Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands

No description
by

Lisa Cheng

on 7 December 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands

Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands Location and Landscape • Flat
• Swampy
• Swampy areas called Muskeg
• Lots of frozen ground most of the year
• Ponds, lakes and streams
• Long coastline
• Permafrost
What does it look like? - Possibly formed at the end of Pleistocene epoch (the last ice age) - Hudson Bay lowlands are located near the Where is it located? How did it form? - Heavy weight of the glaciers sunk the Canadian Shield and the area became lowlands when the glaciers retreated Natural Resources Arctic Fox Beluga Whale Black Bear Some Animals Found in the Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands Include: Blackpoll Warbler Brook Trout Greater Yellowleg Melissa Arctic Butterfly Moose Polar Bear Sandhill Crane Woodland Caribou Some Trees/Plants Found in the Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands Include: What is the size? Hudson Bay- 320 000 km squared
The Arctic (Whole)- 2.6 million km squared south-western shore of James and Hudson Bay - Arctic Lowlands are the islands scattered up in Canada’s far North Aspen Balsam Fir Elephant Head Glasswort Rock Sedge White Spruce Some Minerals and Other Resources that can be found there are: By: Hannah Cross, Kaila Hunter, and Lisa Cheng Food and Culture Overview of the Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands - Possibly formed at the end of Pleistocene epoch (the last ice age)
- Heavy weight of the glaciers sunk the Canadian Shield and the area Where is it located? - Hudson Bay lowlands are located near the south-western shore of James and Hudson Bay
- Arctic Lowlands are the islands scattered up in Canada’s far North What is the size? - Hudson Bay Lowland- 320 000 km squared
- The Arctic (Whole)- 2.6 million km squared What does it look like? - Flat
- Swampy
- Swampy areas called Muskeg
- Lots of frozen ground most of the year
- Ponds, lakes and streams
- Long coastline
- Permafrost How did it form? became lowlands when the glaciers retreated Overview of the Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands Animals that can be Found in the Hudson Bay and Arctic Lowlands:
- Arctic Fox
- Beluga Whale
- Brook Trouth
- Black Bear
- Blackpoll Warbler
- Melissa Arctic Butterfly
- Moose
- Polar Bear
- Sandhill Crane
- Woodland Caribou
Plants and Trees that can be Found in the Hudson Bay and Arctic Lowlands:
- Aspen
- Elephant Head
- Balsam Fir
- Glasswort
- Rock Sedge
- White Spruce Bannock
Bannock may be baked in the oven or over a charcoal or open fire (recipe for Bannock on a Stick follows).

Ingredients
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 Tablespoon sugar
2 Tablespoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
2 cups milk (or water)

Procedure
Combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
Measure the milk (or water) and add it to the flour mixture, stirring with a fork to combine. Dough should form. If the mixture seems too dry and crumbly, add more liquid, one Tablespoon at a time.
Turn the dough out onto a surface lightly coated with flour. Knead for about 3 minutes. (To knead, press down the dough, turn it clockwise, fold it in half and press it down. Repeat.)
Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
Pat the dough into a circle about ¾-inch thick. Transfer the dough to a well-greased cookie sheet. Prick the surface of the dough all over with a fork.
Bake about 20 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Bibliography Andrew, Wayne, Andrew Griffin, and Wendy Mader. The Arctic . Toronto: Thomson Nelson, 2004.

Clark, Bruce, and John K. Wallace. "Landform Connections." In Making Connections: Canada's Geography. Scarborough, Ont.: Prentice Hall Ginn Canada, 1999. 109.

"Food in Canada Aboriginals - Canadian Aboriginal Food, Canadian Aboriginal Cuisine - traditional, popular, recipe, diet, history, common, rice, people, make, customs, fruits, bread, vegetables, bread, eating, cooking, cake, meat, snack." Food in Every Country.

http://www.foodbycountry.com/Algeria-to-France/Canada-Aboriginals.html(accessed March 2, 2011).

"Hudson Bay Lowlands." Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources / Ministère des Richesses naturelles de l'Ontario. http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/Business/Biodiversity/2ColumnSubPage/STEL02_166949.html (accessed March 2, 2011).

Marsh, James. "Hudson Bay - The Canadian Encyclopedia." The Canadian Encyclopedia. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0003881 (accessed March 2, 2011).

Parks Canada. "Parks Canada - National Parks System Plan - National Parks System Plan, 3rd Edition - Hudson Bay Lowlands." Parcs Canada | Parks Canada. http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/nation/sec4.aspx (accessed March 2, 2011).
Parks Canada. "Parks Canada - National Parks System Plan - National Parks System Plan, 3rd Edition - Arctic Lowlands." Parcs Canada | Parks Canada. http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/nation/sec6.aspx (accessed March 2, 2011).

The Ministry of Natural Resources. "Hudson Bay Lowlands." Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources / Ministère des Richesses naturelles de l'Ontario. http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/Business/Biodiversity/2ColumnSubPage/STEL02_166949.html (accessed March 2, 2011).

http://myclass.peelschools.org/ele/4/16795/Lessons/Physical%20Regions%20of%20Canada%20Comparison%20Chart.docx
http://www.markville.ss.yrdsb.edu.on.ca/teacher/geography/9/Academic/LANDFORM%20REGIONS%20IN%20CANADA%20%20PPP.ppt#265,10,HUDSON BAY LOWLANDS - the Arctic and Hudson’s Bay Lowlands are so far from other major cities, transportation can be expensive
- when shipping food and goods from other places, ships and planes are not unusual
- food found in grocery stores can also become expensive
“A four-litre bad of milk that costs around $4.30 in Toronto could cost about $16 in some smaller Arctic communities.” - dog sledding, kayaking, and snowmobiling is popular - soups were also a common meal.
One in particular was named the ‘Three Sister Soup’
consisted of corn, beans, and squash
- snacks can be found on the trail
few things that actually grow, edible plants include sorrel, crowberries, arctic blueberries, and arctic cranberries
- Bannock is basically any type of flat quick breads

- due to the cold climate of the lowlands, not many edible plants are grown
- native people are dependent meat and fish
- traditional diet of these natives was very high in calories
- calories are necessary to keep their bodies warm in the cold, long winter months - included seals (hunted by dogs), whales, caribou, and polar bear
- slaughtered animals are useful in other ways
Seal hides are used for boots and clothing.
Whale skins are used for kayaks and tents.
- common fish in Hudson’s Bay are cod, halibut, salmon and polar plaice. Animals that were Eaten Normal Everyday Foods The Shipping and Selling of Food Interesting Facts - many people go there to fish hunt and trap - Palaeozoic sedimentary rock contains a form of coal called lignite, oil, and natural gas deposits - Palaeozoic sedimentary rock contains a form of coal called lignite, oil, and natural gas deposits - the only eco-zone that is touching a body of salt water and tides - touching a body of salt water
hydro-electric dams - touching a body of salt water Minerals that can be Found in the Hudson Bay and Arctic Lowlands: - Polar Bear Provincial Park, Ontario's largest protected area is found in the Hudson Bay lowlands Animals that were Eaten - included seals (hunted by dogs), whales, caribou, and polar bear
- slaughtered animals are useful in other ways
Seal hides are used for boots and clothing.
Whale skins are used for kayaks and tents.
- common fish in Hudson’s Bay are cod, halibut, salmon and polar plaice. Overview of the Arctic and Hudson Bay Lowlands Normal Everyday Foods - soups were also a common meal.
One in particular was named the ‘Three Sister Soup’
consisted of corn, beans, and squash
- snacks can be found on the trail
few things that actually grow, edible plants include sorrel, crowberries, arctic blueberries, and arctic cranberries
- Bannock is basically any type of flat quick breads

- due to the cold climate of the lowlands, not many edible plants are grown
- native people are dependent meat and fish
- traditional diet of these natives was very high in calories
- calories are necessary to keep their bodies warm in the cold, long winter months The Shipping and Selling of Food - the Arctic and Hudson’s Bay Lowlands are so far from other major cities, transportation can be expensive
- when shipping food and goods from other places, ships and planes are not unusual
- food found in grocery stores can also become expensive
“A four-litre bad of milk that costs around $4.30 in Toronto could cost about $16 in some smaller Arctic communities.”
Full transcript