Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Ethics Panel

No description
by

Ashley DeLuca

on 11 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Ethics Panel

Student Thoughts
No intent to engage in the acts of lying, stealing, or cheating
Desire to be well prepared and present extra material
Possibly researched and answered tasks themselves
Enhanced learning experience due to better preparation
Benefit outweighed doubt of whether this was an Honor Code violation.
SU HONOR CODE
Violations of the honor code include:
Cheating
Plagiarism
Falsification
Tampering with records
Forgery
Withholding information
Breech of Confidence
Academic Theft
CI CASE GUIDE:
Facilitator Responsibility
“Review, discuss, and clarify expectations for group functioning, including professional and group behavior, appropriate attitude, student responsibilities, session overview and formatting, and case-specific requirements for grading” (A. Schempp, personal communication, 2013).
CI EVALUATION DEFINITIONS:
P
R
E
P
A
R
A
T
I
O
N
"Consistently prepared, present extra material, support statements with appropriate references, and make concise summaries" (A. Schempp, personal communication, 2013).
Ethical Dilemmas in Academic Integrity
Student's Perspective
Faculty Perspective
"Education aims at the development of critical thinking, specialized knowledge, autonomy, ethical and aesthetic sensitivity in the learner.” (Chapfika 2008, p 47).
Virtue Ethics
Rule Consequentialism
Academic Integrity
The moral code or ethical policy of academia

Academic integrity in any educational experience matters; especially when student mastery may literally mean life or death.
Conclusion
Students should have known their actions were not virtuous
Any benefit of being prepared for the exercise was outweighed by the the lost learning opportunity of the CI process.
The ethical development of the student requires consequences of the unethical actions to prevent further lapses both as students and as future professionals.
We concur with the proposed solutions of the scenario. The students are to receive zeros for the facilliation grade on this exercise.
You are the facilitator of a CI case and notice that the group has all the answers complete for the tasks in advance and several of the students have a copy of last year’s similar case pulled up on their computers. All students attended a presentation on academic integrity during orientation. All of the students in the group should get zeros for their facilitation grade.
Scenario
Virtue Ethics
One's potential is already inherent; one only seeks to nurture, develop, and maximize their own potential (Morrison & Furlong, 2014)
Double-Effect Principle
The intended outcome of an action is good, but an unintended side effect of the action may lead to evil
Professional Dishonesty
“Allowing dishonesty affects the likelihood and frequency of future dishonest incidents occurring,” (Parameswaran, 2007, p 267).
Rule Consequentialism
Similar to virtue ethics
Achieve the greatest outcome for the highest number of people
Establishment of rules by an authority figure in order to positively benefit a group of people
Virtue Ethics
Developing and perfecting character potential to a level of eudaimonia.

Becoming a healthcare professional:
Engage in virtuous acts
Learn critical attributes
Honesty
Integrity
References
Megan Dager, Ashley DeLuca,Lori Dodd, Emily Engel, Jennie Ferraro, Lauren Fraser, and Gary Horewitz
The End
References
However the good effect must be proportionate to, or outweigh the bad effect
Chapfika, B. (2008). The role of integrity in higher education. International Journal for Educational Integrity, 4(1):43-49.

Harding, T.S., Carpenter, D.D., Finelli, C.J., Passow, H.J., (2004). Does Academic Dishonesty Relate to Unethical Behavior in Professional Practice? An Exploratory Study. Science and Engineering Ethics, 10(2):1-14.

Morrison, E.E. & Furlong, B. (2014). Health care ethics: Critical issues for the 21st Century, 3rd Edition. Jones & Bartlett.

Parameswaran, A. (2007). Student dishonesty and faculty responsibility. Teaching in Higher Education, 12(2):263-274.

Tuckey, L., & Slowther, A. (2009). The Doctrine of Double Effect and end-of-life decisions. Clinical Ethics, 4(1), 12-14.

(2013). Evaluation Definitions. (Available from the Shenandoah University Physician Assistant Department, Suite 430 1460 University Dr Winchester, VA 22601)
(2013). CI Case Seminar Guide 2013. (Available from the Shenandoah University Physician Assistant Department, 402 1460 University Dr Winchester, VA 22601)
Theories
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for: PA-611 Humanities for the PA Profession
to Rachel Carlson
9/11/13
(Morrison & Furlong, 2014)
Al-Dwairi, Z. N. B.D.S, Ph.D. & Al-Waheidi, E. M. B.D.S., Ph.D. (2004). Cheating Behavior of Dental Students. Journal of Dental Education, 68(11).

Chapfika, B. (2008). The role of integrity in higher education. International Journal for Educational Integrity, 4(1): 43-49.

Danielsen, R. Ph.D., PA-C, Simon, A.F. DHSc, PA-C, & Pavlick, R. Ph.D. (2006) The Culture of Cheating: From the Classroom to the Exam Room. Journal of Physician Assistant Education, 17(1):23-29.

Kusnoor, A. V. MD & Falik, R. MD (2013) Cheating in Medical School: The Unacknowledged Ailment. Southern Medical Journal 106(8).

Morrison, E.E. & Furlong, B. (2014). Health care ethics: Critical issues for the 21st Century, 3rd Edition. Jones & Bartlett.

Parameswaran, A. (2007). Student dishonesty and faculty responsibility. Teaching in Higher Education, 12(2):263-274.

Tuckey, L., & Slowther, A. (2009). The Doctrine of Double Effect and end-of-life decisions. Clinical Ethics, 4(1), 12-14.

Board of Trustees. (2013). Shenandoah University Honor Code (Available online at: http://www.su.edu/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/Honor-Code-May-2013.pdf)
Full transcript