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Motivation and Learning

TTI - Classroom Management
by

Mario Suarez

on 30 September 2013

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Transcript of Motivation and Learning

MOTIVATION
&
LEARNING

OBJECTIVES
Identify the features that define students and groups in terms of motivation.
Highlight the role the teacher plays in students' learning.
Distinguish a set of strategies to enhance the learning experience in the classroom.
CONTENTS
1. Learner's
2. Group's
3. Norms & Strategies
4. Teacher's Role
5. Teaching Practices
LEARNER'S MOTIVATION
Effort and Ability
Is the assessment of ability a predictor?
Motivation: success and failure
Failure-avoiding and success: luck
YOUNG LEARNERS & NOT SO YOUNG ONES
effort = worthiness
effort = ability = achievement
effort affect
"Smart students try, dumb ones don't"
1st Grader
no ability makes the effort not profitable
ability = success
humiliation = effort without success
failure avoiding = no humiliation
"If someone is not smart, they can do only so well"
High School Student
STRATEGIES
FOCUS IS WILLINGNESS TO LEARN
Non-Competitive Instruction:
pursuit of success NOT avoidance of failure
study time should be self-compared
Contract Learning:
action plan agreements
Teach Learning-to-Learn Strategies:
question-asking
problem-solving
VALUE IDEAS AND THE PRODUCTIVE
USE OF THE MIND
GROUP'S MOTIVATION
Relations
Attraction:
Acceptance:
attractiveness
similarities
perceived competence
a complex human being:
values & imperfections
Group Cohesiveness
High level of acceptance to even
Override negative feelings
Learn about each other
Interaction
Shared Group History
Public Commitment
Projects
Teacher's Role Model
Norms & Roles
Norms - General
Roles - Specific
Norms - Student's achievement and morale
Norms - Social Products
Lasting - Discussion and acceptance
Priority
Role - Balance
Group & Individual
life & productivity
necessity & complement
Satisfaction
Self-Image
Personal Contribution
Encourage exploration
Prepare for the role
Leadership
Autocratic groups were more productive.
The quality of the products in demogractic groups was superior.
Interpersonal relations were far better in demographic groups.
Findings
Autocratic
Democratic
Laissez-faire
Being a Facilitator
(Heron, 1999)
Hierarchical
- Full responsibility for curriculum design and instruction
Cooperative
- assisted devising and negotiated outcomes
Autonomous
- set conditions so student's self-determination can flourish
Group Development
&
Control
a well-prepared withdrawal of scaffolding rather than an abandonment of responsibilities
Motivational Practices Are a Process
Generate
Maintain
Positive Retrospection
Enhance Values & Attitudes
Increase Expectancy of Success
Increase Student's Goal-Orientedness
Make Materials Relevant
Foster Realistic Beliefs
Self-Motivating Strategies
Commitment:
Keeping favorable intentions
Metacognition:
Identifying distractiors, focusing on steps
Satiation:
Adding a Twist
Emotion:
Using relaxation and meditation
Environment:
asking friends for help, eliminating distractors
Control
Promote effort attributions and avoid ability attributions.
attribution: the explanation people offer about why they succeded or failed
"Although boring lessons can be very unpleasant and sometimes excrutiatingly painful, boredom itself does not seem to affect the short-term effectiveness of learning"
(Wlodkowski in Dörnyei 2001)
References
Covington (1984) The Self-Worth Theory of Motivation: Findings and Implications.
Dörnyei (2001) Creating a Motivational Classroom Environment.
Sullo (2011) The Motivated Student: Five Strategies to Inspire.
(Lewis et al, 1939)
Full transcript