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The Leisure Diagnostic Battery

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Tommy Means

on 21 April 2014

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Transcript of The Leisure Diagnostic Battery

Perceived Freedom in Leisure
The Leisure Diagnostic Battery
Source & Cost
Venture Publishing, Inc : 1999 Cato Ave State College, PA 16801
Phone 814-234-4561 : Fax 814-234-1651

$195.00

Is available via Computer Software
Construct
Reliability & Validity
Suggested References
How to Score
Long Form Version A
3 point Likert scale (All of section 1, Barriers to Leisure (G) in Section 2)
Doesn’t sound like me
Sounds a little like me
Sounds a lot like me
Forced Choice (Only for Scale G)
Choose A or B

Multicultural
No mention of multicultural aspect; however, considering the implications surrounding perception of leisure as a state of mind, a firm understanding of the clients perception of leisure would be necessary in interpreting results
Purpose
1. To enable users to assess their client’s leisure functioning

2. To enable users to determine areas in which improvement of current leisure functioning is needed

3. To enable users to determine the impact of offered services on leisure functioning

4. To facilitate research on the structure of leisure to enable a better understanding of the value , purpose, and outcomes of leisure experiences

The Assessment

LDB Long Form Version A
LDB Short Form Version B
LDB Short Form Version A
Long Form Version A- Ages 9-14, orthopedically impaired individuals, and/or higher functioning level educable mentally retarded individuals- also successful with ages 9-18 either handicapped or non-handicapped
Ages 9-14, non-disabled or orthopedically impaired individuals, and/or higher functioning level educable mentally retarded individuals- also successful with ages 9-18 either handicapped or non-handicapped
Adapted from Short Form Version A for adults, wording has been adapted to be more suitable for adults
Long Form Version C-

Adapted from Version A for adults, wording has been adapted to be more suitable for adults
Perceived Freedom
in Leisure
Section 1

Scale A

Perceived Leisure Competence Scale
Section 1

Scale B

Perceived Leisure
Control Scale
Section 1

Scale C

Leisure Needs Scale
Section 1

Scale D

Depth of Involvement
in Leisure Scale
Section 1

Scale E

Playfulness Scale
Section 2

Scale F

Barriers to Leisure
Involvement Scale
Section 2

Scale G

Leisure Preference Scale
Section 2

Scale H

Knowledge of Leisure
Opportunities Scale
Long Form Version A
Reliability
Reliability coefficients (alpha)-

Scale A: .83 - .94
Scale B: .86 - .94
Scale C: .88 - .93
Scale D: .88 - .96
Scale E: .90 - .94

Scale: A-E: .95 - .98

Stability- Test-Retest
Person’s Product-Moment
Correlation Coefficients

Scale A: .82, .88
Scale B: .81, .79
Scale C: .75, .75
Scale D: .77, .54
Scale E: .77, .90

Scale A-E: .89, .87

Scale F: .62, .76
Scale H: .61

Validity
Convergent Validity-
Supports Unitary concept
Scale A: .56 - .90
Scale B: .68 - .92
Scale C: .74 - .93
Scale D: .65 - .90
Scale E: .54 - .82

Predictive Validity-

Perception of less barriers was significantly correlated with higher scores on perceived freedom scales.

Non-significant correlation found between Greater knowledge of Leisure with perceived freedom in leisure

Short Form Version A
Reliability
Validity
Internal Consistency
Alpha reliability coefficients of .83 - .94

-Significant correlations found with the Barriers Scale

-No significant correlations with the Knowledge Test

-Significant correlation between perceived freedom and life satisfaction and leisure attitudes

-High correlation with Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (.39) (alpha .81) and the Willoughby Self Concept Scale (.22) (alpha .90)

-Strong correlation with Ragheb and Beard’s Leisure Satisfaction Scale (.81)

Short Form Version B
Reliability
Validity
Internal Consistency
Alpha reliability coefficients of .88 - .94

Predicative Validity
-Strong correlation with
Rosenberg Life Satisfaction Scale (.27)

-Discriminant Validity
No age and gender correlation
Ellis, G. D., & Witt, P. (1982). The Leisure Diagnostic Battery: Theoretical and empirical structure. Denton: North Texas State University


Long Form Version C
5 point Likert Scale
(All of section 1, Barriers to Leisure (G)
in Section 2)
Strongly Agree
Agree
Neither
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
Forced Choice (Only for Scale G)

Short Form Version A
3 point Likert scale
(All of section 1, Barriers to Leisure (G) in Section 2)
Doesn’t sound like me
Sounds a little like me
Sounds a lot like me
Forced Choice (Only for Scale G)
Choose A or B

Short Form Version B
5 point Likert Scale
(All of section 1, Barriers to Leisure (G)
in Section 2)
Strongly Agree
Agree
Neither
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
Forced Choice (Only for Scale G)

Sample Note
& Chart
Narrative Chart or Source-Oriented Record
Provides chronological account of status and intervention responses
What to document:
Change in client condition
Response to intervention
Lack of improvement
Client or family members comments

Example: AIR – Assessment, Intervention, Response


Conclusion
Extensive assessment. Need to have firm understanding of conceptual foundation before administering and interpreting. May take several days to complete. Well researched; however, limited current research to suggest it is still valid and reliable. Organization would need to generate norms for comparisons.




Could be used to create intervention. Below average scores in specific Scales would indicate area of need for intervention. May need to use in conjunction with a leisure preference assessment.
Selected Assessment Questions From the NCTRC Study Guide
Scoring Section 1
Tabulate score for each scale based on points (below), divide total by number of items in that scale
Doesn’t sound like me = 1
Sounds a little like me = 2
Sounds a lot like me = 3

Strongly Agree = 1
Agree = 2
Neither = 3
Disagree = 4
Strongly Disagree = 5

Perceived Freedom in Leisure Score
Add total number from all 5 Section 1 Scales, divide by total number of items

Scoring Section 2
Scoring Scale F
Doesn’t sound like me = 3
Sounds a little like me = 2
Sounds a lot like me = 1

Strongly Agree = 5
Agree = 4
Neither = 3
Disagree = 2
Strongly Disagree = 1

Add scores according to items subscale
Add all subscales together for a total score

Interpreting Section 1
Should begin with examination of Perceived Leisure Score- if scores are low, examination of the individual Scales may uncover area of remediation. Section 2 scales may be administered to gather additional information

-Compare scores with clients who take instrument at the same time
-Develop local or institutional norms
-Compare results with referenced group of similar subjects from the ‘normal population’
-User judgment based on a collection of evidence
-Combination- compare to relative rank within the group and local norms in addition to subjective judgment

Interpreting Scale F
Use same procedure in section 1
Generally scores above 6 indicate there may be a problem

Scoring Scale G
Each item has a code, add each time a code has been used and insert number under each scale (scales include: Nature/Outdoor, Music/Drama, etc.)

Example :
I would rather:
_____ Go camping. (N)
_____ Go bowling. (S)

Interpreting Scale G
Items 1-30 indicate preference to activity type
Items 31-60 indicate preference for risk vs. no risk activity

Scoring Scale H (only multiple choice section)
Use Tabulation Matrix for Knowledge of Leisure Opportunities Test
Correct answers are listed on score sheet
Add total correct scores for each sub-area
Add total scores from all sub-areas

Use similar procedure in section 1
Caution with sub-area scores as they have limited reliability, only use ion conjunction with other existing knowledge about client

“Overall Perceived Leisure Score above average compared to organizational norms. Score does not appear to be an accurate based on observation, family reporting, and current leisure involvement. Upon further review, Scale B Perceived Leisure Control scores were well below organizational norms. Section 2 of the Leisure Diagnostic Battery will be administered to assess leisure barriers.”
A CTRS is interested in determining a patient's leisure interests. From the following options, the CTRS should choose what assessment?
A. Leisure Diagnostic Battery
B. Leisure Scope
C. BANDI-RT
D. CERT-Psych
In the process of developing an assertive instrument, the CTRS observes and rates the client. Then the first CTRS has another CTRS observe and rate the client in the same functional behaviors. The ratings are then compared, with a nearly perfect coefficient. What instrument characteristic is being determined?
A. Validity
B. Reliability
C. Usability
D. Practicality
If a client assessment produces results that are reliable, it means that
A. The content of the assessment matches the content of the intervention program

B. The same client will receive about the same score if given the assessment twice

C. Clients are placed into the most appropriate programs to mee their needs

D. Two different assessments will produce the same results over time
Which of the following assessments was designed to coincide with the Functional Independence Measure?
A. Leisure Diagnostic Battery
B. CERT-Psych
C. Leisure Competence Measure
D. Leisure Activities Blank

The purpose of an assessment protocol is to
A. Make sure every client has the same diagnosis and treatment plan

B. Increase sensitivity to cultural minorities

C. Align TR assessment with the OT assessment

D. Increase reliability of the assessment administration.
The CTRS working in a psychiatric facility for adults needs an assessment instrument that has the capability of monitoring clients in the three areas of general performance, individual performance, and group performance. Which assessment is MOST suitable?
A. Leisure Diagnostic Battery
B. CERT-Psych
C. Self-Leisure Interest Profile
D. Leisure Activities Blank
A CTRS is interested in determining behaviors that relate to a person's ability to successfully integrate into society using his/her social interaction skills. What assessment should be used?
A. Leisure Diagnostic Battery
B. Leisurescope
C. BENDI-RT
D. CERT-Psych
The overall content covered by the Leisure Diagnostic Battery includes
A. Leisure Participation History
B. Leisure Interests
C. Attitudes Towards Leisure and Work
D. Perceived Freedom in Leisure

Designed to measure the extent to which
an individual believes he/she is competent in leisure
Four Domains of Competence
Cognitive
Physical
Social
General
Designed to measure the degree of internality, or the extent to which the individual controls events and outcomes in his/her leisure experiences
Designed to measure ability to satisfy intrinsic needs via recreation & leisure experiences
Domains:
Relaxation Surplus Energy
Compensation Catharsis
Optimal Arousal Gregariousness
Status Creative Expression
Skill Development Self Image
Designed to measure extent to which individuals become absorbed or achieve 'flow' during activities
Domains :
-Centering of Attention
-Merging of Action & Awareness
-Loss of Self-Consciousness
-Perception of Control Over Self & Environment
-Non-Contradictory Demands for Action with
Immediate Feedback
Designed to measure the individuals degree of playfulness
Domains :
Cognitive Spontaneity
Physical Spontaneity
Social Spontaneity
Manifest Joy
Designed to measure the problems the individual encounters when trying to select, or participate in leisure experiences
Domains :
Communication
Social
Decision Making
Opportunity
Motivation
Ability
Money
Time
Designed to measure individual's patterns of selection among activities- also measures preference for mode or style of involvement
Activity Domains:
Outdoor/Nature
Music/Dance/Drama
Sports
Arts/Crafts/Hobbies
Mental Linguistics

Style Domains:
Individual/Group
Risk/Non-Risk
Active Passive
Designed to measure the individual's knowledge of specific information concerning leisure opportunities
Domains :
Cost
Who Can Participate
Where
When
What
Full transcript