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Choice and Why it Matters

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by

David Brownman

on 11 December 2013

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Transcript of Choice and Why it Matters

Why are games different?
Games give choice where movies, music don't.
Can pick a "good" or "bad" answer
Ditching the Binary
What if instead of good/bad, we had more realistic qualities:
Each Situation Evolves Organically
A collection of pre-approved
phrases allow a lot of flexibility
without compromising the
narrative.
Agency and Choice
by David Brownman
Choices need to feel like they matter.
Choices need to feel organic.
Only a few choices actually matter; story sticks to narritive
Choices in life aren't binary
Dialogue options don't need to be either
Despite choices, there's a safety net in knowing that
even the evil choices leads in basically the same direction
honor, violence, patience, empathy, etc
That way, dialogue could be more natural without clearly leading into one of two sides of a spectrum.
Each player sees this option,
so the situation is never
garunteed.
Interaction and Narrative
Mateas & Stearns' reading details the
interaction between the author and audience when it comes to expository storytelling.
In this situation, each player is the author
and audience in turn, so the conversation flows very naturally.
Each player interprets the motivations and risk posed by the other player dynamically.
Full transcript