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Poetry for Freshpeople

Miss Game's class
by

Ellie Game

on 27 February 2013

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Transcript of Poetry for Freshpeople

by Ellie Game Poetry Poetic Structures Major Poetry Groups Elements of Poetry Figurative Language Figures of Sound Poetic Forms Examples Do you remember what a couplet is?
Click the next button to find out. Lyric comes from the greek word "lyre" meaning musical instrument. When we see lyrics we think of music so it helps to make that connection. The majority of poems are under the lyric category. Theme: a central message or insight revealed--a generalization about people or life--direct or implied

Ex: What was the theme of "Out, Out"?

Universal Theme: message about life tha can be understood by most people.

*Make a list of at least 2 universal themes.

Tone: the writer's attitude toward the audience and subject (informal or formal) *Remember when we were talking about tone, I had said an example of how your tone changes when you talk to different people. You may have a more formal tone when you talk to the principal and you definitely talk more informal with your friends.
Mood: the feeling created in the reader by the work

Speaker: who is speaking, point of view Rhyme: the repetition of sounds at the ends of words We have looked at hyperbole before. Here's an example and you can write your definition:
Ex: By the look of the moldy broken porch, this house must be over a thousand years old.
Metaphor: direct comparison between 2 unlike things
Simile: indirect comparison between 2 unlike things, uses the words "like" or "as"
Symbol: anything that stands for (or represents) something else. Sonnet: 14 line lyric poem, usually written in
iambic pentameter
Haiku: a 3 line poem, 1st & 3rd line consist of 5 syllables, the 2nd line contains 7. They convey a single emotion/image of nature.
Ballad: a poem narrating a story in short stanzas
Epic: long, narrative poetry about the deeds of heroes and gods
Catalogue: a list of things
Limerick: humorous poem, consists of 5 lines and rhyme scheme of AABBA.
Lines 1,2,5=7-10 syllables
Lines 3, 4 =5-7 syllables
Acrostic: a poem in which certain letters in each line form a word or words. Haiku Poetry Study Guide For this activity we will be using your Poetry study guide and we will go through each section and look at examples of each. We will start with couplet since you have had verse and stanza with Ms. Finnerty. Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee. The couplet in this poem is the last two lines. Couplet: two lines joined by rhyme *Remember a couplet isn't just part of a sonnet and shows up at the end, it is seen in many poems with the last words rhyming in sequence. Quatrain: a stanza consisting of 4 lines Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee. *When I think of a quatrain, I think of a quarter which is another way of saying 1/4. Even though the sonnet doesn't have distinguishable stanzas, it is identified as having 3 quatrains and a couplet. Lyric: an emotional or subjective response to an experience. I've got sunshine on a cloudy day.
When it's cold outside I've got the month of May.
I guess you'd say
What can make me feel this way?
My girl
Talkin' 'bout my girl

I've got so much honey the bees envy me.
I've got a sweeter song than the birds in the trees.
I guess you'd say
What can make me feel this way?
My girl
Talkin' 'bout my girl Does the lyric look familiar? It's My Girl by the Temptations. A lot of times music and its lyrics are considered poetry. Lyric poems are also considered to be mostly in first person. Dramatic is already filled out in your
study guide. This is a tough category but
you can look at Shakespeare's plays sometimes
as an example. A dramatic poem is usually speech through a different character rather than the author himself/herself speaking. My Last Duchess by Robert Browning (one of my favorite poems)

That's my last Duchess painted on the wall,
Looking as if she were alive. I call
That piece a wonder, now: Frà Pandolf's hands
Worked busily a day, and there she stands.
Will't please you sit and look at her? I said
"Frà Pandolf" by design, for never read
Strangers like you that pictured countenance,
The depth and passion of its earnest glance,
But to myselfthey turned (since none puts by
The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)
And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,
How such a glance came there; so, not the first
Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, 'twas not
Her husband's presence only, called that spot
Of joy into the Duchess' cheek: perhaps
Frà Pandolf chanced to say "Her mantle laps
Over my Lady's wrist too much," or "Paint
Must never hope to reproduce the faint
Half-flush that dies along her throat": such stuff
Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough
For calling up that spot of joy. Ex: Sonnet 60
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.

*This first quatrain of Sonnet 60, we have the rhyme scheme ABAB. Shore and before rhyme, end and contend rhyme. Rhythm: the pattern of beats, or stresses in spoken language (some poems use specific pattern, meter, others do not) Ex: Sonnet 60
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.

*This first quatrain of Sonnet 60 is in iambic pentameter which is a type of rhythm that Shakespearean sonnets have. In this case, iambic pentameter is 5 pairs of unstressed and stressed syllables=10 syllables per line. Assonance: repetition of vowel sounds followed by different consonants
Consonance: the repetition of the final consonant vowel
Onomatopoeia: the use of words that imitate sounds. Examples Assonance:
1. he silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
2. I must confess that in my quest I felt depressed and restless
Consonance:
1.Whose woods these are I think I know (Frost)
Onomatopoeia:
Ex: click, buzz
*List 3 more examples Examples Metaphor: "All the world's a stage"
Explain this metaphor, what is the comparison?
Simile: you smell as sweet as a rose
Explain this simile and what the comparison is.
Symbol: “Ah Sunflower, weary of time, Who countest the steps of the sun; Seeking after that sweet golden clime Where the traveler’s journey is done;” (Blake)

-Here the sunflower symbolizes mankind and his/her wish to be immortal.
-Can you think of a symbol in Romeo and Juliet? By Basho Matsuo

An old silent pond...
A frog jumps into the pond,
splash! Silence again. Ballad From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)

It is an ancient Mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.
"By thy long gray beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

The Bridegroom’s doors are opened wide,
And I am next of kin;
The guests are met, the feast is set:
May'st hear the merry din."

He holds him with his skinny hand,
"There was a ship," quoth he.
"Hold off! Unhand me, gray-beard loon!"
Eftsoons his hand dropt he.

He holds him with his glittering eye–
The Wedding-Guest stood still,
And listens like a three years’ child:
The Mariner hath his will.

The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone:
He cannot choose but hear;
And thus spake on that ancient man,
The bright-eyed Mariner.

The ship was cheered, the harbor cleared,
Merrily did we drop
Below the kirk, below the hill,
Below the lighthouse top. Epic Since an epic is very long, there is no way for me to put an example in this little circle. But some examples would be:

1. The Odyssey by Homer
2. The Iliad by Homer
3. Beowulf by unknown Catalogue Summer fading
Leaves dying
Wind colder
Jackets worn

Temperature low
Plants die
Green to brown
Air cold Limerick There was an Old Man in a boat,
Who said, 'I'm afloat, I'm afloat!'
When they said, 'No! you ain't!'
He was ready to faint,
That unhappy Old Man in a boat.

by Edward Lear Acrostic Belong in a cave
Always during the day but
Till night comes, you will
See them hunting around


Goofy
Amicable
Mature
Eccentric The Lamb—by William Blake


Little Lamb who made thee
Dost thou know who made thee
Gave thee life & bid thee feed.
By the stream & o'er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing wooly bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice!
Little Lamb who made thee
Dost thou know who made thee

Little Lamb I'll tell thee,
Little Lamb I'll tell thee!
He is called by thy name,
For he calls himself a Lamb:
He is meek & he is mild,
He became a little child:
I a child & thou a lamb,
We are called by his name.
Little Lamb God bless thee.
Little Lamb God bless thee. 1. Any stanzas? couplets?
2. Major Poetry group
3. Elements of poetry
4. Figures of sound
5. Figurative Language
6. Form
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