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A Variety of Participation Techniques

Examples of participation techniques for faculty to incorporate into their online classroom
by

Faculty Development

on 19 February 2014

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Transcript of A Variety of Participation Techniques

Encourage timely participation
Make the topic interesting and relevant
A Variety
of
Participation Techniques
Ask open-ended questions to provide opportunity for ongoing dialogue
Encourage clear, concise dialogue
Create a safe environment
Presented by
Faculty Training & Development

The discussion forums are an integral component to a student’s online, educational experience. They provide opportunities for students to
• Engage with their peers and instructor
• Build a sense of community, and
• Discuss course topics.
According to Rob Kelly, it also provides an excellent opportunity for students to perfect their presentation skills.
"If you don’t have discussion in the course, it could be considered more like a correspondence class because there’s not the interaction, and interaction is so important to creating that community of learners, to getting the students comfortable with expressing their thoughts."
Educators Glenna Decker and Sarah Cox wanted to learn more about what motivates students to participate in online discussions, so they surveyed undergraduate and graduate students to find out.
Not only did they learn what motivates students to participate, they also compiled their version of best practices. These, supported with GCU’s best practices, are sure to help faculty incorporate a variety of facilitation techniques in their classes.
Pose questions that relate to students' immediate lives or connect to their future
Discuss current events
•Search the Internet and/or GCU library
•Look for timely and controversial sub-topics
•Find videos to support the sub-topic and send students on an electronic field trip
The DQ1 in PSY-470: How can the effects of deinstitutionalization be seen today?
On the first day of the week, add a classroom opinion poll for students to agree or disagree with a statement or prompt
Instructors can use the "Like" feature in LoudCloud to poll students
Encourage students' opinions backed up by referencing and literature
Post everyday ethical dilemmas by asking students to respond to a case study with a discipline-related ethical dilemma
Students and instructors welcome succinct, to-the-point responses
Add focused listing posts to draw attention to an important term, name, or concept and direct students to list ideas related to the "focus"
Students need an honest, open, and respectful environment
Instructors have the responsibility of setting this tone from the beginning
Decker, Glenna L., EdD, and Cox, Sarah J., 2011 , pp. 5-6

Angelo, Thomas A., and Cross, Patricia K. Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers (1993). Jossey-Bass.

Incorporate inspirational and relevant quotes in announcements and discussion forums
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