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Maori

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by

Alexis Linhares

on 23 February 2015

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Transcript of Maori


-tattooing a young person of a certain rank
-marriage
-funerals
-the appearance of sacred beings in the sky (the Maori new year)
-opening of the house of learning
-peace agreements
-summoning allies in war

Hakari
Tua – removed “tapu” from babies and ensured health for the child.
Tohi – Followed Tua ceremony, they placed babies in streams and they would be chosen a God,
boys were Tūmatauenga, the god of war, and girls to the goddess Hineteiwaiwa.
Pure – followed Tohi, renew the mana (spirit powers) of the child
Rahui – ceremony honoring a certain place, by placing Tapu on it.
Ta i te kawa – for celebrating the opening of a new house.
Powhiri – a ceremony for welcoming new people into the village

Tua – removed “tapu” from babies and ensured health for the child.
Tohi – Followed Tua ceremony, they placed babies in streams and they would be chosen a God, boys were Tūmatauenga, the god of war, and girls to the goddess Hineteiwaiwa.
Pure – followed Tohi, renew the mana (spirit powers) of the child
Rahui – ceremony honoring a certain place, by placing Tapu on it.
Ta i te kawa – for celebrating the opening of a new house.
Powhiri – a ceremony for welcoming new people into the village

Their Land
Their Life
Their Spirituality
Thank you!
Welcome to New Zealand
Home of the Maori tribe since 1280 CE
BY:
Hunter
Alexis L.
Sabrina
Douglas
Maori
New Zealand
The Maori Today
Their Daily Lives
Their Means of Living
Rituals/Ceremonies
Feasts/Events
Maori Culture Today
Contributions to Society
• New Zealand is filled with many mountains which the maori people believed were once gods of great strength.

• Lake Taupo - the beating heart of the north island according to Maori legend - was formed by volcanic eruption. The lake occupies the ancient crater that's now a playground for water-sports
• The central north island landscape is of deep cultural and spiritual significance to the Maori

• Three active volcanoes, Ruapehu, Tongariro, and Ngauruhoe are considered precious treasures

• 3 rivers Whanganui, Whangaehu and Rangitikei and are known as the spirtual land for the maori

• A marae is a holy place for the Maori that serves religious and social purposes. It consists of an open space that is clear and roughly rectangular

• The marae is considered a tapu place which means something that is considered inviolable or sacrosanct and must be left alone by outsiders

• The marae is still a vital part of their culture even today
Religious Story
-Believe that the god Tane gave mankind three baskets of knowledge, “Nga Kete-o-te-Wananga” containing stories of creations and magic. And believe that Tane is responsible for everything and is in mountains lakes and rivers.

- Wanganui River, Mount Ngaruahoe and Mount Ruapehu are all significant and sacred geographical locations to the Maori

-Most things contain “mana” or some sort of spirit inside of it which is why they can never destroy nature.

-The god Whiro is the god of evil and evokes an evil lizard into a mans body when they need to be punished and eat away his organs.
Pohutukawa tree – a sacred tree hich the Maori believed spirits could drop in and out of this world at.

-Wairua
The spirit of a person, if that person dies then the spirit will live on and will travel to rarohenga (the underworld)



Maori Myths
• There is a maori legend about the mountains that all the 7 mountains around lake taupo were males except one, Pihanga, and all the other mountains were in love with her. The other mountains decided to fight to see who would get her and Tongariro won and said all the other mountains had to move. One of the mountains left a trail of tears behind as he left which is known as the Whanganui River.
Sacred Areas
The Land
Early 20th century housing was mainly poor

They lived in Kainga (villages), in rectangle houses that were made of timber, rushes, tree, ferns, and bark. European settlers influenced the houses and in the late they 1800’s started building the European houses due to concerns of disease spreading because of inadequate housing and other problems.

Many moved after the first or second world war, in 1997 state houses were set up for them, but it was a very different way of living than what they were used too.

It was common for there to be multiple owners of houses.


In 1867, Maori were to donate the land for schools.

Maori children were taught the English language

Maori children were punished for speaking their language.

Secondary education became free in the 1930’s.

School were very strict


Many games were a huge part of what they used for entertainment.

Athletics: sports helped gain strength, endurance, and battle skills. Both men and women participated in sports like wrestling, running, jumping, para wa

Water sports (board riding and board surfing) with canoes and swimming were very popular to the Maori culture because they were all strong swimmers.

Tatai whetu (tongue twisters) that were recited, Tutukai and kurawiniwini guessing games and chants. String and stick games were used to practice coordination.

Maori also made swings and see-saws

Kite flying, tobogganing, puppets, and board games were also very popular.




Maori made their clothes from Native plants, birds, and animal skins such as: seals and Polynesian Dogs.

The certain types of clothes were used to show the persons stature.

The most popular types of clothing are cloaks, and the most important cloaks were worn by chiefs. They were made by material such as Polynesian dog (Kuri skin) and hair. Other cloaks were mad from woven flax fibre. (feathered cloaks were called: Kahu kiwi). Other garments such as rain capes kept the person dry and were made of flax or cabbage tree leaves.

They mainly walked barefoot, but made their own shoes if needed.

Jewellery and head garments were made from stone and bone.


Entertainment
Housing
Schooling
-tattooing a young person of a certain rank

-marriage

-funerals

-the appearance of sacred beings in the sky (the Maori new year)

-opening of the house of learning

-peace agreements

-summoning allies in war


Hakari
Clothing

-Tua – removed “tapu” from babies and ensured health for the child.

-Tohi – Followed Tua ceremony, they placed babies in streams and they would be chosen a God, boys were Tūmatauenga, the god of war, and girls to the goddess Hineteiwaiwa.

-Pure – followed Tohi, renew the mana (spirit powers) of the child

-Rahui – ceremony honoring a certain place, by placing Tapu on it.

-Ta i te kawa – for celebrating the opening of a new house.

-Powhiri – a ceremony for welcoming new people into the village

Work
Hunting
Farming
Crafts
Maori cultural practices continue to thrive in New Zealand and can include:
- Action songs
-Oratory
-Hong
i
, the pressing together of noses in greeting
-The cooking of food on heated stones known as the earth oven
-Carved houses used as an area of ceremony and meeting
Maori would spend free time weaving and woodcarving

They would pass on stories and legends through creating carving and created sculptures and canoes

They believed God created and communicated through the master carvers

They decorate meeting houses with carvings

They wove mats, baskets, skirts, and cloaks

They also painted
Work in Maori villages consisted mostly of farming, hunting, and building

Other occupations included tattoo artists who created the traditional body artwork for the tribes

Also wood workers who created carvings, canoes, and buildings

Generally the men were the hunters and women would work in the homes, weaving and sometimes farming
Rebuilding...
-A once small tribe of people has grown quite large over the past century
- From a population of 45,000 in the 1890s to populating 14% of New Zealand's 4 million inhabitants
-Despite all odds ( European meddling, diseases, tribal infighting), this rich culture continues to build it's worldwide reputation
- Resurrecting Maori's rich art and symbolism
-Maori made an official langugage of New Zealand in 1987

Government
- Since the mid 19th century, Maori people have helped govern the land of New Zealand.
- Out of the 120 seats in parliament, 7 are reserved for Maori
- Any voters who claim to have Maori ancestry can vote in a Maori electoral district
-However, a Maori can register in either a general or a Maori district
Maori Tattoos
-The Maori people are known for their very distinctive Polynesian tattoos(tatau)
-Tattoos consist of spiral and curved shapes
-The most popular place for a Maori tattoo is the face (moko)
-This sacred art form is found around the world
-Since the rival of the Maori culture, tattooing has made a comeback including the old equipment like chisels
-Modern tattoos in the west are usually found on the body, not the face
- Another similar style of tattooing, kirituhi, does not have the same spiritual tie for the Maori
-More acceptable for non-Maori




Movies
-Whale Rider, is a critically acclaimed film and won numerous awards
-Filmed with an all Maori cast
-A nomination at the 2004 Academy awards for best actress in a lead role ( Keisha Castle-Hughes)
-Entirely filmed in New Zealand
-Depicts a 1000 year old Maori Legend
-Since this film's release, indigenous and native films have generated more interest
Sports
- In 1888, the New Zealand native team brought some cultural traditions to the world of Rugby
-Before playing matches in Britain, the player's would perform the haka
-The haka is a traditional ancestry battle cry
-It was used to intimidate the other team
-Today, the "All Blacks" continue to perform the haka before every rugby match continuing this 100 year old tradition
Maori daily life is centered around getting food and the men would spend most of the day hunting

The main source of meat was a large bird called the Moa

Other food sources were other birds, seals, fish, and other seafood

Fish hooks were made from bone, shells, wood, or stone, nets of flax were also used, and barbed spears were used to hunt birds
Planting and tending crops in the communal gardens was another part of Maori daily life

common crops included sweet potatoes, yams, wheat, rice, and peas

In the late 1700s domestic animals such as pigs were introduced to the farm life

Traditionally digging and grubbing tools were used for farming, but in the 1800s the plough was introduced allowing for more efficient farming
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