code of an application.

is hidden to prevent the user either viewing or changing the code
FREEDOM 1
FREEDOM 2
FREEDOM 3
FREEDOM 4
FREEDOM IN OSS
The freedom to run the program, for any purpose
The freedom to study how the program works, and change it to make it do what you wish

The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor
The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements to the public, so that the whole community benefits
1991
1996
1999
1983
Richard Stallman launched the GNU Project
1991
The Linux kernel, started by Linus Torvalds, as freely modifiable source code

1989
the first version of the GNU General Public License was published

some GNU developers formed the company Cygnus Solutions

1996
KDE was founded by Matthias Ettrich.
1997
1997
Eric Raymond published The Cathedral and the Bazaar, and was one factor in motivating Netscape Communications Corporation to release their popular Netscape Communicator Internet suite today better known as Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird.

1989
1999
Sun Microsystems released the StarOffice office suite as free software under the GNU LGPL. The software was renamed OpenOffice.org, and coexists with StarOffice.

1983
HISTORY OF OSS
OSS Web Resources
OSS Website
Usenet newsgroup
OSS Repository
Forum
Mailing List
http://www.oscc.org.my/
http://www.opensourcewindows.org/
http://sourceforge.net/
http://mirror.oscc.org.my
http://www.opensource.org/lists

http://lists.oscc.org.my/mailman/listinfo
http://webtecker.com/2008/05/02/8-popular-open-source-forums/
http://www.linuxforums.org/
http://www.linux.org/docs/usenet.html
Standard Bodies
IETF
ITU-T
ISO
IEC
The recognized standards bodies that published the standards rules
IETF & ITU-T refer their standards as “open standards” and allow “reasonable and non-discriminatory” patent licensing fee requirements.
Open Standards are free for all to implement, with no royalty or fee. Certification of compliance by the standards organization may involve a fee.
Open Standards create a fair, competitive market for implementations of the standard. They do not lock the customer in to a particular vendor or group.
Open Standards may employ license terms that protect against subversion of the standard by embrace-and-extend tactics. The licenses attached to the standard may require the publication of reference information for extensions, and a license for all others to create, distribute, and sell software that is compatible with the extensions.
Open Standards and the organizations that administer them do not favor one implementer over another for any reason other than the technical standards compliance of a vendor's implementation

Open Standards are available for all to read and implement.
PRINCIPLES OF OPEN STANDARDS
Availability
Maximize End-User Choice
No Royalty
No Discrimination
Predatory Practices
OPEN STANDARD EXAMPLES
System
Hardware
File Formats
Protocols
Programming Languages

Types of OSS Licenses
Commercial
Academic
Community
are available to accredited educational institutions, including vocational/trade schools, colleges, universities and institutions, and to individual students and teaching staff.
it available to legal entities, including companies and organizations (both for-profit and non-profit), requiring the software for general commercial use.
are designed for organizations which are: non-profit, non-government, non-academic, non-commercial, non-political and secular.

OSS Licenses
OSS Licenses
Mozilla Licenses
MIT
GNU LGPL
The GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) allows people to redistribute certain software, but not change its contents. This license is often used for distributing libraries that other application programs depend upon.
The Mozilla license covers use and redistribution of source code associated with the Mozilla Web browser and related software.
BSD
The Berkeley Software Distribution License allows redistribution of source code, with the requirement that the source code keep the BSD copyright notice and not use the names of contributors to endorse or promote derived software without written permission.
The MIT license is like the BSD license, except that it doesn’t include
the endorsement and promotion requirement
Email
Presentation
Animation
Database
Graphics
Impressive

Pointless

MagicPoint

Kpresenter

UltraPoint

PinPoint

c-tree Plus

Empress

Essentia

FairCom Server

INFORMIX-SE

Just Logic/SQL

KE Texpress

Qddb

Raima Database Manager++

Empress Embedded RDBMS

SOLID Server

Velocis Database Server

Yard SQL

Thunderbird
Spicebird
Zimbra
Eudora
ClawsMail
Sylpheed
GIMP
Inkscape
Digikam
K-3D
Jpatch
Bryce

IDL (Interactive Data Language)
Megahedron
Tecplot 7.0
VariCAD
VARKON
XVScan
Full transcript