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Why do we study poetry?

An introduction to poetic forms and devices
by

Liz Helton

on 4 April 2013

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Transcript of Why do we study poetry?

The Meaning of Words Allegory
Allusion
Ambiguity
Analogy
Apostrophe
Cliche
Connotation
Contrast
Denotation
Euphemism
Hyperbole The Sounds of Words How do we define poetry? Lyrics as poetry
What feeling does poetry evoke? Arranging the Words Point of View
Line
Verse
Stanza
Stanza Forms
Rhetorical Question
Rhyme Scheme
Enjambment
Form (Open, Close, Blank Verse, Free Verse, Couplet, Heroic Couplet, Quatrain)
Fixed forms The Images of Words Imagery
Mood
Tone
Synesthesia Why do we study poetry? Invisible Architecture "I think that we're beginning to remember that the first poets didn't come out of a classroom, that poetry began when somebody walked off of a savanna or out of a cave and looked up at the sky with wonder and said, "Ahhh." That was the first poem."

Lucille Clifton "Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings"

William Wordsworth "A perfect poem is impossible.
Once it had been written,
the world would end."

Robert Graves Walt Whitman
1819-1892 Born in Long Island, NY
Lived in Brooklyn
Worked as a newspaperman and printer
Published "Leaves of Grass" in 1855
Called an "American bard" by Ralph Waldo Emerson
"the United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem." Alliteration
Assonance
Consonance
Cacophony
Euphony
Onomatopoeia
Repetition
Rhyme
Rhythm Irony
Metaphor
Metonymy
Oxymoron
Paradox
Personification
Pun
Simile
Symbol
Synecdoche
Full transcript