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The Deaf Community and Culture - Sharon S

AUSLAN and Visual Communication EDUC20076
by

Sharon Sunny

on 21 July 2014

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Transcript of The Deaf Community and Culture - Sharon S

THE DEAF COMMUNITY AND CULTURE
FEATURES OF AUSLAN
The wide variety and distinctions in signs to mean many different words are achieved by altering different features of the sign.

The features that we can utilise to obtain this result are:

1. Handshape - refers to the shape that the palm is adopting
There are a few major handshapes that are used repeatedly but can mean different things as defined by context or the following features. 2 signs may look very similar but differ on its handshapes e.g. beach and sheep. There are 62 handshapes of which 37 are the core handshapes. Some handshapes are used alot more often than others (Horton, 2010)

2. Orientation - this refers to the direction in which the hand/palm is pointing. (Auslan Grammar, 2013)

3. Location - this refers to the location of the hand on the body i.e. hand at nose/ head/ mouth etc

Handshapes at a fixed location can also serve to connote a designated meaning. Example: Number at nose denotes age

4. Movement - refers to the movement or path that the hand follows to connote a meaning. movements can be repeated.
2 signs can be very similar in all other features but the movement serves to distinguish them. An exmaple of this would be the words - clever and know.
Another feature is the direction of movement. 2 signs can be exactly the same except in that the hand points or moves in a different direction. E.g. here and there (Horton, 2010)
DEVICES WITHIN AUSLAN
1. VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Auslan is a form of visual communication and is only possible through face to face interactions between people. It utilises space, directionality and facial features in a very unique method of conversation (Horton, 2010).

2. POINTING SIGNS: These are used in contextualising certain signs and also serve to identify body parts or objects proximal to the signer (Horton, 2010).

3. DEPICTING SIGNS: These signs help to set the scene. For example, the signer can first sign the noun and then utilise depicting signs to describe the subject. this is similar to the manner in which we use adjectives in English (Hodge & Ferrera, 2013)

4. ENACTMENT: This refers to the signer enacting scenes in a narrative method. This is the construction of action and scene to retell a scenario and is very much linked to performance. Enactment is also linked to narrative stories (Horton, 2010)

5. LEXICALISED SIGNS: these refer to the official widely- used signs for nouns that are established in Auslan.

SYDNEY
TOORAK
FINGER SPELLING
AUSLAN FINGER SPELLING
IMAGE CREDITS:
Glickman, K.
Deaf Culture As Seen Through the Eyes of a Deaf Comedian.
Retrieved from http://www.oocities.org/humorbynutty/deaf_links.html


References:
Horton, A. (2010).
Insights into Auslan.
Retrieved from
http://deafsocietynsw.org.au/documents/SignLanguage1Handouts.pdf

Auslan Grammar and Structure.
(2013). Retrieved from
http://www.deafchildrenaustralia.org.au/auslan-grammar-and-structure

Hodge, G., & Ferrera, L. (2013).
Showing the story: Enactment as performance in Auslan narrative. Retrieved from http://als2013.arts.unimelb.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/WS2_HodgeFerrara_102.pdf

Finger spelling is a method for the deaf to sign names or nouns. Alternatively, fingerspelling is also used to clarify a sign or a word.
Fingerspelling can also be used even when there is a sign for the word.

The most commonly fingerspelled words are: SO, TO, IF, BUT, DO, AT.
Rhythmic clusters in spelling of letters make it more easily understood. Sometimes, not all letters of the word have to be spelt out!

Fingerspelling is also incorporated into certain lexicalised signs to give meaning (What is fingerspelling?, 2013).

In the past, signers used to finger spell every single word!
SIGNS WE HAVE LEARNT
Collingwood
Geelong
MELBOURNE
Places in The World
Places In Australia
AUSTRALIA
ENGLAND
USA
SHOPKEEPER
MANAGER
RETIRED
SOCIAL WORKER
TEACHER
ACCOUNTANT
MCDONALDS
TRUCK DRIVER
CATERER
FLIGHT ATTENDANT
MODEL
NURSE
SOCCER
NETBALL
WALKING
YOGA
DANCING
FOOTBALL
SWIMMING
RUNNING
BASEBALL
TENNIS
PLACES
OCCUPATION
OTHER VOCABULARY
DEAF
HEARING
BUSINESS
RESTAURANT
FAMOUS
SCIENCE
PHONE
INTERVIEW
PAPER
COMMUNICATION
LIKE
SISTER
DINNER
UNDERSTAND
COMMON PHRASES
THANK YOU
PLEASE
SORRY
EXCUSE ME
WHERE
GO
HELP
DANGER
MONEY
YES
AUSLAN FACTSHEET
Other features of Auslan:
NON MANUAL FEATURES:

This refers to the movement and manipulation of features such as the head, eyebrows, eyes, mouth, shoulders and body.
Actions include frowning, shaking head, wrinkling nose etc. (Horton, 2010).
STRESS AND DURATION
Some actions can be exaggerated or stressed during signing to show intensity or give emphasis. Alternatively, these signs can be repeated multiple times (Horton, 2010).
Prevalence of severe to profound deafness in our society is estimated to be 1/1000
There are about 7000 Auslan users in Australia
Auslan was only recognised as a language in the 1980s.
Auslan has its roots in British Sign Language and a small influence from Irish Sign Language
Auslan is a visually based language that takes full advantage of the use of space, with its own syntax (rules) and vocabulary and the ability to communicate a rich variety of concepts and subtle meanings. (
Auslan incorporates signs (established and productive), finger spelling, body movements, facial expression, mouth and eye movements, mime and gesture. The result is communication that is fluent, easy, and sophisticated.
St Kilda
YOGA
HOBBIES
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