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Social Stratification

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kim tendido

on 16 September 2012

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Transcript of Social Stratification

SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Titanic 1912 Social Classes Social stratification in a society may be defined as its internal division into a hierarchy of distinct social groups, each having specific life chances, and a distinctive styles of life.

Social stratification refers to a system by which a society ranks categories of people in a hierarchy (high, middle, or low).

Social Differentiation and Social Inequality Four Basic Concepts of Social Stratification Social stratification is a trait of society, not simply a reflection of individual differences;
Social stratification carries over from generation to generation;
Social stratification is universal but variable;
Social stratification involves not just inequality but beliefs as well. Karl Marx Capitalism
In the capitalist system, the ruling classes own the means of production, which essentially includes the working class itself as they only have their own labor power ('wage labor') to offer in order to survive.
Work hard to earn more.
Later would create communism. Karl Marx Max Weber Weber’s Stratification Hierarchy: Class: A person's economic position in a society, based on birth and individual achievement.
Status: A person's prestige, social honor, or popularity in a society.
Power: A person's ability to get their way despite the resistance of others. Why does SoCial Stratification exist?
Wealth: includes property such as buildings, lands, farms, houses, factories and as well as other assets Wealth, Prestige, and Power
Prestige: the respect with which a person or status position is regarded by others Wealth, Prestige, and Power
Power: the ability of people or groups to achieve their goals despite opposition from others Wealth, Prestige, and Power 3 Characteristics of a Stratified System Example: The way we rank people differently by race, gender, and social class. The rankings apply to social categories of people who share a common characteristic without necessarily interacting or identifying with each other. People’s life experiences and opportunities depend on their social category. Ex. The greater the advantage had by the son or daughter coming from an upper-class family to have a successful life than a child of a minimum-wage farmer, because the upper-class family has a greater amount of resources than the farmer. The ranks of different social categories change slowly over time. Social Class
Social Status
Social Role Basic Components of Social Stratification refers to a group of people with similar levels of wealth, influence, and status Social Class Social standing of a person within a social class. Social Status Expected behavior patterns that correspond with a status
Superiority
Equal Standing
Inferiority Role Upper Class
Middle Class
Lower Class Social Class in the Philippines Very Rich
Elite Family

2 types of Upper class
* new
* traditional upper class

3 division:
1. upper upper
2. Lower upper
3. Upper Middle Upper class Known as the sandwich class
White collar workers
Education is the main indicator of social status

2 levels of Middle class
Lower middle class
Upper middle class Middle Class Farm workers, unskilled artisans, service workers, underemployed and indigent of families

Division of lower Class
1. upper Lower
2. Lower Lower Lower Class SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES Criteria
Patron – Client relationship
Wealth
Education
Physical Appearance SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES (criteria) Patron – Client relationship SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES (criteria) Wealth SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES (criteria) Education SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES (criteria) Physical Appearance SOCIAL STRATIFICATION IN THE PHILIPPINES (criteria)




JAIME ZOBEL DE AYALA AND FAMILY





HENRY SY AND FAMILY





LUCIO TAN





MANNY VILLAR Social Mobility Parents Occupation

Creates a number and variety
of jobs
Offer more opportunities for mobility Factors Affecting Social Mobility Education
Socio-economic status
Less opportunities for
the low class High Fertility
Early marriages
Lack of family planning Horizontal Social Mobility- prefers
to the movement from one
position to another
with same ranking.


Vertical Social Mobility- which is
the upward and downward
change in rank. Social Mobility Upward
Breakdown under the pressures of striving for success
Feeling of loneliness , frustration and other social disorganization
Loosening of family ties and old frinedships
Departing from former place Consequences on Vertical Social Mobility Downward
Lost of self-confidence
Social isolation
Desperation
Diverse type of emotional, social, and cultural maladjustment STRATIFICATION AND TECHNOLOGY Stratification and technology Social stratification and technology: a global perspective Hunting and Gathering-Horticultural and Pastoral-Agrarian-Industrial-Post Industrial. Gerhard Lenski Industrialization Post Industrial Social stratification gets more complex in societies with more advanced technology. Advanced Technology The Kuznets Curve TECHNOLOGY Technological Advances: Objective Dimensions of Stratification How Social Stratification Is Defined.
Weber's analysis of social stratification was not rooted in or linked to any attempt to formulate a general "historical analysis" of social development. While, in common with Marx, Weber argued that "class stratification" had a clear and important economic dimension, he believed that two other related dimensions of stratification, namely:
a. Status and
b. Party (or political power)
needed to be included if a full analysis and understanding of the rich social variety of different forms of social stratification was to be obtained.
Thus, as has been suggested above, in order to understand the relative significance of Weber's "three dimensions of stratification":
a. Class
b. Status and
c. Party Objective Dimensions of Stratification How Social Stratification Is Defined.
Weber's analysis of social stratification was not rooted in or linked to any attempt to formulate a general "historical analysis" of social development. While, in common with Marx, Weber argued that "class stratification" had a clear and important economic dimension, he believed that two other related dimensions of stratification, namely:
a. Status and
b. Party (or political power)
needed to be included if a full analysis and understanding of the rich social variety of different forms of social stratification was to be obtained.
Thus, as has been suggested above, in order to understand the relative significance of Weber's "three dimensions of stratification":
a. Class
b. Status and
c. Party The dimensions that govern stratification are economic, political, and social. The economic dimension of stratification is measured based on the distribution of income and wealth of the citizenry in relation with the Gross National Product (GNP) and GNP per capita.
The political dimension of stratification deals with power inequalities. The social dimension refers to the degree of openness of closeness of societies by analyzing the intra and inter-generational mobility and the patterns of changes in status or positions in an individual’s lifetime.
Most difficulties with Social Class arise because it is only applicable to those people who are in paid employment. Therefore it does not apply directly to that part of the population who are not in paid employment (about 33% in 1991). Without an occupation, they cannot be assigned to a Social Class, although as we have seen, in most censuses those who have been in employment will record their most recent occupation on the form. For this reason, the proportion who cannot be assigned to a Social Class in 1991 is only 16%. Problems of social stratification
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