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Trade Routes & Global Connectedness

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on 5 May 2014

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Transcript of Trade Routes & Global Connectedness

Body Paragraph #1
Essay #1
1.) Compare - Economic
Controlling Idea:
The participants in the Silk Road and I.O.M.S.both profited economically from trade as both networks created a supply and demand for goods that could not be obtained in their homeland
Compare & Contrast:
Thesis: In the 300-1450 CE, both the Silk Road and the Indian Ocean Trade diffused culture and religion; they also had different economic goals and methods of transporting goods.
Direct Comparison
Both the Silk Road and Indian Ocean Trade created a trading network across Eurasia and the Indian Ocean

Concrete Details
Significance
As Silk became a huge demand, merchants and traders became increasingly rich, which meant there were more workers to produce this material and lead to the general economic prosperity of the common person
Body Paragraph #2
2.) Compare - Culture
Controlling Idea:
Both the Silk Road and the Indian Ocean Trade diffused culture, religion, and technology.
Silk Road:
- China exported Silk across Eurasia and was the highest export of all items
- Silk, Porcelain, Tea, Spices, and Gunpowder were also traded along the Silk Road
Indian Ocean Trade:
- Items traded across the Indian Ocean were silk, cotton and porcelain.

Body Paragraph #3
3.) Contrast - Economic
Controlling Idea:

The Silk Road and the Indian Ocean differed on how they transported and profited from their goods

Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Direct Comparison
Concrete Details
Significance
Religion spread across both trade routes and impacted the culture of the people
- Buddhism was one of the major religions that flourished across the silk road and became one of the most dominant and powerful religions throughout.
- Along the Indian Ocean trade network, Islam was spread through merchants who sailed and diffused islam at trading ports they would stop at

New religions and ideas begin to spread across Eurasia and Ports across Africa which leads to the globe becoming connected through shared religion, language, and culture

As trade routes progressed, new technologies were created and and quickly spread across the globe


SILK ROAD: -Stirrups were created and was significant in the military

INDIAN OCEAN TRADE: - Dhow, Junk, Compass, Astrolabe, were all used to facilitate navigation
The Silk Road could be unsafe to travel and took longer while the Indian Ocean trade route was more reliable, cheap, and safe
Trade was facilitated and nations could trade easier, greatly increasing trade and innovation across the globe

- States along the silk road fought in wars and bandits were common, making trade along the silk road difficult and risky
- Trading along the I.O.M.S. was much more easier and safer. Pirating occurred, but was not as common. Also, it was cheaper than the Silk Road

Both the Silk Road and IOMS created a cultural shift in their regions

- In I.O.M.S. new wealthy trading ports and cities were created along the coast

- The Mongols stressed and encouraged trade, which gave it great wealth to Eurasia, increasing the merchants value and wealth

The Merchant class grew and the farmer's status fell, causing uneasiness in the society and perpetuated a shift from an agrarian to an urban society
Oceanic Trade could transport large amounts of goods more efficiently than the Silk Road

A deep shift began to occur from land trade to oceanic trade as it was more reliable, cheaper, and safer than the risky silk road.
- Merchants on the Silk Road were limited to items they could carry as they only had camels and caravans

- IOMS merchants utilized the monsoon winds to predict their course of travel making the voyage quicker
- Merchants could transport more goods as they had large ships to do so
With the aid of the monsoon winds and new ship innovations, oceanic trade became a prominent way of world trade.
Essay#2
Change and Continuity
The Silk Road and the Indian Ocean Maritime System
The Silk Road and the Trans-Saharan routes
Thesis:
Body Paragraph #1
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #1
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #2
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #3
HOW event #1 leads to event #2.

HOW event #2 leads to event #3.
Controlling Idea
Body Paragraph #2
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #1
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #2
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #3
HOW event #1 leads to event #2.

HOW event #2 leads to event #3.
Controlling Idea
Body Paragraph #3
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #1
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #2
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENT #3
HOW event #1 leads to event #2.

HOW event #2 leads to event #3.
Controlling Idea
Many cultures and religions saw change due to the spread from the Silk Road.
The Silk Road is created around 100 BC and is used as a means of connecting various nations politically, economically, and socially. Many of the connections that are made help the spread of religion.

Rulers see the trade network as a golden opportunity to spread their culture and religion. Many religions are spread, but Buddhism was the main religion spread along the trade routes.
King Ashoka of Mauryan India promoted Buddhism and encouraged Buddhist monks to spread the faith. The Buddhist monks followed the Silk road and brought the religion all throughout Asia
Nations used both routes to trade for items that could not be obtained in their homeland
Missionaries from each of the religions continue to spread their beliefs into the indigenous people. Through the evangelicalism, people start to convert to Buddhism, bringing a larger population to the Buddhist faith.
-The Chinese were eager for western products, such as : Horses, walnuts, sesame, spinach, and other new crops
- Traders going west carried new fruits such as peaches and apricots
Different religions become intertwined with each other to form new religions; many sects of the same religion also formed


A key factor for the growth and development of both trade routes was the eagerness of nations to obtain goods that could not be obtained in their homelands

Significance
Many parts and regions across Eurasia commence to become connected through religion, creating a Buddhist community that will eventually come to be one of the most dominant religions in the world.
Significance
Significance
Both trade routes created large and wealthy cities as well as important trading ports along the coast
- Merchants traveling the silk road needed places to stay during voyages, this created large wealthy cities

- Trading ports used as destination points along the Indian Ocean trade became wealthy as merchants invested their money in those ports.
Change, Silk Roads
Change, Trans-Saharan
Large cities, that would eventually become dominant political forces in Eurasia, were created as a result of these trade routes
Through the Trans-Saharan Trade Route, African leaders were able to spread the Muslim faith.
Islam was slowly and peacefully introduced into Africa by Muslim merchants. It was unpopular at first but later grew into the people; eventually many other people began to convert to the Islamic faith.

African leaders saw the need to revitalize the trade route and their economy; they also wanted to spread Islam to every corner of Africa
Mansa Musa embarks on a pilgrimage to mecca and shows the world his Islamic nation’s wealth and power. Through his journey he is able to successfully convert people from their current religion to Islam because of the position of power he holds.

Scholars and merchants around the world flock the Trans-Saharan in order to gain wealth and learn about Islam. Mansa Musa acts as a figurehead for Islamic faith in Africa, bringing more followers.
Mansa Musa saw the popularity of his pilgrimage and built the city of Timbuktu as a center of Islamic teaching and as a symbol of Islam in Africa


The Indian Ocean Trade was more technologically advanced than the Silk road
Islam becomes imbedded into African Culture and becomes more widely known throughout Africa and the world. Islam soon became the official religion of kingdoms in Africa and was the most popular religion in the region
- The Indian Ocean trade had useful navigational tools such as the astrolabe, compass, and junk ship which facilitated & expedited voyages.

- The Silk Road was reduced to camels, caravans, and wagons. Took significantly longer to reach their destination.
A more favorable shift of trading was leaning towards oceanic voyages because of how efficient and profitable it was to merchants and traders.
Continuity, Silk Road
Even though the Silk Road underwent significant changes, religion continued to thrive and spread across the the trade network
Even with the variety of rule and monopolies on the Silk Road, religion was still able to spread across the land.
The Roman Empire’s conquest of Egypt led the the blossoming of the Silk Road; many ideas and different religions were transmitted and traded along the trade network
The introduction of gunpowder led to the decline of integration in the Mongol Empire and trade declined; however, religion still spread slowly across the land
The ongols took over most of Asia and united it under their rule; not having to cross multiple countries and borders to trade goods stabilized trade

The fragmentation and disintegration of the mongol empire led to less focus on trade and control over the silk road
Mongol control helped stabilize the silk road and made the trade route safer, allowing for Buddhism to continue to spread. The mongols allowed their subjects to keep their own religion and even encouraged the spread of the beliefs

In the 300 through 1650's people's culture and practices began to change as a result of religion spreading across the Silk Road and Trans-Saharan, religion also conitnued to
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