Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Team 2 Learning Styles

No description
by

Tarryn Nester

on 10 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Team 2 Learning Styles

Verbal learning is characterised by an individual who gains further from a linguistic mode of learning. Verbal learners learn most through speaking, listening and viewing information. Verbal learners prefer to read and write information, use expressive language and memorize finer points such as dates and times (Pritchard, 2013).
Verbal learning is characterised by an individual who gains further from a linguistic mode of learning. Verbal learners learn most through speaking, listening and viewing information. Verbal learners prefer to read and write information, use expressive language and memorize finer points such as dates and times (Pritchard, 2013).
Griggs and Dunn advise that learning styles should not be assigned to a cultural group as many differences exist between individuals in a group (1989). However learning styles can arise from a combination of environment and upbringing, students from oral based traditions may respond well to a verbal learning style.
Fleming's Visual, Auditory, Kinaesthetic (VAK) model of learning style recognises student different approaches to learning. Some students have a dominant learning style, whilst others prefer a blend of the three. In 1987 Fleming devised a tool to help students identified their preferred learning styles.
The visual, aural and kinaesthetic or VAK concept was originally spawned in the 1920’s by psychology and education scholars, Montessori and Keller to name a couple. This approach was developed as these scholars identified that each individual learnt from various approaches (Chapman, 2003).
There is little evidence to suggest a correlation between learning styles and gender. Studies using Herman Witkin’s theory on field (in)dependence suggests males are slightly more likely to be solitary learners than females but without any statistical significance (Severiens & Dam, 1994).
Learning environment design plays an important role online learning. The "shape" of the software can help or hinder the teacher in how they educate. Solitary learners benefit from individual teachings and self-paced learning, technology advancements make this much easier.
Bandura's social learning theory is based on one person learning from another person via observation, imitation and modelling. This theory is often called a bridge between behaviourist and cognitive learning theories because it encompasses attention, memory and motivation.
Social learning styles are more common in some cultures more than others. Studies have shown that some cultural elements increase the likelihood of a social learning style. For example, China’s government structure influences teaching and learning styles (Heffernan, 2010).
Social learners thrive in a classroom setting and maximise their potential when studying within a group. Classrooms today have benefitted from advances in technology and informed teachers harness these resources including online resources and smart devices available to them.
Description
Verbal learning is characterised by an individual who gains most from a linguistic mode of learning. Verbal learners learn most through speaking, listening and viewing information. Verbal learners prefer to read and write information, use expressive language and memorize facts (Pritchard, 2013).
Culture
Griggs and Dunn advise that learning styles should not be assigned to a cultural group as many differences exist between individuals in a group (1989). However learning styles can arise from a combination of environment and upbringing, students from oral based traditions may respond well to a verbal learning style.
Technology
Multimedia is used in curricula now more than ever and this can have a negative emotional effect on learners that preference the verbal learning style. These negative emotions can have a significant impact on learning performance (Chen & Sun 2012).

Description
Fleming's Visual, Auditory, Kinaesthetic (VAK) model of learning style recognises different approaches to learning. Some students have a dominant learning style, whilst others prefer a blend of the three. In 1987 Fleming devised a tool to help students identified their preferred learning styles.

Gender
There is minimal information available that considers significant learning style differences based on gender. The results from a study by Bidabadi and Yamat (2010) showed no noteworthy differences between male and female learning style preferences.

History
The VAK concept was originally spawned in the 1920’s by psychology and education scholars, Montessori and Keller to name a couple. This approach was developed as these scholars identified that each individual learnt from various approaches (Chapman, 2003).

Researchers have found that no single learning style exists within any one culture; each culture encompasses multiple learning styles (Dunn & Griggs, 1990).Therefore I conclude that VAK learning style comes down to the individuals needs not the culture.
Culture
Gender
There is little evidence to suggest a correlation between learning styles and gender. Studies using Herman Witkin’s theory on field (in)dependence suggests males are slightly more likely to be solitary learners than females but without any statistical significance (Severiens & Dam, 1994).

Technology

Learning environment design plays an important role in online learning. The "shape" of the software can help or hinder how the teacher educates. Solitary learners benefit from individual teachings and self-paced learning, technology advancements make this much easier (Learning Theories, 2015).

Description
Bandura's social learning theory is based on one person learning from another person via observation, imitation and modelling (1971). This theory is often called a bridge between behaviourist and cognitive learning theories because it encompasses attention, memory and motivation.

History/Evolution
Research is dated back to Aristotle the Greek philosopher who was fascinated by imitation and believed humans to be the most imitative of living beings (Butcher 1922). Research has continued with opposing theories on imitative learning.

Culture
Social learning styles are more common in some cultures more than others. Studies have shown that some cultural elements increase the likelihood of a social learning style. For example, China’s government structure influences teaching and learning styles (Heffernan, 2010).

Technology
Social learners thrive in a classroom setting and maximise their potential when studying within a group. Classrooms today have benefitted from advances in technology and informed teachers harness these resources including online resources and smart devices available to them.

Gender
Studies comparing gender in learners have rarely been able to differentiate between gender differences and environmental influences (Santrock 2006). We are conditioned from birth by influences filled with gender stereotypes. Researchers continue to investigate whether gender directly and singularly affects the preferred learning style.

Technology

Logical style learning students have a lower level of academic achievement in an online learning environment in comparison to other learning styles. Technology can assist logical learning when using instructional media and logic games and puzzles (Alper, 2004).

History
Information about early identification of the solitary learning style is scarce. However Honey and Mumford (1982) defined four types of learners. This included, Reflectors, these learners are similar to solitary learners in that they learn from observing others, prefer to take a back seat in meetings and consider all the possibilities before making a decision.
Technology
Independent studies found VAK style learners to prefer technology based learning. This is especially seen in both group and individual styles where, "Students learn best by 'seeing' value and importance of information presented". This is partially due to gender, geographical and cultural differences (Gilakjani, 2012).

Gender
Learning styles of a social, solitary and logical manner in Gender have long been theorized and numerous studies contributed to 'ultimately indeterminate' results of learning styles in comparison. The studies mostly involve dependent, independent, competitive, collaborative, avoidant and participative models. (Halili, 1996)
Culture

Variety in logical, learning styles and teaching styles would avoid monotonous learning, also factoring in psychological and motivational differences (Gilakjani, 2012). An un-functional learning environment can cause learning and behavioural thinking problems. This can affect natural learning and lateral thinking and should influence variances in logical teaching models (Tollefson, 2011).

Description
Logical learners are described as being good at maths and problem solving. They use reasoning, numbers and patterns and look at the relationships between information, they then start to work things out and through this process they learn (Pritchard 2013).
Culture

Culture plays a significant role in socialisation and therefore, is thought to influence the learning style of a cultural group (Simy & Kolb). However, there is no research with large sample sizes to support that any one culture produces more Solitary learners.
References
Learning styles describe the way in which we optimally learn. Whether it be by listening, speaking, doing or a combination of the modalities, an awareness of the ideal environment for us to engage in learning experiences is important to our success as learners.

Learning Styles

Whether we are teaching or learning we can benefit from understanding the preferred learning style of our students and/or ourselves. Creating an environment which caters for a group of students with a variety of learning styles, or creating an optimum experiences for ourselves as adult learners can be informed by this study
Conculsion
Alper, Y. G. A. (2004). Learning Preferences and Learning Styles of Online Adult Learners. International Education Journal, 4(4), (270-275).

Bidabadi, F. SH. & Yamat, H. (2010). Learning style preferences by Iranian EFL freshman university students. Procedia Social and Behavioural Sciences, 7, (219-226). DOI:10.1016/j.sbspro.2010.10.031

Butcher, S.H. (1922). The Poetics of Aristotle 4th ed. London, Macmillan.

Bundura, A. (1971). Social Learning Theory.
General Learning Corporation
. Retreived From http://www.esludwig.com/uploads/2/6/1/0/26105457/bandura_sociallearningtheory.pdf

Chapman, A. (2003). Howard Gardner multiple intelligences. Retrieved August 12, 2015 from http://www.businessballs.com/howardgardnermultipleintelligences.htm.

Chen, C.-M., & Sun, Y.-C. (2012). Assessing the effects of different multimedia materials on emotions and learning performance for visual and verbal style learners. Computers & Education, 59(4), 1273-1285. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.006

Gilakjani, A.(2012). Visual/Auditory, Kinaesthetic Learning Styles and their impact on English Language Teaching, Journal of Studies in Education, Vol. 2, No. 1, Retrieved August 13, 2015 from http://dx.doi.org/10.5296/jse.v2il.1007,

Griggs, S. A., and R. Dunn. (1989). The Learning Styles of Multicultural Groups and Counselling Implications. Journal of Multicultural Counselling and Development 17, (146–155). DOI: 10.1002/j.2161-1912.1989.tb00427.x

Halili, Siti Hajar ; Naimie, Zahra ; Siraj, Saedah ; AhmedAbuzaid, Rana ; Leng, Chin Hai. (2014). Learning Styles and Gender Differences of USM Distance Learners, School of Distance Education, Malaysia, Social and Behavioural Sciences, Vol 141, (1369 – 1372). Retreived,13 August 2015 from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042814036672

Heffernan, T., Morrison, M., Basu, P., & Sweeney, A. (2010). Cultural differences, learning styles and transnational education. Journal Of Higher Education Policy & Management, 32(1), (27-39). DOI:10.1080/13600800903440535

Honey, P. & Mumford, A. (1982) Manual of Learning Styles London: P Honey
Pritchard, A. (2013). Ways of learning: Learning theories and learning styles in the classroom (46-65). DOI:10.4324/9781315852089.

Santrock, JW. (2006). Life span development, 10th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill. Retrieved August 15 2015 from www.jblearning.com/samples/0763751375/46436_ch08_000_000.pdf

Severiens, S., & Dam, G. (n.d.)(1994). Gender differences in learning styles: A narrative review and quantitative meta-analysis. Higher Education, 27, (487-501). DOI:10.1007/bf01384906

Simy & Kolb. (2008). Are There Cultural Differences in Learning Style. Retrieved from https://weatherhead.case.edu/departments/organizational-behavior/workingPapers/WP-07-01.pdf

Social Learning Theory (2015), Learning Theories. Retrieved August 16, 2015 from url:http://www.learning-theories.com/social-learning-theory-bandura.html

Tollefson, Joanne (2012). Clinical Psychomotor Skills : Assessment Tools for Nursing Students. Retrieved from http://www.eblib.com

Music By
Bensound.com Ukulele
http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music?download=ukulele

Images retreived from
http://www.howdesign.com/parse/understanding-end-users-and-metacognition/
http://www.consciousness-evolving.com/Interpersonal_Intelligence.html

http://www.consciousness-evolving.com/Intrapersonal_Intelligence.html

Gender
Studies show that females generally acquire language skills earlier than their male counterparts. Reasearch also indicates that males are more susceptible to language impairments such as dyslexia which can affect the verbal mode of learning (Learning Theories, 2015).
Full transcript