Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

AP English Literature Exam Review

No description
by

Donna Elliott

on 2 May 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of AP English Literature Exam Review

AP English Literature
Exam Review

Multiple Choice Section:
One hour to answer 45-60 questions (usually around 53)
You will have two prose passages and two poems.

Be sure to answer ALL the questions; there is NO PENALTY for guessing.
Circle the ones you are skipping and go back and fill in an answer before time is up.
Some questions will be more difficult than others.

Don’t waste too much time on the difficult questions—what matters is that you get a certain amount of points (a little over half) to pass.
Remember that there are easy questions towards the end. Skim the questions—don’t miss the one about alliteration because you ran out of time.
Don’t second guess yourself. (Sometimes a “list” is just a list.)


On the Q1 and Q2 essays, don’t forget the literary terms. No matter how oddly the prompt is worded, the task is the always the same: Talk about tone, diction, imagery, syntax, and why they matter. Take some time (5 minutes) to think about what the MC poems mean on a literal level. (Remember “My Picture”; the questions were easy once you understood the poem). Make sure you understand what the prompt is asking for before starting to write. Make a brief outline (copy the one from the white board) to keep you focused on the prompt.Make sure you understand what the prompt is asking for before starting to write. Make a brief outline (copy the one from the white board) to keep you focused on the prompt.Remember to consider the title of the poem. It can offer clues to the meaning (“Helen” and “To Helen”). The shape of the poem, how it actually looks on the page, can also mean something.On Q3, you might have a list of book as suggestions, or you might not. Remember that the book you write over does NOT have to be on the list. It DOES need to be “of literary merit.” On Q3, you might have a list of book as suggestions, or you might not. Remember that the book you write over does NOT have to be on the list. It DOES need to be “of literary merit.” On Q3, you might have a list of book as suggestions, or you might not. Remember that the book you write over does NOT have to be on the list. It DOES need to be “of literary merit.” Read the prompt, think about which book or play would fit, and then go with the one you feel most comfortable with. Be confident. Throw it all out there! You have nothing to lose, and college credit to gain.Read the prompt, think about which book or play would fit, and then go with the one you feel most comfortable with. Be confident. Throw it all out there! You have nothing to lose, and college credit to gain.Read the prompt, think about which book or play would fit, and then go with the one you feel most comfortable with. Be confident. Throw it all out there! You have nothing to lose, and college credit to gain.Things I’ve Noticed Lately in TWs:Things I’ve Noticed Lately in TWs:Things I’ve Noticed Lately in TWs:Things I’ve Noticed Lately in TWs:“Close reading” means looking at how specific literary devices (tone, diction, imagery, syntax, meter, form) work;As long as you have time keep going back and forth between your essays, adding more to this one, adding another paragraph to that one. You really don’t know exactly what the AP readers will be looking for so just throw it all out there as long as you have time. You can rest later. You can sleep later next year when you don’t have to drag yourself to a Comp I or Comp II class.
(Remember “My Picture”; the questions were easy once you understood the poem).
It’s better to comprehend the poem FIRST and get the questions right than to rush through and miss them.
*On the MC, the poems are more about literal comprehension, not deep analysis.
*Treat it like a puzzle—figure out a piece at a time.
*Start with the part that you understand and go from there.

Essays
On the Q1 and Q2 essays, don’t forget the literary terms.

No matter how oddly the prompt is worded, the task is the always the same: Talk about tone, diction, imagery, syntax, rhythm, meter, and why they matter.
You will have 2 hours to write 3 essays:

*Poem (or possibly two poems) (or...rarely... an excerpt from a play)
*Prose passage
*Free Response (over a novel or play of your choice)
The suggested time is 40 minutes per essay. You get them all at one time; you can go back and forth between as you think of more to add to each one. Don't conclude any of them until time is almost up. Keep adding to them as long as possible.
Make sure you understand what the prompt is asking for before starting to write.
Make a brief outline (copy the one from the white board) to keep you focused on the prompt.
Isn’t it….Ironic. Irony is almost always there, but is very subtle. If you can identify it, this will take you a long way towards figuring out the deeper meaning of the passage.
Remember to consider the title of the poem. It can offer clues to the meaning (“Helen” and “To Helen”).
Also, the shape (form) of the poem, how it actually looks on the page, can also mean something. (If it's 14 lines, and square, it's a SONNET.)
Separation of stanzas could mean changes in perspective/time/speaker, etc.
On Q3, you might have a list of books as suggestions, or you might not. Remember that the book you write over does NOT have to be on the list. It DOES need to be “of literary merit...something you have read in AP or Pre-AP.”
Read the prompt, think about which book or play would fit the prompt, and then go with the one you feel most comfortable with/the one you can say the most about. Be confident. Throw it all out there! You have nothing to lose, and college credit to gain.
Things I’ve Noticed Lately in Timed Writings:
Remember that, first and foremost, you are writing an analysis of how literary devices are used, not a paraphrase of the poem or prose passage.
“Close reading” means looking at how specific literary devices (tone, diction, imagery, syntax, meter, form, symbolism) work; it is not a commentary on the passage as a whole.
It’s OK to put in your own ideas, but first make sure you have
answered the prompt
.
Before you decide you are finished, look at the prompt again and then look at your essay. Ask yourself, “Did I answer the question?” If not, add another paragraph or two.
Above All……
Please don’t quit. You’ll be “finished” with your three essays and still have time left. Push yourself. There is ALWAYS something else you can say.
Go through your mental list of literary terms.

Think about rhyme, rhythm and meter. Does it add to the meaning?
Don’t draw pictures in the essay booklet; this tells them that you had nothing else to say. Doodle on the scratch paper if it helps you think.
Remember that it’s better to be in the middle of a thought when time runs out. They are trained to give you credit for what you WOULD have said. Don’t say “In conclusion….”
Some people will quit. They’ll put their head down, or tap their pen, or be looking around. Give them a mean look for me, please! And keep going.
As long as you have time keep going back and forth between your essays, adding more to this one, adding another paragraph to that one. You really don’t know exactly what the AP readers will be looking for so just throw it all out there as long as you have time. You can rest later. You can sleep later next year when you don’t have to drag yourself to a Comp I or Comp II class.
Tonight…
The only studying you should do is to look over your list of literary terms, to remind yourself of what you could write about if you run out of ideas. Have your two or three novels picked out and think about them. You might read some plot summaries online. Don’t stay up late. Eat breakfast in the morning!
Most of you have been in my class for two years and you are as prepared as anyone else who will take this exam and MORE prepared than most. Show them what you’ve got! Put it all out there. Take chances!


• Read as if you were reading the passage aloud to an audience emphasizing meaning and intent.

• As corny as it may seem, hear those words in your head.

• This technique may seem childish, but it works. Using your fi nger as a pointer, underscore the line as you are reading it aloud in your head. This forces you to slow down and to really notice the text. This will be helpful when you have to refer to the passage.

• Use all the information given to you about the passage, such as title, author, date of publication, and footnotes.

• Be aware of foreshadowing.

• Be aware of thematic lines and be sensitive to details that will obviously be material for multiple-choice questions.

• When reading poetry, pay particular attention to enjambment and end-stopped lines because they carry meaning.

• With poetry, it’s often helpful to paraphrase a stanza, especially if the order of the lines has been inverted.

*Slow down and read with your senses of sight, sound, and touch.

* Underline, circle, bracket, or highlight the text.

* Read closely, paying attention to punctuation and rhythms of the lines or sentences.
Read as if you were reading the passage aloud to an audience emphasizing meaning and intent.

As corny as it may seem, hear those words in your head.

This technique may seem childish, but it works. Using your finger as a pointer, underscore the line as you are reading it aloud in your head. This forces you to slow down and to really notice the text. This will be helpful when you have to refer to the passage.

*Use all the information given to you about the passage, such as title, author, date of publication, and footnotes.

* Be aware of foreshadowing.

* Be aware of thematic lines and be sensitive to details that will obviously be material for multiple-choice questions.

When reading poetry, pay particular attention to enjambment and end-stopped lines because they carry meaning.

With poetry, it’s often helpful to paraphrase a stanza, especially if the order of the lines has been inverted.

Remember that the prompt will be worded "awkwardly." Put it in plain, easy-to-understand language, including all parts of it. Then make a quick outline of your answer.
Question 2 (the prose passage)
is almost always
over
Characterization, even though it won't be that plainly stated.
(Remember Max's "relation to place." Figure out what you can determine about a character from setting/other characters/tone shifts/diction used (look for repetition of words)/allusions/images used/syntax...anything, really.
Just keep this question in mind...
What does it
tell me about this character?

Think about "form." Can you say anything
about the physical "shape" of the poem that answers the prompt focus?
Pay attention to
tone shifts
. A poem
tells a story and the tone shifts guide
the story. "But" "So" "Now" "Then"
After you've gone through your list of "go to"
elements (tone, diction, imagery), do some
digging into
word connotations
. This will
distinguish you from other essays. Find an
unusual but meaningful word(s) and explore
associations/how it relates to the prompt.
Underline repeated words and phrases; note the shifts that change the perspective/time/tone
("but" "yet" "however" "today")

Some of their favorite literary terms:

Apostrophe
--addressing someone/something directly
Dramatic Monologue
--speaker reveals their own character
Metaphysical Conceit
--elaborate (and odd) comparison
Elegy
--mourn a loss (adjective form: elegiac)
Narrative
--tells a story
Lyric Poetry
--subjective and emotional

AP=Answer the Prompt--ALL of the prompt

Take a picture of the quick outline on the white board and look at it between the MC and Essay portions.
Full transcript