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Copy of RIZAL'S ANCESTRY

Determining the Roots of a Hero
by

Shekaina Diaz

on 3 October 2013

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Transcript of Copy of RIZAL'S ANCESTRY

Thank you for your attention!
And one more thing...
Francisco Engracio
Rizal Mercado
RIZAL'S ANCESTRY
DETERMINING THE ROOTS OF A HERO
Teodora Morales Alonzo Realonda y Quintos
Saturnina
Rizal
Paciano
Rizal
Narcissa
Rizal
Olympia
Rizal
Lucia
Rizal
Maria
Rizal
Jose
Rizal
Concepcion
Rizal
Josefa
Rizal
Soledad
Rizal
RIZAL'S FAMILY TREE
RIZAL'S CHINESE ANCESTRY
Juan Mercado
Cirila Alejandro
Francisco Mercado
Cirila Bernacha
Domingo Lamco
Ines de la Rosa
Brigida de Quintos
Lorenzo Alberto
Manuel de Quintos
Regina Ursua
Eugenio Ursua
Benigna
Lam-co had a distinguished lineage. He belonged to the Cua clan of south China. The ztoday are prosperous and distinguished families in Asia. The Cuas are a very ancient line, which can be traced to many generations to the times when unified China was still non-existent.
They are the descendants of Shu Du, the 5th son of Zhou Wu Wang, the
political genius who started the Chou dynasty. It was 600 years later when his descendants formalized the usage of the surname Cai.
Domingo Lam-co, Rizal’s great-great-grandfather, was the 19th generation descendant of the Cai Shu Du.
What's with the change of name?
In 1849, then Governor-General of the Philippines Narciso Claveria, issued a Decree by which native Filipino and immigrant families were to adopt Spanish surnames from a list of Spanish family names. Although the Chino Mestizos were allowed to hold on to their Chinese surnames, Lam-co changed his surname to the Spanish "Mercado" (market), possibly to indicate their Chinese merchant roots. José's father Francisco adopted the surname "Rizal" (originally Ricial, the green of young growth or green fields), which was suggested to him by a provincial governor, or as José had described him, "a friend of the family". However, the name change caused confusion in the business affairs of Francisco, most of which were begun under the old name. After a few years, he settled on the name "Rizal Mercado" as a compromise, but usually just used the original surname "Mercado".
Upon enrolling at the Ateneo Municipal de Manila, José dropped the last three names that make up his full name, on the advice of his brother, Paciano Rizal Mercado, and the Rizal Mercado family, thus rendering his name as "José Protasio Rizal". Of this, Rizal writes: "My family never paid much attention [to our second surname Rizal], but now I had to use it, thus giving me the appearance of an illegitimate child!"[16] This was to enable him to travel freely and disassociate him from his brother, who had gained notoriety with his earlier links with native priests who were sentenced to death as subversives. From early childhood, José and Paciano were already advancing unheard-of political ideas of freedom and individual rights which infuriated the authorities. Despite the name change, José, as "Rizal" soon distinguished himself in poetry writing contests, impressing his professors with his facility with Castilian and other foreign languages, and later, in writing essays that were critical of the Spanish historical accounts of the pre-colonial Philippine societies. Indeed, by 1891, the year he finished his El filibusterismo, this second surname had become so well known that, as he writes to another friend, "All my family now carry the name Rizal instead of Mercado because the name Rizal means persecution! Good! I too want to join them and be worthy of this family name...”
So what do we have now?
Jose Rizal had his Chinese roots from his paternal side while he inherited Japanese and Spanish roots from his maternal side.
I’d like to end this presentation with a quote from Barbara:
What’s wrong? Just tell the truth. The truth is the best thing. It will show Filipinos that anybody can be a hero.
By: Aprille E. De Castro
Full transcript