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Unit 1: Coming of Age

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Ali Francisco

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Transcript of Unit 1: Coming of Age



Retrieve corrected papers from basket. 3 hole punch them.

Journal: 8 minutes
• If you were one of Melinda’s friends, what would your reaction to her “party pooping” ways be? What would you do if one of your friends did something similar? Use your journal template. 8 minutes


Day 6
Journal Prompt:

SSR & HW Check
Success!
9 Honors English
Unit 1: Coming of Age
Review Vocabulary
Components of Voice
Diction
- Word choice intended to convey a certain effect.
Syntax
- Sentence structure; the arrangement of words and the order of grammatical elements in a sentence.
Imagery
- words or phrases that a writer use to represent people, items, actions, feelings, and ideas by appealing to the senses.
New vocabulary : INFERENCE
An inference is a conclusion made about a speaker or a topic based on clues in the text, not solid information or clearly stated ideas.
Sustained Silent Reading 10 minutes- every day
Pick up all corrected work from basket. 3 hole punch it.
You will have a tab in your binder for vocabulary.
Roots- explanation- tests every other Thursday
Speak
Excerpt- P. 9
Paired readings - Take turns reading the excerpt, then work as a group to annotate and highlight examples of narrative voice.
Where can you find the narrative voice in Speak? How does it come across?
How are voice and tone different? (p. 5)
Double Entry Journal
(p. 11) Complete this after you read SPEAK excerpt on p. 9-10

Parallel Structure
Identifying Anaphora:

Defining Parallel Structure...
"Two or more words, phrases, or clauses that are similar in length and grammatical form."
-Used to create a balanced sentence structure by creating a series of words, phrases, or clauses.

CCSS: Determine the meaning of words as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings as well as choices on meaning and tone.
SSR- 10
NEED BOOK< HIGHLIGHTER SIT IN GROUPS
Move to groups and review Faulty parallelism answers.
Literary Terms: Denotation vs. Connotation
ALWAYS highlight and read AC. VOC/LIT terms, KEY IDEAS in margins. It will help narrow your focus
SB 1.5 - DO #1-5 with your group
Highlight Marigolds (pp. 15-22).
Find examples of diction, syntax, imagery, parallelism, and tone. Mark each with a different color.
Diction= Red Syntax= Orange
Imagery= Green Parallelism= Purple
Tone= Yellow
What inferences can you make about the speaker and the events?
Finish Marigolds for Homework.

A memorable form of repetition that... (p. 13)
"I Have a Dream" Quote
Define anaphora after reading the quote closely.
How do syntax and parallelism work together?
Different levels:

Words
Phrases
Clauses
What is a
clause
?
What is a
phrase
?
Faulty Parallelism
Rewrite the following sentences with correct parallelism. Explain in one sentence what was incorrect about the original sentence.

1. Mary likes hiking, to swim, and to ride a bicycle.

2. The teacher said that he was a good student because he took good notes, he studied for tests early, and his labs were completed carefully.

3. The coach told the players that they should get a lot of sleep, that they should not eat too much, and to do some warm-up exercises before the game.

4. The dictionary can be used for these purposes: to find word meanings, pronunciations, correct spellings, and looking up irregular verbs.

Write 3 of your own sentences that use parallelism.
Academic Vocabulary Connotation & Denotation
Connotation- The associations and emotional overtones attached to a word.
Denotation- The precise meaning of a word.
List at least four inferences each about Lizabeth's realizations and attitudes.
Using the graphic organizer on p. 23 identify and record at least two quotes from "Marigolds" that use diction and imagery to convey the author's voice.
Then, complete Check your Understanding Writing Prompt on p. 24.

Reading Bamboo/Bride remainder of the hour.

Due Monday: Index card with THREE NAMES of interview subjects for your Embedded Assessment Interview Narrative. First and last names and which of the requirements they meet. For example, Hanna Engle- Western Michigan University. Plus two others


Writing your introductions:
Using the information from your interviews, write an introduction for your partner. Use one direct quote and one indirect quote from them in your introduction and follow our standard paragraph structure (topic sentence, transitions, examples/quotes, and a conclusion.)

RISE AND READ: W.9-10.10 Write routinesly over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences.

Journal-5; Notice what terms Melinda uses to describe other people. Why does she refer to some only by nicknames while others have their names used? What do you think this means?

Check for understanding activity on pg. 28- using your rough draft from yesterday.

Highlight in different colors examples of DIRECT quotes and INDIRECT quotes in your written introduction.
Annotate your script and explain your quote choices.
Annotate/identify where you used a parallel structure in your introduction.

SSR - 10 minutes
Journal Prompt: 7 minutes
What does the book say Melinda was like in middle school, before the party? Why is everyone (including her parents, teachers, and counselor) quick to call her a “bad kid”? Make sure to use your transition words and highlight them

Partner Introductions



Homework:
Root Test tomorrow
Picture Bride/Bamboo Grove continue Reading
Vocabulary quiz every Tuesday
Conduct your interview and have the questions and the answers by Tuesday.
SSR- 20 - Finish introductions
SB 1.8 Two Versions of One Narrative
Fictional Narrative vs. Nonfiction Narrative
Nonfiction narratives~
Prose(not poetry pieces that have the same elements as fictional stories, but are based on actual characters and events.
Prose and poetry - Read #1 with your group on P. 32 in Before Reading and discuss

Read both selections silently"Always Running" and "Race Politics" by Luis J. Rodriguez
Highlight the examples of diction, imagery, syntax, and voice as you read. Complete DURING READING #2 on p. 32 as you read.
DO: Complete all of the Key Ideas and Details questions with your partner for both selections, pgs.33-36.
DO: Complete the AFTER READING chart on p. 37, AND the Identifying Parallel Structure on same page.

Day 7
Journal Prompt:
How do you find the voice of a piece of writing? What are some clues that help you determine the personality of the speaker?
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading) - 15 minutes
Subject
Occasion (situation)
Audience
Purpose
S3 Subject, Style, Syntax
Tone
SOAPSTone
WORK:
1. Read intro, p. 40, and WMD's on p. 41-42.
Annotate as you read. DO #3 DURING READING as you read. Answer all Key Ideas and Details questions in margin.
2. On page 44, complete#4, 5, and the SOAPSTone chart for "Analysis" on the Chuck Liddel interview titled "WMDs".

FRIDAY
SSR- 10
3. Using the large paper provided, create and complete the SOAPSTone chart on p. 44.
Generate 10-20 open ended questions before you conduct your interview
HOMEWORK over the weekend:
Conduct your Interview using those questions and have them by Tuesday.
Make sure you have/know your computer log in information for next week.
Interview Narrative
Using what you know a narrative is, infer what an "interview narrative" might be.
Day 11
Journal Prompt: 10 minutes; SSR- 10 minutes; Vocab quiz
What do you think is the difference between a logical sequence (topics that make sense when listed together) of questions and a chronological sequence (questions that follow each other and are related in topic or timing) of questions in an interview? When would you use a logical sequence and when would you use a chronological sequence?
CLASsWORK/HOMEWORK
Get a Chromebook and log on. Begin typing the interview narrative. IF you have not interviewed your person, you are falling behind:((
THEN:
Read the two excerpts on page 50, 1.11 Transforming the Transcript; taking the time to do the following:
1. Identify if it is in 1st or 3rd person perspective and explain how you know/mark the textual clues.
2. Highlight sentences that integrate quotes.
3. Underline descriptive information.
4. Circle personal pronouns to help you decipher what perspective it is written in.
Incorporating Quotes
Highlight the different quote tags used in the transcript excerpts. How do they avoid overusing "she said"? List the other terms they use.
RL9-10.6- Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advnace that point of view or purpose.
RI.9-10.5- Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of the text.
RI.9-10.3- Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events,. including the order in which the points are made, howey are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
"WMDs" Photo Inferring
Look at the photo, draw some conclusions about Liddell based off of the article's title, the photo, and the photo caption? Discuss with your group what you think this guy is like, using just the picture you see.
Journal Prompt:
Monday's prompt: Who is the best superhero ever? Why? Back up your argument with some solid facts.
SSR- 10 minutes; Vocab quiz #4.

Follow MLA Format. Use OWLPurdue website
Pick up the PROOFREADING SHEET when you enter.
Hard copy of 2nd rough draft is due Thursday.
Root Test is Thursday; House on Mango test is next Friday.

Final Paper is due on Friday. If you are absent, it is expected that you email me the paper before then end of the school day on Friday. tourdam@bcschools.net Also found on front page of you syllabus. Send as an attachment, not directly in the email.
Is it Logical?
Question Flow-
Look at the order in which the questions were asked. With a partner, list the questions and quickly summarize what order the interviewer asks them in- what topics does he start with, what does he end with? Does the order make sense? Why or why not?
Embedded Assessment Planning
Journal: Stand up to friends or enemies. SSR- 15 minute
Who do you want to interview?

Using your packet, read the directions.
Remembering that the topic you are interviewing them about is
how their post-high school education (college, vocational school, military training, etc.) contributed to their coming of age ,
create a list of questions that you want to ask them.

What strategies might you use to help your questioning flow like a narrative?
Homework:
Transforming the Liddell Transcript
p. 51
If you did not finish transforming the Liddell Transcript from pgs. 46-47, your homework assignment is to finish doing so.
Make sure to include and HIGHLIGHT examples of parallel structure, transition words and descriptive information. Ex: "He shrugged flippantly and shifted in his seat, ready to answer the next question".

Academic Vocabulary:
Analogy
Literal analogy vs. figurative analogy
Read Building an Argument 1.15,. 61. Answer #1.
Read information text p. 63 and answer #7-10




1. What is the voice of the interviewee in Excerpt 1?
2. What is the voice of the interviewee in Excerpt 2?
3. How is the pacing different for each?
4. Which one is more engaging? Why?
5. How does each approach capture the voice of the interviewee?
Transforming the Liddell Transcript
Using the interview transcript from pages 46-47, turn the transcript into an interview narrative.
1. Pick a point of view
2. Pick a narrative style- present tense or past tense
3. Include quotes from Liddell
4. Include 3 descriptive techniques and focus on a key incident.
5. Organize your narrative in a chronological and/or logical order.
6. Incorporate the quotes in different ways, don't always use "he said" or "Liddell said".

Journal Prompt:
What is the hardest part of writing a narrative that you've noticed so far? What is the easiest part?
SSR
Root word Quiz- 15 minutes- if you finish early, turn paper over, and read Picture Bride

SSR- 10
Transcript Transformer Format- this is the 2nd document you are typing . Your first is your open ended questions.
OPEN a NEW GOOGLE DOCS.

My Point of View Is (pick one- 1st person or 3rd person):
My Narrative Style Is (pick one- present or past tense):
My Focus Topic Is:
I am using _______________ Order (Chronological or Logical).
I am starting with this event:
My 3 Descriptive Techniques Are:
1. Technique 1: How he acts
2. Technique 2: How he speaks
3. Technique 3: How he looks
My 3 Quotes Are:
1. Quote 1
2. Quote 2
3. Quote 3
I am ending with this event:

Liddell Narrative
Once you have all of your pieces figured out, write your transcript in a paragraph format.
Make sure to begin with a topic sentence and end with a conclusion.
You may look at the interview narrative "WMDs" on pgs. 41-42 and Excerpts 1 & 2 for examples of how to organize your interview narrative.
Use the transcript from pgs. 46-47 as your information source for the content (what you are writing the narrative about).
Rhetorical Appeals
Ethos
- An appeal to character; establishing credibility as a trustworthy person.
Pathos
- An appeal to emotion; either positive or negative.
Logos
- An appeal to logic; using facts and statistics to back up your argument.
WHO WILL SAVE US?
Aliens have invaded.
Earth is under attack.
The armies of the world are no match!
WHO WILL SAVE US?

Your Task:
With your group, pick a superhero that you think would defend Earth the best.
Make a poster of your superhero and identify the Logos, Pathos, and Ethos for why they are best suited for this mission.
BATMAN
Logos-
Facts about Batman's career and skills at fighting monsters. "He has the tech to do the job."
Ethos-
Examples of Batman's good character. "He's the man for the job because he cares about Gotham AND the rest of the world."
Pathos-
Using emotion to get people to agree with you about Batman.
"He's the Dark Knight! Not even aliens scare him! He can take them all on!"
EXAMPLE POSTER
You will present your hero at the end of class.
We will then vote on who made the best case.
Day 13
Superhero Poster
Your group has 20 minutes to put your poster and argument together.
WHO WILL SAVE US?! ... You Decide
Superhero presentations and voting:
Each group presents their hero and tries to persuade the rest of the class to pick them.
As a class, we will vote on who is the best suited based on the group's argument.
Quote Workshop
Q&A in narrative form on pgs. 41-42, 50 and in magazines
1. Look at how the interviewer sets up the quotes.
How do they avoid asking questions before the quotes? What strategies do they use? Circle the sentences that introduce a question without asking it directly.
2. You may also look through the
provided magazines for integrated
quotes, then write down the quotes and context.
3. Under the quotes, explain how they embed the quote effectively without asking a question directly.
Entrance Ticket Prompt: How did you use the art of persuasion over the weekend? Tell me specifically how you used Logos, Pathos, and Ethos in your arguments. Did you convince your date to match your outfit? Or try to convince your parents to let all of your friends come over after the dance?
On a half-sheet of paper, answer the prompt. Turn them in to the first person in your row for me to collect when finished.
Rhetorical Appeals Recap: Logos= Logic and facts, Ethos= Ethics and good character, Pathos= Emotions

Day 14
Now that the World is Safe...
You are a reporter who has the opportunity to interview the hero who saved our planet!
Write an interview transcript between your reporter and the hero, discussing how they saved the world.
Come up with at least 5 questions for the hero to answer.
Provide a setting and set your transcript up similarly to the Chuck Liddell interview on pgs. 46-47 in your book. (Q & A format, not
narrative format.)
Voting for a Hero
Based off of who you think has the best credentials, vote on the hero you think should save the world.
An honest vote by show of hands decides the winner.
Homework
DUE WEDNESDAY~
Interview information: Name of person, time, location, and date of interview

DUE TUESDAY~
List of questions for your potential interviewee
Entrance Activity:
Quietly review the questions you wrote for your possible interviewee.
Revise them, think of better wordings and follow-up questions to ask. Write your revisions in a different colored pencil.
Questions to ask yourself as you review and to answer in your notes:
1. How do my questions address coming of age?
2. How thorough are my questions about my interviewee's experiences?
3. Do my questions give them the opportunity to give me a lot of information?
4. Do I have at least one question asking about a specific coming of age event?
Partner Interview Review
With your partner, trade questions. Star the questions that you think are their best, then write why you think so next to the question.
Find a question that you think could be better, then write a suggested revision next to it.
Predrafting
Look at the rubric on page 55 for your interview project. Circle, underline, or highlight the criteria you are unsure of how to achieve in your interview narrative.
On a separate sheet of paper, explain what aspects of the rubric and assignment you want more clarification on.
As a class we will discuss your questions.
Homework:
DUE WEDNESDAY~ Interview Information
THURSDAY~ Finalized Interview Questions
Interview Narrative Project Specifics
Your final narrative should be approximately 3-4 pages, typed, and free of major grammar and spelling errors. It will follow MLA formatting., but does not need a works cited page.
Your paper must include the rough drafts and revisions we will do.
It will be in narrative format and focus on your face-to-face interview with someone who meets the criteria defined in the directions. You MUST have your paper signed by the person you interviewed or it will not be grade.
Project Timeline:
Today - Interview completed, signed. Begin writing rough draft in class. Remember, this is NOT a LIST of questions, followed by the answer. Use the samples in your packet to decide HOW you want to set up your narrative. Must be double spaced, written in dark ink and you must incorporate the items within the packet such as the ones found in Part I and Part II. You should also look at the rubric in order to fully comprehend the requirements.
Exit Ticket:
In the remaining time in class, write an example of each:
1. Descriptive language (details, imagery)
2. 1st person perspective, 3rd person perspective
3. Effective transitions (look at your Transitions list for help)
4. Direct quotes and indirect quotes
5. Conveying voice (using the person's actions and descriptive information to show their personality)
Day 15
Homework Check:
Have your Interview Information ready; name of person, date of interview, time, and location of the interview all need to be present.
Clauses
Independent Clauses vs. Dependent Clauses
Independent clauses
can stand on their own as a sentence because they form a complete idea.
Dependent clauses
do not form a complete idea and cannot stand on their own.
Isn't Clause Santa's last name?
Yes, but in this context a clause is
a group of words with both a subject and a verb.
A Compound Sentence is...
Adverbials
Adverbials are dependent clauses that function as adverbs that add to the effect of the statement.
"Although the world is full of suffering,
it is also full of the overcoming of it." ~ Helen Keller
Adjectivals
A dependent clause that is used as an adjective in a sentence. It always modifies a noun and cannot be moved.
"The means by which we live have outdistanced the ends
for which we live.
" ~ Martin Luther King
Identifying Clauses- Page 60
Analogies
Exit Prompt:
Using clauses, imagery, and an example of a literal analogy and of a figurative analogy, explain this scene:
Then, come up with a vivid explanation of this scene, using the same elements as before:
Analogy
~ A comparison between two things for the purpose of drawing conclusions on one based on its similiarities to the other.
Figurative Analogy
- The two things being compared are generally unlike except for one shared characteristic.

Literal Analogy
- A comparison between two things that are similar in significant ways.
Complete the quote identifications on page 61 with an neighbor.
On your own, answer the questions on page 62
How can you use clauses and analogies in your interview narrative? What effect will it have?
Day 16
Adverbials vs. Adjectivals Round II:
https://campus.digication.com/English9/How_to_distinguish_between_Adjective_and_Adverb_Pr
Recapping Analogies
What quotes were literal analogies? What were figurative? What clues did you use to help you come to those conclusions?
The Art of Persuasion
"Education is not the filling of a bucket but the lighting of a fire."- William Butler Yeats
Figurative or Literal?

"The highest result of education is tolerance." -Helen Keller
Figurative or Literal?

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." -Nelson Mandela
Figurative or Literal?

"Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today." -Malcolm X
Figurative or Literal?

"Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the hert whose soil has never been loosened or fertilized by education; they grow there, firm as weeds among stones."- Charlotte Bronte
Figurative or Literal?
With a partner, pick one analogy that your both most agree with. On page 62, tell me why you chose that one. What did you like about your choice the most?

Talk with your partner about the types of analogies you see used in each quote. Are they good pieces of evidence to support claims about education?

Watch this video. As you do, write down the evidence the ad gives for each of the sections they talk about in the table on page 58. Then complete questions on p. 66.
Read, think, and annotate
Read the "New School Year, Old Story" article and examine the graph on page 63.
As you read, annotate the text and highlight the claims the article makes. Underline the evidence they use to support their claim.

Day 17
HW Check:
"New School Year, Same Story: Education Pays" annotated and highlighted, pg. 64 Questions answered
SSR- 10 min

Writing Prompt
pg. 64 Check for Understanding
Describe what makes a claim persuasive.
Choose a benefit from "5 Ways Ed Pays" table (pg. 58) that is NOT greater wealth and write a claim about that benefit.
Write this on a separate piece of paper and turn it in to the pink box when you finish.
The Rhetorical Triangle
Ethos: Speaker
Pathos: Audience
Logos: Text
Page 66- Identify which part of the Rhetorical Triangle the listed claims from "5 Ways Ed Pays" would fall under, then complete the remaining questions.
Read and annotate "America's Schoolchildren"
With a partner or a small group, identify the speaker, the evidence, and the audience, look for parallel structures and analogies and identify the evidence used to support the claim made.
With your partner, SOAPSTone and diagram the Rhetorical Triangle for the reading on a piece of construction paper. Put it on the Rhetorical Triangle Wall when you're finished.
Sender
Message
Effect
Logic
Language
On page 72, identify the aspects of SMELL for the reading. Be specific in your answers and use evidence and quotes from the reading to support your answers.
DRAW IT!
Using symbols, drawings, or cutouts from magazines, visually identify the Speaker, Text, and Audience relationship in the reading.
Friday Recap:
How is SMELL different from SOAPSTone? How are they similar? What would you use SMELL for that you might not use SOAPSTone for?
Answer on a half-sheet of paper in your journal format (Topic sentence, 2 transition words, 2 examples, conclusion) and turn in to the pink box when finished.
HW Check
SSR 10 minutes
Day 19
Entrance Prompt:
On a half-sheet of paper, tell me what the journal prompt format is and what six pieces it should contain. Use the format for this prompt and be specific.


Media Center
1. Type and print interview narrative draft
2. Print the following:
Interview Narrative Criteria Sheet
Journal Prompt Format Sheet
Transitions List
3. Turn in, renew, or pick out a new library book.
Group Presentation Days will be announced at a later date.
Day 20
Prompt:
Using the journal format, answer this question:
If everyone had mental telepathy, and others could read your mind, would your own thoughts change? If so, in what way?
(Format= 8-10 lines, at least 5 sentences. Topic sentence, 2 transition words, 2 examples, conclusion)
Media Center
Taking your marked-up copy from the peer review, make the changes on your paper and print off a final copy.
As you read your partner's narrative, do the following as you look at the criteria list:
Highlight examples of each of these elements:
Identify the thesis and conclusion
List the major points of support or evidence
Mark sentences or paragraphs that seem out of order, incompletely explained, or otherwise in need of revision with arrows to where you think they would fit better and an explanation why.
Imagery
Analogies (figurative or literal)
Transitions
Smoothly-incorporated quotes (Few or none of "I asked them this question...")
3 Direct quotes
3 Indirect quotes
Good spelling and grammar
Homework:
Complete your final copy
Have ready to turn in the following:
1. Written Interview Questions/Answers
2. Handwritten Narrative Rough Draft
3. Peer-reviewed typed rough draft
4. Clean final draft
Sandwich Comments
When you are finished reviewing, write 3 comments on the back of the draft:
1. One thing you thought they did very well in their narrative.
2. One thing you think they could fix in their narrative.
3. One thing you thought was interesting about their piece.
Day 20
Journal Prompt:
Following the journal format, answer this:
Which word in the dictionary should have your picture next to it as a perfect example? Why?

SSR 10 Minutes
SHOW ME THE EVIDENCE
Using the following texts, find examples of evidence that are used to support the 3 different rhetorical appeals.
"WMDs" by Brian O'Connor pgs. 41-42
"New School Year, Old Story: Education Pays" pg. 63
"Remarks by the President in a National Address to America's Schoolchildren" by Barack Obama pgs. 67-71
Quotes on pages 59-61
With your group, find an example for your type of support and explain what rhetorical appeal it is used with.

Group 1- Facts and Statistics

Group 2- Analogies

Group 3- Personal Experience/Ancedote

Group 4- Illustrative Example

Group 5- Expert/Personal Testimony

Whole Class- Hypothetical Case

Your answers should concisely answer the question; tell me how and why it supports the appeal and works as evidence.
Target Audiences- Activity 1.17 p. 73
Writing Prompt:
What is a target audience? How can you tell from a reading who the speaker is trying to talk to? Give examples.
In the texts cited from the activity, identify the target audiences.
1. "WMDs" Audience
2. "New School Year, Old Story: Education Pays" Audience
3. "Remarks by the President in a National Address to America's Schoolchildren" Audience
Read "An Early Start on College" on pgs. 75-76
Highlight the claim and the evidence the author uses to back themselves up.
On a separate sheet of paper, identify the following:
1. The target audience
2. The rhetorical appeals used and where you find them. (Logos, pathos, ethos)
3. Draw, label, and briefly explain the rhetorical triangle for this piece. (Speaker=Ethos, Logos=Evidence, Pathos=Audience)
Homework:
Complete questions 5 & 6 on pg. 76 for "An Early Start on College"
Day 21
Journal Prompt:
After five consecutive days of school, what do you look forward to most on the weekend? Why?

SSR 10 Minutes
What main 5 components of evidence would you use together to support an argument?
(Look at the table from pages 73-74)

The 6th Component... The Hypothetical Situation
How does it work as evidence if it technically isn't something that exists?
What rhetorical appeal would it most likely be?
In "An Early Start on College", name the primary audience. Who else are they addressing? What other audience might be interested?

With a partner, draw a portrait of each audience that the piece addresses. Find a quote that supports your portrait by directly referencing that audience.
Formal vs. Informal Writing
If writing styles were clothing, what would formal look like?
What would informal be?
What would be unique to each style?
Which one would be more appealing if you were trying to impress someone?

Design It!
A formal writing style is clear, concise, often based on facts and follows a plan.

It is versatile- it can be descriptive, critical, or analytical.
Choosing one of the three and keeping in mind the following components, design a type of formal wear (suit or dress) that represents a writing "occassion". Elements such as grammar and language can be shown as parts of the outfit where they would make the most sense.

Writing "Occassions" or "Events"
-Descriptive: Describes the facts of an event without an opinion.
Ex: The house caught on fire.
-Analytical: The facts of an event organized in a specific order. often includes a reason for that order.
Ex: The house caught on fire because someone left the stove on.
-Critical: The facts of an event in a certain order, with an opinion and a counter-point.
Ex: The house caught on fire because the homeowner is unorganized. Opponents say that the homeowner is not unorganized, they were just too busy to remember turning the stove on.

Choose a type of writing piece that best works with these styles (An art opening= descriptive, a war report= suit of armor)

Elements:

-Claims/Counterclaims (Attention-getting pieces of outfit)
-Flow of Content/Paragraph Format (Overall look)
-Types of Evidence (pgs. 73-74) (Accessories)


Claims and Evidence
Read through the two articles on 78-79 and highlight the claim each one makes.
On the graph on page 81, work with a partner to identify the claims and evidence for each piece. Then, identify the counterclaims found in each article.
The chart should have 4-5 textual evidence quotes in each box.

Answer questions 4-6 in your book, p. 82
For question 7, identify the call to action for both .
Day 22

Pick up major Works Analysis Sheet and the novel, The House on Mango Street from the bookshelf. Test and submission of Major Works sheet: Monday, Oct 19

Journal: 8 minutes- follow template, use transitions and highlight.
Do you like to make difficult decisions by yourself, or have someone else make them for (with) you? Why?

The Thesis Sentence: An Introduction
Whenever you write a paper, you need to clearly tell your reader what you will be talking about. The topic sentence, or thesis, is in the road map for the reader. It tells them the big idea that you will talk about in the rest of your paper and usually previews the smaller parts of that big idea. A thesis is an opinion- not a fact, and your job through the rest of the paper is to back that opinion up and convince your readers that you are right.
Which one is a thesis statement?
"The Red-Headed League" is a short story.
"The Red-Headed League" is a good short story.
The Thesis/Paper Relationship Formula
The number of paragraphs in the body are determined by the number of components in the thesis.
Every Blank = An Essay Component = A Body Paragraph
Ex: "The Red-Headed League" is a
good
story because of the
suspenseful plot
and
fascinating characters
.
Thesis Practice
Rewrite these sentences and fill in the blanks on a sheet of paper:
1. I can best be described as ______________ and ______________.
2. Although I see myself as ______________, other people may see me as _________________.
3. Simple objects, such as ____________ and ____________, serve as symbols for the most important _____________ in my life.
4. I used to be ____________; now I am______________; someday I hope to be ___________.
5. My three most important goals are to _________________, to _________________, and to __________________.
Find the Components (Whiteboard)
Argument in Action

Using the thesis components structure, develop a topic sentence for the prompt:
How valuable is a college education? Take a stand on the issue. Using 2-3 support components, make a claim about whether or not a college education is as valuable as people say it is.

Your thesis should state your opinion (for or against the value of college) and give at least three strong reasons why.

Day 23
Journal:
Who is the person who has the most faith and confidence in your abilities? How do they show it?

SSR & HW Check
Underline and number the amount of components in the thesis sentence.
The Essay Planning Page
Pick one of the five topics that you came up with yesterday and use that thesis to craft an essay on the planning page. Each component of the thesis has a body paragraph about it.
Crafting a Strong Thesis
A good thesis sentence tells the reader exactly what you are going to talk about in your paper. It clearly states the subject of your paper, your opinion, and gives two or more components that you will discuss in detail. A bad thesis statement is vague and doesn't have a strong opinion or support for the topic.

Which one is a strong thesis? Why?

The North and South fought the Civil War for many reasons, some of which were the same and some different.

While both Northerners and Southerners believed they fought against tyranny and oppression, Northerners focused on the oppression of slaves while Southerners defended their own right to self-government.

In a paragraph, explain which thesis does a better job explaining the author's opinion and support. What specifics of the paper do they mention?
Look at the thesis you wrote for homework- how can you specify your opinion and components?
Rewrite your thesis to be more specific and detailed.
1. I can best be described as ______________ and ______________.
2. Although I see myself as ______________, other people may see me as _________________.
3. Simple objects, such as ____________ and ____________, serve as symbols for the most important _____________ in my life.
4. I used to be ____________; now I am______________; someday I hope to be ___________.
5. My three most important goals are to _________________, to _________________, and to __________________.
Body Paragraphs and Details
Each paragraph takes a component from your thesis and talks about it for at least 5 sentences. For each component, you want to have three details/examples that explain and illustrate that point.
This format is very similar to your journal prompt format- you give a topic sentence, examples, and transitions that move from one paragraph to the next.

Transitions- Look at pg. 78; how does each body paragraph start? How do they transition from one idea to the next?
HW:
Using the thesis you developed about the value of college, follow the Essay Planning Outline and outline your argument for or against the value of college.
Day 24
Journal:
On a scale from 1-10, how likely are you to take chances?
SSR & HW Check
Body Paragraphs
Using the essay outline sheet prompt from yesterday, pick one of your body paragraphs.
What three details did you use?
Are they strong examples for that component?
In the margins of your paper or on the back, explain why you think the details you chose are strong supports.
For each example, find a way to portray it that connects to the reader and relates to the topic sentence.
1. Personal experience
2. Well-known reference or expert testimony
3. Common knowledge/common situation
HW:
Expand your 2 or 3 body paragraphs for your college essay. What examples can you use to make your supporting details more interesting?
Include the following types of examples for each body paragraph:
1. Personal experience
2. Well-known reference or expert testimony
3. Common knowledge/common situation
Use at least 3 Types of Evidence from our list in your examples, one per supporting detail. Make sure to include strong transition words.
Types of Evidence
1. Facts and Statistics (Logos) -Red
2. Analogy (Logos/Ethos) -Orange
3. Personal Experience (Pathos/Ethos) -Yellow
4. Illustrative Example (Logos/Pathos) -Green
5. Expert/personal testimony (Ethos/Logos) -Blue
6. Hypothetical Situation (Logos) -Purple
What makes this a good body paragraph? pg. 80
"Anti-college sentiment is nothing new. Mark Twain admonished us not to let schooling interfere with education, and we've always celebrated the maverick who blazes their own path. These days it's Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, Microsoft's Bill Gates, or Apple's Steve Jobs- all college dropouts- who are held up as evidence of why all that time sitting in class is better spent elsewere. Perhaps, but it's also worth remembering that their companies are bursting with college graduates. And what about all the people who didn't finish college and are not at the helm of a wildly successful venture?"
In your book, annotate what examples they use to make this paragraph interesting and persuasive.
What types of evidence do they use?
Using colored pencils, highlight each type of evidence you find in the paragraph on pg. 80.
On your Essay Planning Sheet, name a type of evidence that would work best with each of your three details.
On a separate piece of paper, write that body paragraph and include those examples. Your paragraph should be at least 5 sentences and include both examples and transition words. Be descriptive!
When you are finished, underline your examples in their coordinating color for easy identification. Turn it in to the pink box.
If you finish early, you may start on your "Value of College" homework.
Begin writing your body paragraphs- use the types of evidence, transition words, and descriptive examples.

Day 25
Journal:
What is your formula for being successful as an adult? Why?
SSR & HW Check
What's your Evidence?
You wrote 2 paragraphs about the value of college.
Highlight/underline your three types of evidence that you used per paragraph. Number each and in the margins of your paper or on the back, explain what types of evidence you used and what you think it adds to your argument.
Does it specify?
Does it elaborate?
Does it make your reader think?
Why or why not?
Swap paragraphs with a partner.
Read their paragraphs and answer these questions on the back of their paper.
1. Is the topic sentence clearly stated? How?
2. Do their supporting details clarify the topic? How?
3. Do their forms of evidence make sense with the topic? How?
4. Do they make you think? Why?
5. Is their evidence engaging? Why?
6. Do they include any transitions? Where, how well?
7. Do they use personal examples, common knowledge, and expert testimonies at all? What is the effect of their use?
Paragraph Share
A Good Introduction...
... A Good Conclusion
Starts with a hook and ends with a THESIS STATEMENT.
Recaps the thesis and supports and ends on a thought for the reader to consider.
Write an introduction for your Essay Plan Page topic. It shouldbe about 3 sentences long.
Write a conclusion
HW:
Write an introduction for your college piece. What can you say that will grab your readers' attention?

Connect your paragraphs with transitions, either words or phrases. Make the paper flow!

Write a conclusion. What can you say that sums up your paper and asks the reader to think about your point?
Computer Lab Day
Transfer your written pieces from your argument essay to a word document. Edit, revise, and pull it together.
Print it off for use in class on Monday
Write a conclusion for your Essay Planning Page topic. Make sure to restate your thesis and briefly review your supports before ending on a thought that engages the reader's mind.
Transitions
These are words and phrases that connect paragraphs. Look at your paragraphs about college; where and how can you include transition words and phrases?
Day 26
Friday Preview:
Computer Lab Day to pull together your Value of College essay. You will have the hour to write and revise your essay, to research your root words, and to work on your sets.
Instructions for both the Root Word presentations and your Value of College essay will be on Skyward. Print them off in class tomorrow.
Journal:
Is an incredibly strong desire all you need to achieve what you want? Why, or why not?

SSR & HW Check (Introduction and Conclusion paragraphs)
Print List
1. Value of College Essay Instructions
2. Transitions List
3. Root Sets Instructions

Counterclaims
What argument is opposite of yours? How would you address it, then refute it?

Look at pgs. 78-80 for examples of counterclaims.
Where would you put your counterclaim in your college essay? At the beginning? At the end? Where does it fit best?
When you are done with your paper...
1. Get in your Root Set Groups.
2.Read the Root Word Presentation Instructions
3. Divide up the words per person- who gets what?
Circle the roots YOU are responsible for
4. Decide on a presentation style (Prezi? Powerpoint? Posterboard? Skit with pictures? You choose!)
5. Divide up responsibilities- who is doing what?
Next Week Due Dates
Wednesday, Oct. 22 - Root Group 1 Presents
Friday, Oct. 24- Journals Due

Day 27
Journal:
What is your favorite time of day? Why?
SSR
Argument Paper Overview
Paper Prompt and Guidelines are on Skyward under "Argumentative Paper Guidelines" in your message center
Essay Review
Counterclaims
On a separate sheet of paper, write down your main claim.
Once you've identified your main argument, think of a good counterargument someone might make and write that down.

Example:
Claim-
"College is valuable because it prepares you for a rewarding career by teaching you time management and financial management."

Counterclaim-
"You can learn financial management and time management without going to college; there are many good careers that do not require a college degree."
Once you find a counterclaim, you need to refute it.
Refute
- To prove that a statement, theory, or person is wrong.
Read your essay to yourself. As you do, complete the following:
1. With a yellow highlighter, mark your thesis statement and restated thesis in your conclusion.
2. With a green highlighter, mark your hook.
3. Underlining in blue pencil or pen, find your three supporting details.
4. In red pen or pencil, number each of your evidences and write their names in that numbered order in the margin of your paper.
5. Circle your transition words and any word-links or idea-links that you used between paragraphs.
On the back of your paper, answer the questions in full sentences:
1.Is my thesis clear and easy to understand?
2. Is my hook engaging and do I transition well to my thesis?
3. Do I have three details for each of my supports?
4. What types of evidence do I use? Do they make sense?
5. Does my conclusion restate my thesis? Is it engaging?
Read "Why College Isn't for Everyone" and circle the counterclaim. When you are done, read "Actually, College is Very Much Worth It" and answer them for that piece.
Answer the questions on lined paper:
1. Where did the writer place the counterclaim? Does it work well there? Why?
2. Do you think they could have put the counterclaim somewhere else in the article and it would have worked well? Where would they put it?
3. What evidence do they use to back up the counterclaim?
4. What evidence do they use to refute the counterclaim?
Compare your answers for each piece.
1. How are the two articles' counterclaims addressed?
2. What evidence do they use to support that counterclaim? How much?
3. What evidence do they use to refute that claim? Does it work? How?
HW:
On your essay draft, circle an area where you think your counterclaim would fit best. In the margins, explain why it fits there the best. Write a paragraph addressing your counterclaim either on the back of your essay with an arrow pointing to where it would go or on a separate sheet of paper.
The counterclaim paragraph follows the same format at the others. Topic sentence, 3 supporting pieces of evidence, and transitions.
Day 28
Journal:
Where would you say is the most relaxing spot on earth? Why?
SSR
Root Presentations Q&A
Review Counterclaim
1. Where does it fit the best?
2. What evidence did you use to support it?
3. How did you refute it?
4. What transitions will you use to incorporate it into your essay?
Incorporating Quotes
"Text Talker" quote incorporations
Direct quotes from sources follow this format:
"This is a really important and poignant quote" (Francisco 2014).

Indirect quotes or paraphrases follow this format:
Ms. Francisco spoke of a very poignant and important topic in her discussion about quoting (Francisco 2014).
Purdue OWL Website:
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/03/
Dates, Page Numbers, and Names
At the end of each quotation is something that looks like this:
(Francisco 2014)
(Francisco 78)
If you were quoting an article I wrote and knew my (the author's) last name and the date of the publication, you would write that in the citation.

If you know the name of the author and the article has several pages to it, you would name the author and give the page number you found the quote on so your reader can find that reference.
Citations are proof to the reader that you didn't come up with random stuff to support your point.
They prove your reliability and support your evidence.
Read through your list of resource articles; which ones support your argument paper the best? Pick one or two articles from the reading list that fit best with your piece.
Reading List for Evidence Supports
1. “New School Year, Old Story: Education Pays” from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics pg. 63
2. “Remarks by the President in a National Address to America’s Schoolchildren” by President Barack Obama pgs. 67-71
3. “An Early Start on College” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune pgs. 75-76
4. “Why College Isn’t for Everyone” by Richard Vedder pg. 78-79
5. “Actually, College is Very Much Worth It” by Andrew J. Rotherham pg. 79-80

1. Pick 5 quotes from your two articles.
2. Use the Text Talker "frames" to frame your chosen quote.
3. Cite the quote using the author's name and the page number in the (Name Number) format.

HW:
Using the quotes you collected in class or finding new ones, incorporate them into your essay.
Where will they fit best? Write them in between the lines or add arrows to show where you want them.
Citing Sources Resources and Format
MLA
Son of a Citation Machine & Easybib
Practice MLA Citation Format
Day 29
Journal:
What would have to happen for you to be completely happy? Why?
SSR
Root Group 1 Presentation
As Group 1 is presenting, get out your Root Set packets and fill in the derivatives for each root they present.
Computer Lab
1. Print the Argument Essay Guidelines
2. List your references- Make a Works Cited in Microsoft Word (at the end of your paper) or insert it from Son of a Citation or Easybib.com
3. ROOT WORD GROUP 1- Individually print off a copy of the Root Word Assignment sheet, put your name on it and then self-grade the work you did, out of 20 total points.
List the jobs you did for the presentation, tell me why you deserve the grade you gave yourself.
Grade your group members in accordance to how they did.
When you are finished, fold and staple your grading sheets and hand them to me.
HW:
Finish and save your typed essay. Make sure you have a works cited page.
Read through the list of criteria, edit your work and make sure everything is included.
Day 30
Journal:
Is it possible to be too nice?
If so, is that a bad thing?
Surprise!
Media Center Time
1. Finish writing your essay and works cited page; edit with a partner.
More time = higher standards!
Do you have an engaging introduction? Are your quotes well integrated and backed up with solid reasoning?
2. Meet with your Root Word group and plan out your presentation. Get it started now so you don't have to rush.
Journals due
Friday, Oct. 24
Argumentative Paper due
Monday, Oct. 27
Syllabus and Procedures Overview and Annotation
1. Take out both packets- syllabus and "Can I Chew Gum in Class" questions.
2. Get a highlighter. (Today you may borrow; need to have your own by next Monday.)
3. With a partner, annotate and highlight the syllabus while you answer the questions in your packet.
You must use full sentences and answer each question to get full points. Draw inferences to find answers. Not every question has an obvious, literal answer.
HOMEWORK for TUESDAY:

Complete "Can I Chew Gum in class" for tomorrow.
Tomorrow is PICTURE DAY. Called down by LAST NAME
Quiz over 8th grade literary terms
Read the MATERIALS NEEDED section in your syllabus and have those by Monday. We will organize our binders together then.
Test on Speak is Friday
Day One- Welcome to English 9 Honors
"The smarter you are, the more you have to learn."
Come in, fill in the front desks first & find your seat.
If you have a cell phone, take it out and place it on your desk.
On your desk, please place the following: Summer journal(name on inside or front cover in dark ink) and SPEAK novel(name on inside/front cover in dark ink)
PROCEDURES: My hand raised, you end your conversation and your hand goes up to acknowledge that you are ready to listen to the next set of instructions.

Pick up the following on the resource table near the door
1. Course Syllabus, Honors 9 English Vocabulary Lists, cell phone half sheet, Honor code sheet, Rubric for Summer Journal, & "Can I Chew Gum in Class?"
2. "Speak" Journal Turn In - Include your rubric inside of your journal.
Journals go in the
PINK
basket labeled with your hour.
The novel itself must have your name inside it, and be placed facing forward on its bottom in the box labeled with your hour.
3. Pick up Springboard workbook and put YOUR NAME in PEN/SHARPIE in the front inside cover. These come to class every day.


Of COURSE you need your Springboard book:))
Cell phone off. Look at sheet to find your number(above the cell phone holder and place in the slot
Pick up 9H Paragraph Journal Writing sheets, and the Major Works Data Sheet from table.
Pick up your corrected journal, SPEAK book.
Submit "Can I Chew Gum" Packet, honor code and cell phone form into pink basket AFTER everyone has taken our their journals.
Vocab quiz Friday, and next Tuesday, all matching.
SPEAK Test on Monday. We will review on Friday
SSR Sustained Silent Reading and Picture Bride
Intro to Springboard and Unit 1, if time
Cell phone partners , and Unpacking the Unit if time





SSR(Sustained Silent Reading) - Normally 10 minutes- Bamboo Grove/Picture Bride/SPEAK.
5th HOUR Get novel SPEAK
Pick up packet from the Table.
Journal - Follow template- Choice of : (A) What does Melinda's room say about her? or (B) How does your room express who you are?-8 min

Today, we are reading the entire hour to get a jump start into your Picture Bride book. You can work within your MWDSheet as well.

TOMORROW: Vocabulary Quiz
Monday- Novel on Speak test; We will review for test tomorrow.




SSR- 10 minutes
Journal- #3- Why do we sometimes not like people who are really good at things, like sports, music, art, or school? Is that fair? Are adults like this? 8 minutes

Vocabulary quiz
Review for Monday's test on Speak.Bring own paper
7 vocabulary matching
5 character quote matching
5 multiple choice- basic plot events
1 essay-choose from 1 of two topics. Complete essay with introduction, body paragraphs including examples, quotes, transitions, and conclusion.

SPRINGBOARD BOOK:
PICK UP NAMETAGS
1. Get one "Unpacking the Unit" sheet from the table.
2. With a partner, scan through Unit 1
3. Write in your findings in the corresponding box.
4. Look at the Embedded Assessments in the unit. What are they?
Key
Key Texts: The stories and writings you will pay the most attention to in the unit.
Writing Modes: What type of writing the unit will have you practice. (Letters, narratives, essays, etc.)
"Wow!" : Something positive you are looking forward to in the unit.
"Whoa!": Something you are unsure about or worried about in the unit.
Read Speak- Writing Assignment #1

TOMORROW: Vocabulary Quiz
Monday- Novel on Speak test; We will review for test tomorrow.
Test Friday over the summer reading. You MAY use your novel, however, the test will be timed.
#1-7= Quotes from novel with word bank- Vocabulary
#8-12- Character and quote matching
#13-17- Multiple choice
Essay(s)- Use your own paper.

Yesterday, we were reminded of the definition of INFERENCE, an academic vocabulary term.
In your journal, respond to the following quote from Speak, and how it is an example of INFERENCE. “Where to sit? If I sit in the middle, a stranger could sit next to me” (pg. 3).
Remember, each journal must contain a thesis statement, 2 sentences of support, 3 transition words and a conclusion. Your transition word must be used correctly and
HIGHLIGHTED
.


Journal-
Throughout her first few days of school, Melinda comments on the structure of her family. Do you believe that Melinda’s relationship with her parents may be part of the reason why she is experiencing difficulty at school? Why or why not? Please provide any relevant experiences in your response. - Must include topic sentence, 1-2 supporting sentences,examples and 2 transitions. 5 minutes
SSR- 15 minutes
Card sort: Alliteration, Metaphor, Simile and Personification.
With your partner, sort the words and sentences that correspond.
When you feel like your sort is correct, take a picture of it and send it to me at tourdam@bcschools.net with "5th hour card sort" in the subject line and include the group members names along with the picture.
Time: 10 minutes
Journal- 5 minutes
SSR- 10 minutes
TEST: YOU WILL WRITE ALL OF YOUR ANSWER ON YOUR OWN PAPER. Take out 3-5 pages so you do not disturb others.
Number your paper 1-17.

You MAY use your novel, however, the test will be timed. 2:28 is the end time.
#1-7= Quotes from novel with word bank- Vocabulary- Indicate the correct letter
#8-12- Character and quote matching- Indicate the correct letter
#13-17- Multiple choice- Indicate the correct letter

Essays can be started anywhere on paper. Must include- introduction, numerous(2-3 body paragraphs, ) transition words, examples from novel to PROVE YOU READ IT, conclusion.

If you finish early, turn your paper over and read quietly. NO ELECTRONICS, NO TALKING.
Do NOT get up and submit your paper.




Journal:
8 minutes
How would
Speak
be changed if it was written in a different point of view? Perhaps a different character wrote the story instead of Melinda. Use the transitions template and transitions list. Use Journal template given

Cell Phone Partner from yesterday

Learning How To Interview p. 25-29.
DO Chart and #6-9.
Card sort of literary terms.

HOMEWORK:
Read 1.8 Always Running p. 32 and DO #1-2 plus Key Ideas and Details
Read 1.8 Race Politics p. 35, #3-4. Key ideas and details






p. 25 Interviewing - Cell phone partner #5.
#1-8. Typed and due at end of class Wednesday. You must insert a table for #5.

SOAPSTone p. 43 for WMD
Subject
Occasion (situation)
Audience
Purpose
S3 Subject, Style, Syntax
Tone

In the media center, your paper needs to meet the requirements listed.
MLA format, 3-4 pages in length and all of the items from Parts I & II.
Tomorrow: Meet in Media Center; paper due at the end of the class tomorrow with the first page and rubric from the packet stapled to the BACK of the paper.

Suggestion:
Print your paper out and go through it by highlighting or circling all of the items that you must have in it. Use Parts I and II as a guide.



HOMEWORK:
Read and annotate America's School Children, p. 67; Complete #6., and the SMELL strategy chart on p. 72. Do 1.17 and use Liddell, Education, Schoolchildren, or any quotes/journals.

Read and annotate An Early Start on College, p. 75;
Read and Annotate Why College isn't for Everyone
Read and Annotate Actually, College is Very Much Worth It
Highlight Claim, COunterclaim; formal and informal language
As you annotate, you are highlighting any of the three rhetorical appeals, parallel structure and anaphora.
Standard: L.9-10.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to a comprehension or expression.
Pick up both TRANSITION sheets from the table; SSR- 10 min.

Introduction to TRANSITIONS-
Practice transitions activity
(DO NOT DO JOURNAL UNTIL INSTRUCTED:)
Read the interaction between Ms. Connors and Melinda. How does the way the author writes Ms. Connors’ dialogue affect the feeling of the moment? How does her choice of punctuation change the way you read and feel about the scene?

"Ms. Connors: "Try an outside shot bank it off the board have you thought about a tutor nice shot it's those Ds that are killing you try a lay-up that needs work I could maybe do something about the social studies grade but your English teacher is impossible she hates sports do you have a hook shot?"

I just do what I'm told. If I felt like talking, I would explain that she couldn't pay me enough to play on her basketball team."





Introduction to Springboard - How book is setup
WITHIN EACH UNIT
Academic Vocabulary
Literary Terms
Word Connections
Grammar Usage
Key Ideas & Details
My Notes
SPRINGBOARD BOOK IS NEEDED EVERY DAY !
SPEAK BOOK IS NEEDED EVERY DAY
HIGHLIGHTER IS NEEDED !
Pick up corrected papers in basket, 3 hole punch, save all & file
Read 20 minutes- read as far as you can.
Unit 1: Coming of Age
Talking about Voice- Activity 1.2, p. 5-7
ALWAYS: Preview all Literary terms, academic vocabulary as a prereading strategy. BOLD words are important and provide guidance and emphasis.
VOICE = The "fingerprint" of the author. It is the result of the speaker's use of language. It includes DICTION, SYNTAX and IMAGERY.
With your partner, review 1. 2,3,4 and the chart on page 6.
Then complete Speaker 2, 3 & 4 on page 7.




RISE AND READ: Standard (Reading for Information) RI9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RISE AND READ:
Standard (Literacy)L.9-10.5b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
Standard L. 9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
VOICE consists of Diction, Syntax and Imagery
Day One- Welcome to English 9 Honors
Find a seat of your choice
"The smarter you are, the more you have to learn."
Introduction to Springboard - How book is setup
WITHIN EACH UNIT
Academic Vocabulary
Literary Terms
Academic Vocabulary
Word Connections
Grammar Usage
Key Ideas & Details
My Notes
Day 2
Roots & Vocabulary
Day 3
Day 5



RISE AND READ:
RL9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, intereact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.


Day 6
RL9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, intereact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

STANDARD:
L.9-10.10 Use Parallel Structure
L. 9-10.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
RISE and READ: Determine the meaning of words as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings as well as choices on meaning and tone.
SSR- 10
Journal Prompt: You can address any one of these or any combination in your response.
How is the speaker’s (Melinda’s) voice different from the author’s (Laurie Halse Anderson’s) voice in the story? What does Melinda say about life and school that is different from what the author says? What are some examples of the author’s message being different from what Melinda believes/experiences?
Vocab Quiz #2

CCSS:
RL.9-10.5Analyze how the author's choices concerning how to structure a text, or events within it, and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension and surprise.
RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
RL9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
Homework:
DO Before Reading #1-4, p. 14.
Highlight Marigolds (pp. 15-22).
Find examples of diction, syntax, imagery, parallelism, and tone. Mark each with a different color.
Diction= Red Syntax= Orange
Imagery= Green Parallelism= Purple
Tone= Yellow
What inferences can you make about the speaker and the events?

NEED SPEAK AND SPRINGBOARD AND HIGHLIGHTER AND GROUPS
As you listen to the rest of the Marigolds story, continue to highlight the items you started yesterday.


5th hour Thursday:
Pick up your Assignment #2- Blue Roses from the basket from yesterday.
Work to finish that today and submit in basket.
Read and finish Second marking Period in SPEAK book.
Begin and continue reading third marking period.
1:45- Begin writing Part 2 SPEAK assignments.

FRIDAY:
Pick up all corrected assignments from the basket and KEEP THEM.
In computer lab, type your SPEAK Part 2 Writing assignments in a NEW DOCUMENT LABELED SPEAK PART 2. Label each item A, B, C.
Limit the number of _TH words that start a sentence.
Provide quotes, examples for support.



CCSS:
W(Writing).9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W.9-10.5- Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Submit index card of your Interview subjects in the basket. Make sure YOUR NAME is on the card as well. We will be moving forward quickly this week with that interview so I certainly hope you have contacted that person and gotten permission already.
SSR- 10 minutes



Journal Prompt: 8 minutes
Read the interaction between Ms. Connors and Melinda. How does the way the author writes Ms. Connors’ dialogue affect the feeling of the moment? How does her choice of punctuation change the way you read and feel about the scene?

"Ms. Connors: "Try an outside shot bank it off the board have you thought about a tutor nice shot it's those Ds that are killing you try a lay-up that needs work I could maybe do something about the social studies grade but your English teacher is impossible she hates sports do you have a hook shot?"

I just do what I'm told. If I felt like talking, I would explain that she couldn't pay me enough to play on her basketball team."
Pg. 75


Direct vs. Indirect Quotation- What's the difference?
Write down partner's first and last name.
On your own, write down four IMPORTANT questions about your partner(from your group) (What questions give you the most information?)
Springboard Activity 1.6, p. 25, #1-4
Learning How to Interview
Complete #5-9 with your partner.
Revise your partner questions to make sure they're open-ended.
#10 Introducing your Partner will be completed on your own paper and must follow the bulleted guidelines on p. 28.
For tomorrow: Have a rough draft written on your own paper to introduce your partner. This is in paragraph form, not Q & A form.

Embedded Assessment 1, p. 55

CCSS
RL9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.
RL9-10.5 Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events and manipulate time create effects such as mystery, tension, or surprise.
Day 8
Reading an Interview Narrative p. 40 Activity 1.9, p. 39
RI.9-10.6 Determine an author's point or view, or purpose and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
RI9-10.5 Analyze in detail how an athor's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of the text.
RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis orseries of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
RISE AND READ: L.9-10.1b: Use varios types of phrases and clauses to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.
RISE and READ RI.9-10.2- Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development.
RI9-10.8- Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient.
RISE and READ:
RI.9-10.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance
Retrieve corrected papers/Quizzes from basket. I will give instructions when we organize binders.
SSR- 10 minutes
Journal: #4
• If you were one of Melinda’s friends, what would your reaction to her “party pooping” ways be? What would you do if one of your friends did something similar? Use your journal template. 8 minutes
Vocabulary Quiz #1. YOu will have VOCAB quiz # 2 on Friday as we messed up the dates.

Binder organization. In the following order, label the 6 sections as follows:
1. Syllabus & Journals- Transition words, Journal paragraph template
2. Roots- You will need loose leaf notebook paper in here. Powerpoint is given every other Monday; test over those 10 is the following Thursday.
3. Vocabulary
4. Unit 1- Coming of Age (Includes SPEAK) Major Works Data SHeet
5. Unit 2- Defining Style
6. Unit 3- Coming of Age in Changing Times
You need a PAPER/HARD COPY calendar!!!!
Trimester 1 school calendar- important dates.

KEEP YOUR BINDER and YOUR SPRINGBOARD book for 2nd TRIMESTER or 3rd, because you do not get a 2nd book, and we will continue to build your binder together. You will need the remaining tabs for Tri 2.
*As you are given new items, please 3 hole punch EVERYTHING and place in your binder in the appropriate category.

Journal: Use your summer journal. Date at the top of each entry. Response should be a minimum of 8 lines. 10 minutes
Throughout her first few days of school, Melinda comments on the structure of her family. Do you believe that Melinda’s relationship with her parents may be part of the reason why she is experiencing difficulty at school? Why or why not? Please provide any relevant experiences in your response.

SSR- 10 minutes
With cell phone partner #8, review all of the the highlighted Academic Vocabulary and literary terms you have encountered thus far.
Parallelism Identification: 1.4, p. 12,
Together, Highlight the examples of parallelism in each quote, then write out the pattern that the speaker used under the quote. Complete #1-5 plus Check for Understanding. All work can and should be done in your book.

SPEAK TEST TOMORROW- You will use your own paper and can use your notes and the novel.

Bring extra work to do- other homework, etc. No one can go to their locker.



SSR-10 min;
Journal prompt- 1st hour: Ko said that Hideyo purposely failed the written test to join the armed forces.
Do you think she was right? Why or why not?
4th hour: Describe the relationship that develops between Hana and Kiyoshi Yamaka. What mixed
feelings does Hana have about the relationship?
Root word list 3-4
Finish group chart from Friday.
Liddell p. 45, 1.10 #1, 2, 3 During Reading, Key Ideas & Details
Read Chuck Liddell transcript p. 46
DO After reading P. 4,5 and complete chart
Transforming the Transcript 1.11 - Excerpt and Writing Prompt(on own paper)
Homework:
Finish 1.11 Writing Prompt
Vocab quiz tomorrow
Journals due Friday- make sure all transition words are highlighted.

Vocabulary quiz #4
Work in Chromebooks on writing assignment
You should have completed your interview and are now
starting to type it into an interview narrative. The rubric is on page 55.
You will submit your original questions as well as your final draft.
Picture Bride test is Friday
Turn in your notebook to the second page of your syllabus.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/15/

Today, make sure you are working on the following:
1. Transition words- use them correctly
2. Imagery- describe in detail the person, setting, etc.
3. Diction choices- elevate your vocabulary
4. What point of view are you writing this from? 1st person, 3rd? Either is fine, just be consistent.
5. Vary sentence starters.
6. MLA Format- 2nd page of syllabus- this is considered a formal paper and should be treated as such. No contractions unless in a direct quote.
7. Appropriate title
Use own paper;
You may write on the back. Pick 2 essays.
You may use book and major works sheet
When finished, you may read or do other homework.
1:25 collect tests, submit Major Works Analysis Sheet, and novel.
Class ends at 1:35

SSR- 10 minutes

Do Check for Understanding p. 24
KEY VOCABULARY: Denotation, connotaion, foreshadowing, parallel structure,diction, inference, imagery, juxtaposition

Interview Narrative p. 24- Open ended vs. closed ended questions.
KEY VOCABULARY: direct vs. indirect quotations,

SPEAK TEST:
Spread out- try not to sit next to anyone.
Use your own paper. When finished, turn papers over and read silently or do other homework.
At 2:20 I will give the final instructions.
CCSS: Determine the meaning of words as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings as well as choices on meaning and tone.
SSR- 10 minutes
Root Test- 10 minutes, turn over when done. Sit quietly or read novel.
Test next Friday on novel. Consists of 8 multiple choice; two essays(there are four to choose from.)
Classwork:
Group Introductions:
Using the information about your partner from your questions, introduce them to another pair . Each person introduces their partner until everyone has been introduced.
Read 1.8 Always Running p. 32, annotate and DO #1-2 plus Key Ideas and Details
Read 1.8 Race Politics, annotate p. 35, #3-4. Key ideas and details.

HOMEWORK for Friday:
Read
EA1: p. 54. 1.12. Planning an Interview.



SSR- 10 minutes
Journal- 10 minutes. Be sure to use the Paragraph writing template & the transitions. Highlight your transitions in each journal. Notice what terms Melinda uses to describe other people. Why does she refer to some only by nicknames while others have their names used? What do you think this means?
SSR- 10 minutes
TOMORROW: Bring own paper, pen or pencil. You MAY USE book, notes, etc. on test. Bring/get new novel, The House on Mango Street. Read when finished.
TODAY: Literary Terms, Academic Vocabulary, and Root Group.
Page 4
On pink paper, each term needs to be addressed in the following manner:
Word in LARGE DARK easy-to-read format
A visual representation of the word
A definition of the word.
Groups:
1: Reese, madison, Marielena, Shayla,
2: Alissa, Eliana, Morgan, Beau,
3. Josie, Kelsey, Brian,Kendra
Get out you own paper, pen or pencil.
You MAY USE book, notes, etc. on test.
When finished, turn over test and answers and either read or do other work. At 2:20 I will give further directions.
Bring/get new novel, The House on Mango Street.
Read when finished. Test for Mango is Jan 15.
Pick up the Embedded assessment rubric on the table.
SSR- 20
House on Mango test is next Friday. Discuss test structure

DO NOT HAND IN PAPER YET- we are completing an activity with them today in class.

STAPLE your paper and drafts n the following order:
ON TOP: FINAL DRAFT
2nd: 2nd rough draft
3rd: 1st draft
bottom: RUBRIC

SSR- 20; helping you to finish the book. The BEST gift I can give is the gift of time. Use it well.

You will need 11 sticky notes.

You will be evaluating each persons paper based on the rubric. You are to make comments USING THE RUBRIC wording to justify a score.

You MAY WRITE on their paper as well.
SSR- 10 minutes
Finish Firework

Journal Entry 1- Date

Pick a favorite character from the novel Speak. Justify your reasons for your pick. Use the Journals Paragraph Writing template as a guide and transitions. You have 8 minutes to complete the task.



Exchange journal entries.
Highlight the transitions that your partner used in their journal.
Make sure your partner has all of the requirements for the journal.

Take out Major Works Data Sheet. Pick up your novel, Picture Bride.

SPEAK TEST
You will need:
A few sheets of your own paper
Dark colored ink pen or lead pencil
SPEAK novel.
When finished, QUIETLY turn test and answers over and place under your desk. You may read your novel (Grove/Bride) and work on MWDSheet.
Tomorrow we will organize binders.
You have a
vocabulary test tomorrow
as well.

Group 1- Willette, J. Anderson, Timm, M. Anderson
Group 2, Tarrant, S. Anderson, Benson, Suchodolski
Group 3, Bernelis, Beyer, Sneller, Seebeck,
Group 4 Casas, Chislea, Sanches, Rivera
Group 5 Cianek, Ciesla, Reed, Pitcher, Marchelewicz
Group 6 Elder, Freeman, Pelton, Mysliwski
Group 7 Garcia, Harper, Logan, Legner
Group 8 Herr, Irwin, Knight. Keenan,Burns

9th grade- 5th hour
Paragraph writing from last week. Handed back.

Login information- use same login.
You picked one paragraph to write last week. In computer lab, now you are going to type it. Double spaced. Times, New Roman, 12 point font.
When you are finished, you are to write the two other paragraphs, then type those as well. You are required to hand write them first, get my approval and then you can begin typing.
Create a folder for English on Google drive.
Go to SHMOOP and type in SPEAK. Watch video
NO PRINTING, no games.


4th hour
Group 1- Buck, Williamson, Bryan, Webster
Group 2- Tilley, Dodd, Steele, Domerese
Group 3- Spicher, Smith, Freese, Garcia
Group 4- Hernandez, Hodder, Simon, Sajdak
Group 5- Hugo, Husband, Rygwelski, Potter,
Group 6- Olson, Neal, Jatczak, Lee
Group 7- Mahan, Martin, Martindale, Matlock
9th - 5th Hour
Sit with your partner

Continue Reading Part 2- Second marking Period, p. 49 - 20 minutes
Continue working on your group drawings.
Must have: 6 drawings with color. Captions that explain the drawings. - 20 minutes
Continue reading- 20 minutes

Drawing is due today
Computer Lab 312.
Create a Folder in Google Drive labeled ENGLISH
Open Google Docs and label is Speak Chapter 1.
Type your assignment in this document. Move it into to this folder.



SSR- 10 minutes
Root test- 10 minutes
DO NOT MOVE THE DESKS.
Speak Read Third Marking period- or pick up where you left off. - 20 minutes
WMD's Springboard book, 1.9 Reading a Narrative Inteview
Full transcript