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Sonnet 104

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on 2 May 2015

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Transcript of Sonnet 104

Sonnet 104
Analysis


To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your
eye I eyed
,
Such seems your beauty still.
Three

winters
cold
Have from the forests shook
three

summers
' pride;
Three
beauteous
springs
to yellow
autumn
turned
In process of the seasons have I seen;
Three

April
perfumes in
three
hot
Junes
burned,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
Ah yet doth beauty, like a dial hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived.
  Ere you were born was beauty’s
summer
dead.
  For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred:
Sonnet 104
To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I eyed,
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold
Have from the forests shook three summers' pride;
Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turned
In process of the seasons have I seen;
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burned,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
Ah yet doth beauty, like a dial hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived.
  For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred:
Ere you were born was beauty’s summer dead.
Paraphrase: Quatrain 1
To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I eyed,
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold
Have from the forests shook three summers' pride;
Analysis
- Shakespeare is the speaker.
- He is describing another man's beauty.
- Subgenre: Sonnet
- Iambic Pentameter
- ABAB CDCD EFEF GG
- Tone: Peaceful and Respectful

Analysis: Literary Devices
Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turned
In process of the seasons have I seen;
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burned,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
IOP by Amy Quach
To me, my friend, your beauty will never age. Your beauty is still as beautiful as it was since the first time I saw you.
Paraphrase: Quatrain 2
Throughout all of the seasons since I have first seen you, you are still young and beautiful.
Paraphrase: Quatrain 3
Ah yet doth beauty, like a dial hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived.
Your beauty is like the hands of a clock. Time moves forward, but the actual hands physically do not change. But in reality, my eyes may be deceived because your beauty is really changing.
For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred:
Ere you were born was beauty’s summer dead.

You brought the beauty into the world when you were born, and no other person who will live after us will outshine your beauty.
Paraphrase: The Couplet
Platonic beauty is everlasting.
Thematic Statement
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
D
E
F
E
F
G
G
Three
: the number of years that Shakespeare had been with his lover.

Seasons
: listed in the order of every other third season.
Example:
Winter Spring Summer
Spring Summer Autumn

Month
: listed in the order of every other third month.
Example:
April May June
To me, fair friend,
you
never can be old,
For as
you
were when first
your

eye I eyed
,
Such seems
your
beauty still.
Three

winters

cold
Have from
the forests
shook

three

summers'

pride
;
Three
beauteous
springs
to yellow
autumn

turned
In process of the seasons have I seen;
Three
April perfumes in
three
hot Junes burned,
Since first I saw
you
fresh, which yet are green.
Ah yet doth beauty, like a dial hand,
Steal from his
figure
, and no pace perceived;
So
your

sweet hue
, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived.
  For fear of which, hear this,
thou
age unbred:
Ere
you
were born was beauty’s
summer dead
.
Symbols
"figure"
"sweet hue"
"Winter"
"Summer"
"Springs"
"Autumn"

Diction
:
"cold"
"pride"
"shook"
"turned"
Personification
"the forests shook three summers' pride"
"Steal from his figure"

Alliteration
"eye I eyed"

Repetition
"three"
second person pronouns

Antithesis
:
"summer dead"

Sonnet 104
To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I eyed,
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold
Have from the forests shook three summers' pride;
Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turned
In process of the seasons have I seen;
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burned,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
Ah yet doth beauty, like a dial hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived.
  For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred:
Ere you were born was beauty’s summer dead.
Full transcript