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Malnutrition and Diseases in the 1500s

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Nick hilgartner

on 1 September 2010

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Transcript of Malnutrition and Diseases in the 1500s

Malaria
Tiberculosis
"the consumption" one of the most common diseases
of the 1500s and 1600s
called the consumption because of limited medical knowledge. The cure, quanine was largley unavailable because it was
only grown in South America.
Most deadly disease of the 1500s and 1600s Many other diseases where called the consumption because of this Syphilis was a major disease of the time,
it was called "the great pox" Scurvy was prominent among sailors,
caused by lack of vitamins. Typhus, a fever spread by body lice
was common among the wars at the beginning
of the 1500s. Upper class could largley escape epidemics, by going into the country,
through the help of physcicians and visits to baths and hot springs, as well as
just an all around more comfortable lifestyle. A quarter of all infants, whether poor or wealthy died before their second birthday. Apparantly a sickness known only as "the sweat", or sweating sickness tended to affect members of the upper class more than the lower, and was characteristic of a high fever and sweating.
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