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Lenz's Law

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by

Crystal Dauwe

on 4 December 2014

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Transcript of Lenz's Law

Lenz's Law is when an electric current is forced into a conductor. In this case the pipe is the conductor and the electric current is moving around inside the pipe.
A Magnet In a Copper Pipe
Crystal Dauwe
.
What is Lenz's
Law?
"The induced magnetic field always opposes the change in the original magnetic flux."- Heinrich Lenz
Expressed in an equation Len'z law looks like this:
This shows that the induced force from the electromagnetism (ℰ) and the change in magnetic flux (∂ΦB) have opposite signs as illustrated in the picture below.
Diagrams
Lenz was also known for independently discovering Joules Law in 1842
Lenz's Law was founded by the German Physicist Heinrich F. E. Lenz in 1833

So basically if you move the magnet towards the copper or aluminum it will push the magnet away, and if you pull the magnet away from the copper or aluminum it will pull the magnet towards itself.
Lenz's Law is typically demonstrated with copper or aluminum pipes.
These metals are non-magnetic and when a magnet is stationary near these metals nothing significant occurs. That is until motion is added to the equation.
The higher the speed between the magnets and pipe, the more resistance occurs until the resistance and gravity are equal in which case the magnet moves through the pipe at a constant speed with no acceleration.
The steps that the magnet goes through when going down the copper pipe include: Free fall, deceleration, constant speed, and then free fall once again as the magnet exits the pipe.
Lenz's Law is when an electric current is forced into a conductor. In this case the pipe is the conductor and the electric current is moving around inside the pipe.
Jacob Eckerman
Lenz's Law
Full transcript