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Mount Vesuvius

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by

Madison Hawk

on 6 March 2014

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Transcript of Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius is a volcano in Italy that has had 8 major eruptions in the past 17,000 years. The cities that have been most harshly effected by Mount Vesuvius are Pompeii, Naples, and Herculaneum. Mount Vesuvius is created by the convergent continental-continental boundary of the African Plate and the Eurasian Plate. The type of bedrock that makes up the volcano is called tephrite, which is basaltic nd contains a variety of rocks including nepheline. This bedrock type results in the antesitic lava of Mount Vesuvius that leads to highly violent explosions.
Bedrock and Soil Types
The type of bedrock that makes up the volcano is called tephrite, which is basaltic nd contains a variety of rocks including nepheline. This bedrock type results in the antesitic lava of Mount Vesuvius that leads to highly violent explosions. The soil around the volcano is rich and fertile as a result of the the explosions and the tephra, which is composed of fragments of volcanic rock, which has been worn down over time by weather.
Pompeii 79 AD
The city of Pompeii, as well as neighboring cities Herculaneum and Naples, frequently experienced seismic activity. As a result of these frequent earthquakes, there was no alarm among the people of these cities when an earthquake occurred beneath Mount Vesuvius in August of 79 AD. The citizens of Pompeii were unprepared for the explosion that occurred shortly after that was observed by Pliny. The people fled to their homes or for other forms of shelter. The ash cloud covered the sun and fell from the sky at a rate of 6 inches per hour. The resulting pyroclastic flood reached 20 ft in height. Herculaneum soon experienced similar effects. The following day, the city of Pompeii was engulfed in clouds of volcanic gas. The citizens of Pompeii were mostly killed instantly because of the extremely heated gas. The area was never recovered and serves as a tourist attraction.
Pompeii
Environmental Effects
The geosphere was affected by the tephra deposits left by the volcanic ash and lava flows. These left extremely fertile soil that led to agricultural prosperity in the areas surrounding the volcano. All the pyroclastic material and ash that resulted from the explosion would have completely ruined any nearby water source, making them unsafe. The atmosphere then contains many volcanic gasses including laze plumes (Hydrochloric acid and seawater) and HF (Hydrogen Fluoride). The biosphere in the surrounding areas was destroyed and almost every living creature would have perished as a result of these events. The animals and people were preserved in the pyrclastic material in the positions they were in as they perished.
Human Effects
There were 10,000 to 20,000 deaths as a result of the explosion in 79 AD. This area no longer supports residents, all the civilians were wiped out and the city of Pompeii serves as an attraction for tourists. Citizens in cities surrounding Mount Vesuvius, who were spared its devastation relocated to less dangerous zones in order to avoid the destruction that occurred in Pompeii. Since this time, there have been no known inhabitants of the area that was most harshly effected by Mount Vesuvius, but there is evidence shown in the age of rocks that leads scientists to believe their may have been other eruptions that were not observed or recorded.
Mount Vesuvius in the Media
National Geographic Video
http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/photography/behind-the-shot/vesuvius-mazzatenta/
Webpage about Mount Vesuvius
http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/volcanoes/vmtvesuvius.html
Multiple movies have also been made about Mount Vesuvius
Pompeii (2014)
Pompeii: The Last Day (2003)
Bibliography
Digital image. Exploring the Environment: Volcanoes. CET, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://www.cotf.edu/ete/images/modules/volcanoes/pompeii2.GIF>.

Martini, Kirk. Digital image. Volcanic Phenomena in Pompeii. N.p., 10 July 1997. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://www.arch.virginia.edu/struct/pompeii/images/full/dobran-simul.jpeg>.

"Mount Vesuvius - Italy." Mount Vesuvius, Italy: Map, Facts, Eruption Pictures, Pompeii. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2014. <http://geology.com/volcanoes/vesuvius/>.

"Mt. Vesuvius." Mt. Vesuvius. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://www.oocities.org/vesuvius79ad/>.

N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http:/volcanology.geol.ucsb.edu/soil.htm>.

Bagley, Mary. "Mount Vesuvius & Pompeii: Facts & History." LiveScience. TechMedia Network, 13 Mar. 2013. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://www.livescience.com/27871-mount-vesuvius-pompeii.html>.

"Volcanic Gases and Their Effects." Volcanic Gases and Their Effects. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hazards/gas/>.

"Eruption of Mount Vesuvius Begins." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014. <http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/eruption-of-mount-vesuvius-begins>.

"A Point of View: Pompeii's Not-so-ancient Roman Remains." BBC News. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-20407286>.

"Welcome." Smithsonian Institution. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.volcano.si.edu/>.
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