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How was slavery abolished?

KS3 Y9 Transatlantic Slave Trade
by

David Rawlings

on 18 November 2015

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Transcript of How was slavery abolished?

'Am I Not a Man and a Brother?'
The Slave Trade

Am I not a man and a brother?
MOD
"The main message of the source is... "
Finished
Own Knowledge
Look at all details in the source.
Think about who it is FOR or AGAINST.
This will help you to identify the
message
it is trying to make.
Details from the source
Take 2 minutes to identify the message
Message
Identify the message.
What do you know that supports this message?
Think about:
The characters involved;
The date of the source.
Who created it.
What details in the source also support your message?
Be OBSERVANT!
Look at every detail and read the caption if there is one.
Well done!
You're now an expert at evaluating sources!
Now practice, practice, practice!
[7 marks]
What is the message of this source?
Number of slaves used to build the Pyramids.
Slaves in the world today.
total number transported during the Transatlantic slave trade.
Number of slaves in Ancient Rome.
Slaves in medieval India.
16 million
11 million
1 million
250,000
50,000
Can you match the number of slaves to the historical era:
How do these images make you feel?
Back of books!
Learning Objectives:

K: How slavery has changed throughout history.
U: How to analyse historical sources for their message.
S: MOD - source skills.
Bronze: Can identify forms of slavery from a source.
Silver: Can identify the message of a source.
Gold: Can explain the message of a source using their own knowledge.

What is the message of this source?
M - identify the message
O - explain using own knowledge
D - explain using details from the source
What is the message of this source?
M - identify the message
O - explain using own knowledge
D - explain using details from the source
Source Skills!
Amnesty International, 2011
Plaque created by Josiah Wedgwood, 1793
Review:

How well have you analysed the sources?

Swap your book with the person next to you.
With 3 colours, highlight the MOD in their answer.

i.e. one colour for Message, one for Own Knowldege, etc...
Final Thought:

If we can see that it is wrong, how do humans justify slavery?
Impact of African
culture in America
The Slave Triangle
Capture of slaves
Conditions on the
Middle
Passage
Africa before slavery
The Start of The Atlantic Slave Trade
Auction and the
treatment
of slaves
TASK: Create a mind-map on the Slave trade, while you watch the video.
Your task today is to write a 1 minute speech in favour of the abolition of slavery.

Success Criteria:
Keep it simple:
has the speaker made a clear and simple speech?
Repeat:
has the speaker used repetition to reinforce the big idea?
Performance:
Was there passion, humour?



Watch these speeches and write down 3 good points about each.
Peer-assessment:

Peer-assess these speeches.
WWW and EBI!
Can a speech change the world?
Learning Objectives:

K: Reasons for the abolition of slavery.
U: How to write a persuasive speech.
Bronze: Can describe reasons to abolish slavery;
Silver: Can explain a number of reasons for why slavery should be abolished;
Gold: Can convince an audience to abolish slavery.
Can a speech change the world?
What is abolition?
Thinking point:

What makes a good speech?

Write down 3 criteria for a good speech in the back of your book.
Why was slavery abolished?
Did Martin Luther-King Jr meet your criteria for a good speech?
What would make it better?
You have been allocated groups of 3 and given guidelines on how to prepare your speech.
TASK:
Write a persuasive argument in favour of the abolition of slavery.

Success criteria:
Designate speech roles in your group;
Follow the 5 steps to a great speech;
Take ideas from speeches you have seen;
Your speech should be 8 minutes long;
You have 20 minutes of this lesson to prepare your speeches.
Clear points: did the speakers made a clear and simple speech with three key points?

Evidence: did the speakers use historical evidence to reinforce the big idea?

Performance: was there passion, humour, confidence?
Peer Assessment
Score each speech out of 5 for the following:
THINK / PAIR / SHARE
Why was slavery abolished?
Come up with three reasons in the back of your book.
Share your reasons with the person next to you.
Can you judge the most important reason?
As you watch the speeches, judge them for:
Opening
Organisation of ideas
Content
Connection with audience
Owning the room
Peer-Assess our Speeches
What was good about your speech?
What would you improve next time?
Which speech was the best?
Evaluation
Title: Why was slavery abolished?
Answers these questions in full sentences:
Legacy of Slavery
Learning Objectives:

K:
The legacy (consequences) of slavery.
U:
The nature of the legacy of slavery - was it positive or negative?
S:
Historical judgement; cause & consequence
Bronze:
Can describe the legacy of slavery;
Silver:
Can explain the legacy with reference to positive and negative outcomes;
Gold:
Can make a judgement on the legacy of slavery, assessing the extent to which outcomes have been positive or negative.
L4
L5
L6
"Ultimately, more good came out of slavery than bad." Do you agree?
Enquiry Question
Conclusion
Question: "Ultimately, more good than bad came out of slavery." Do you agree?
You start with an
introduction
(the top bun).
Here you set out what you’ll say in your essay and make a judgement on the question.

Success criteria:
Try to make a
substantiated judgement
-
one that takes both sides of the argument into account.
Include the question in your answer.
Define any terms in the question - what do we mean by legacy?
Introduction
Writing a History essay is a bit like eating a burger, and we’ve all eaten a burger before…
The best bit is the burger so this is our main point.
'On the one hand...'

Success criteria:
Make a clear point
E.g. 'there have been many positive consequences of slavery...'
Use historical evidence to explain your point
E.g. 'such as the spreading of African culture across the world...'
H
A
M
B
U
R
G
E
R
E.g. Despite segregation, poverty and discrimination there have been some cultural positives from slavery. However, for the most part the legacy of slavery has been overwhelmingly negative.
Now for the other side of the question.
'On the other hand...'

Success criteria:
Make a clear point
E.g. 'there have been many positive consequences of slavery...'
Use historical evidence to explain your point
E.g. 'such as the spreading of African culture across the world...'
Final Thought:
Taking into account the positive and negative outcomes of slavery...
Should we apologise for slavery?
GCSE Mark Scheme
L1 - have explained either negative
or
positive consequences of slavery.
[2-4 marks]
L2

- explained negative
and
positive consequences of slavery.
[5-6 marks]
L3 - have done the above and made a
judgement
on the question.
[7-8 marks]
L4 -
substantiated judgement
that takes both negative and positive into account.
[9-10 marks]
Swap books with your partner.
Highlight in 3 different colours: 'judgement'/'one hand'/'other hand'
Give them a mark out of 10, using the GCSE mark scheme.
Add WWW and EBI feedback.
True or False
Back of books
Bridge Activity
1. Slavery was abolished in 1607.
2. Male children less than 15 years of age made up around 20% of the Africans transported to the Americas.
3. The middle passage could take anything from four weeks to over two months depending on weather, ship size and route.
4. Slaves could not legally marry, own property or vote.
5. Slaves could keep their traditional names.
6. America was the largest producer of rice in the 19th century.
7. Only black Africans were used as slaves.
8. 11 million Africans were transported to the Americas.
Options for speeches:

'Should we apologise for slavery?'
'More good than bad came out of slavery?'

Or another title of your choice, as long as it is a controversial issue and about slavery.
Anagrams Game!
Rearrange the letters to solve this anagram.
How many words can you make using these letters?
20 points for the most!
20 points for the longest word!
Revel At Deaths
Platinum: Can assess the message of an historical source, explaining their views using both own knowledge and details from the source.
How could slavers justify the slave trade?
How does this make you feel?
Speedy Read-y Gonzales
Task: Read the three sources as quickly as you can to answer these questions.
1. Who wrote source 2?
2. Who would the writer in source 3 enslave?
3. How did the writer in source 1 justify slavery?
4. How did the writer in source 2 justify slavery?
5. How did the writer in source 3 justify slavery?
Task 2: 150 word challenge
Write a paragraph as a slave trader, explain why you can justify your actions.
Bronze
: identify reasons why the slave traders could justify their actions.
Silver
: explain reasons why the slave traders justified their actions.
Gold
: make a judgement on how valid the slave traders' justifications were.
Learning Objectives:

Empathise with both the slaves and slave traders.
Bronze
: identify reasons why the slave traders could justify their actions.
Silver
: explain reasons why the slave traders justified their actions.
Gold
: make a judgement on how valid the slave traders' justifications were.
Platinum
: can use wider historical context to help evaluate the actions of slave traders.
How Bad was Life for Slaves?
Proposed changes to the school day:
6am - school starts
6.30-12.30am - lessons
12.30-1.30pm - lunch
1.30pm-6.30pm - lessons
What do you think?
Title: How Bad was Life as a Slave?
Task:
Add the cards to show god and bad things about life as a slave.
Good things
Bad things
Opinion Line: How bad was life as a slave?
BAD
GOOD
Learning Objectives:

Develop a two-sided answer to a question.
Bronze
: identify good and bad aspects of life for slaves.
Silver
: ... and give a two-sided answer to a question.
Gold
: ... and make a judgement on how bad life was.
Platinum
: ... assess the criteria of the question - how do we define a bad life?
Task: Now write a two-sided paragraph to explain your opinion.
Bronze
: identify good and bad aspects of life for slaves.
Silver
: ... and give a two-sided answer to a question.
Gold
: ... and make an overall judgement on how bad life was.
Platinum
: ... assess the criteria of the question - how do we define a bad life?
E.g. 'On the one hand life was bad because...'
'On the other hand it was good because...'
'Overall life was very hard for slaves, although there were a small number of benefits.'
Platinum: Use wider historical context to support judgements on why slavery should be abolished.
Platinum
: Critically evaluate the validity of a range of judgements on the legacy of slavery.
Finish with your judgement (opinion) on the question!

Success criteria:
Define any terms in the question - what do we mean by legacy?
Include the question in your answer.
Try to make a
substantiated judgement
-
one that takes both sides of the argument into account.
E.g. Despite segregation, poverty and discrimination there have been some cultural positives from slavery. However, for the most part the legacy of slavery has been overwhelmingly negative.
L7
Full transcript