Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Desdemona as an object

No description
by

Luiz Hoelz

on 4 December 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Desdemona as an object

Desdemona as a posession
Specific words imply object connotations.
High Social Status vs.True Appearance
Desdemona may seem to be respected, but in general women during Elizabethan times were not.
Sexual references
She is referred to as an sexual object.
Gender Differences
Men disregard any type of social class towards women.
"I won his daughter over" (I, iii)
Even Othello, her own husband, refers to her as an object.
Desdemona as an Object
"Fetch Desdemona, hither" (I, iii)
Fetch has double meaning...
"Come, my dear love, The purchase made, the fruits are to ensue; that profit's yet to come 'tween me and you." (II, ii)
Purchase and profit's are key words.
Brabantio behavior
Father's daughters are considered possessions
"And, I'll warrant her, full of game." (II, iii)
"Look to your house, your daughter, and your bags! Thieves, thieves!" (I, i)
Reference to Brabantio being robbed.
"She is abused stol'n from me, and corrupted"
Another reference to Desdemona being an object.
"They are all but stomachs, and we are all but food; They eat us hungerly, and when they are full, they belch us." (III, iii)
Full transcript