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Referencing and Plagiarism

Unfinished. Draft #1. For students who are new to referencing
by

Sophie Burton

on 10 October 2013

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Transcript of Referencing and Plagiarism

Referencing
&
Plagiarism

What is
referencing
?
And, used well, the sources you cite can give your own conclusions credibility.
Using other people's information or ideas without crediting them is
plagiarism
Why ?
But also!
In general terms plagiarism is presenting someone else's work or ideas as your own.


Plagiarism is taken very seriously and is classed as cheating.


If you fail to reference your sources properly you are committing plagiarism.
What is
Plagiarism
?
The good news is...!
You can avoid plagiarism simply by ensuring you reference all your sources
Reference at the time you are using a source (don't leave it until you have written your essay)
Make it easy for yourself
Here's one I made earlier...
An in-text reference, a
citation
citing your sources:
author/date
The seeds inside an apple are


new individuals


(Jacobsen, 2013
:3
)
.
As

Jacobsen

points out the seeds inside an apple are always unique
(2013)
.
The seeds inside an apple are always unique

(Jacobsen, 2013)
.
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
In addition to citations in your text you also cite your sources in more detail at the end of your work
A
reference list
A
bibliography
A list of

the sources you cited in your essay
A wider list:

all the sources you consulted as part of your research
(even those not cited in your text)
Whether listing sources in a reference list or bibliography the details you provide at the end are the same
A book:
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
A journal article (printed):
A journal article (online/eJournal):
A web page:
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
Resources and guides
On your course pages on Blackboard go to:
>Resources
>Study Skills
>Essay writing and referencing

Here you will find the following guides:
Why reference? (Plymouth Uni guide)
How to reference (Plymouth Uni guide)
Referencing crib sheet (from me)
Goldsmiths Referencing guide (for referencing photos in books)


Cite Them Right 371.3 PEA (CG LRC)
More on the
author
2-3 authors?
Include all names in the order they appear on the title page:
Citation: (Burton, Smith and Jones, 2013)
Reference list: Burton, S., Smith, J. and Jones, S.
4+ authors?
Ciation: (Burton et al, 2013)
Reference list: Burton, S., Smith, J., Jones, S. and Ford, M.
Written by an organisation or company with no named author?
Use the organisation or company name as the author:
Citation: (National Trust, 2013)
Reference list: National Trust
Is the resource compiled by an editor?
Use the editor's name as the author name:
Citation: (Ramsay, 2013) or (Ramsay and Slater, 2013)
Reference list: Ramsay, G. (ed) or Ramsay, G. and Slater, N. (eds)
None of the above in sight?
Do not use 'Anon'
Use the title of the work instead:
More on the
date
For books the date = the year of publication
For web pages the date = the year the site was published or last updated
What if there isn't a date?

You write 'no date':
(no date)
If a resource has no date you might query how useful it is
This is a good way to work and saves you trying to track down sources of information you found weeks or months ago.
When writing a piece of work you
must
provide information about the sources you have consulted
What is
referencing
?
The information you are required to provide about each source is determined by the referencing style you follow. In your case it is the:
How do we
reference
?
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
Photographs, paintings or illustrations:
Source of referencing guidelines: Goldsmith's University guide to Harvard referencing
The aim of referencing is to ensure that any reader can use the information you have provided to access the sources you have cited, i.e. if you cite a journal article your reader needs to be able to use your references to find and read that journal article themselves.

Readers may want to do this as further reading but they might also want to do it to check the evidence on which your argument is based
Referencing can help you get a better grade!
It can highlight the time you've taken to locate and analyse relevant material.
Harvard style
Part II- what information do I need to record?
For all sources you will provide the author and date (where this information is available). The other details vary from source to source, read on to find out more...
Please see the sample essay to see how we reference.
In the text: Citations
After the text: Reference List
At the end of the piece of work: Bibliography
In a reference list or bibliography the sources are organised alphabetically by author surname
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
A newspaper article (printed):
Generally quotes are short and direct and go in quotation marks. Cite Them Right classifies a short quotation as no more than two or three lines:

There is only one way to reproduce a particular apple variety: you must take a cutting from the original tree, ‘graft it onto living rootstock and let it grow’ (Jacobsen, 2013:3).
An in-text reference, a
citation
So assuming a long quotation is something that is more than three lines long, long quotes are presented as a new paragraph and are indented from the main text.

Jacobsen provides extensive information about apple varieties in his latest article, he writes:

The key thing to understand about apple varieties is that apples do not come true from seed. An apple fruit is a disposable womb of the mother tree, but the seeds it encloses are new individuals, each containing a unique combination of genes from the mother tree and the mystery dad, whose contribution arrived in a pollen packet inadvertently carried by a springtime bee.
Harvard style
reference list
or
bibliography
YOUR photographs:
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