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Extended HOTS Questions

Updated for 2014-2015 online literature course Session Five
by

Adele Raemer

on 30 September 2014

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Transcript of Extended HOTS Questions

Extended HOTS questions must be practiced in class. One suggestion for practicing them is to give the students a specific thinking skill and make them answer a question using that skill.
Once they are able to do this, they can be allowed to choose a skill on their own, as they are required to do on the exam.

Let’s give it a try…

Tip #1:

The student should first choose the thinking skill, write the name of the skill, and then answer the question using that skill. As seen earlier, answers will vary according to the skill that has been chosen.

Here is one more example from Module F…

Extended HOTS questions ask the student to choose a particular HOTS to answer a question and then use it in their answer. The answer must show the appropriate use of the chosen thinking skill.


Teaching your students to use Higher-Order Thinking Skills when answering Extended HOTS questions

Will George Stoyonovich from A Summer’s Reading read all the books? Answer the question using the HOTS of Explaining Patterns.

Possible answer…

No, George will not read all of the books. He has
a pattern of behavior
of not completing what he starts. He dropped out of school and he quit every job he had after school. He will start to read the books, but he will stop, just like he has stopped everything else that he has started in his life.

Now let’s answer the same question using the HOTS of Inferring Remember, the question is: Will George Stoyonovich from A Summer’s Reading read all the books?

Possible answer…

After practicing with your students, use the following guidelines to help your students answer the question on their own:

After they have chosen the HOTS they want to use to answer the question, they need to write the name of the chosen Thinking Skill.

We can infer that George will read all of the books. Mr. Cattanzara is a “change maker” and
we can infer from his job title
that he has made a change in George. In addition, George goes to the library in the fall, which is a season of change,
so we can infer from this
that he really is a changed person.

Go through the list of HOTS and think about which ones could be used to answer the question.

Review the answer, checking for words that clearly show use of the chosen HOTS. Encourage students to use words from the Vocabulary for Thinking Skills list in the Handbook.

Tip #2

Although it is possible to use more than one HOTS to answer a question, the student must choose only one. The chosen HOTS must be an appropriate one. For example…

Mr. Cattanzara is an unhappy man. How do we know this from the story?
[Module D, Summer 2012]

Thinking skill I chose: Explaining Patterns

Answer: Mr. Cattanzara is intelligent. We know this because he reads The New York Times. However, he works in the subway station, which isn’t a very good job. He also gets drunk a lot. This pattern of behavior shows that he is frustrated with his life.

Tip #3

There must be evidence of use of the HOTS in the student’s answer. Therefore, students should learn and use the vocabulary for thinking skills, which can be found in the Literature Handbook. Using the appropriate vocabulary will help the students to answer the questions.

Examples:

Inferring:
infer, deduce, conclude, read between the lines, assume

Comparing and contrasting:
like, similarly, in the same way, compared to, in comparison, unlike, in contrast with, on the contrary, however

Distinguishing different perspectives:
point of view, on the one hand…on the other hand


Now they are ready to answer the question using the chosen HOTS.

At the end of the story Waverly thinks to herself: “Opposite me was my opponent, two angry black slits. She wore a triumphant smile.” How does Waverly see her relationship with her mother at this point in the story?
[Module F, Summer 2012]

Thinking skill I chose:
Explaining Cause and Effect

Answer: As Waverly becomes more successful at chess, she begins to assert her independence.
This causes her mother to try to control her
by watching over her as she practices and giving her advice. This, in turn,
causes a conflict
between Waverly and her mother that reaches its peak in the market, when Waverly is disrespectful and runs away from Mrs. Jong.
As a result
, at this point in the story, Waverly sees her mother as her rival.

And an example from Module D…


Mr. Cattanzara is an unhappy man. How do we know this from the story?
[Module D, Summer 2012]

Thinking skill I chose:
Explaining Patterns

Answer: Mr. Cattanzara is intelligent. We know this because he reads The New York Times. However, he works in the subway station, which isn’t a very good job. He also gets drunk a lot.
This pattern of behavior
shows that he is frustrated with his life.


How does the education Waverly gets from her mother help make her a good chess player?  Give information from the story to support your answer. [Module F, Moed Bet 2013]

Which HOTS could be used to answer this question? Which HOTS would be inappropriate?

Thinking skill: Explaining cause and effect
Answer:

Waverly’s mother teaches her the art of invisible strength in which you get the things you want by not showing your emotions.  This taught Waverly to stay cool and focused while playing chess and this is what caused her success at chess.




This is an appropriate HOTS to answer the question and this is a good answer.
Thinking skill: Inferring
Answer:

Waverly’s mother taught her the art of invisible strength in which you get the things you want by not showing your emotions.  I can infer that this helped Waverly at chess because she was cool and focused while playing.

Although the actual answer to the question is good, this is not an appropriate HOTS. The story explicitly states that Waverly uses invisible strength to succeed at chess, so this is not inferred.
Have students read through the list of HOTS and think about which ones could be used to answer the question.
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