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How to use a Microscope

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by

Baustin Welch

on 8 January 2014

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Transcript of How to use a Microscope

Scanning
Low
High
1. Eyepiece
2. Body tube
3. Nose-piece
4. Objective lenses
5. Arm
6. Coarse adjustment knob
7. Fine adjustment knob
8. Stage
9. Stage clips
10. Base
11. Diaphragm
12. Light/mirror
Why?
I believe that the world can be a cleaner place and that there is an undiscovered technology that can serve as a stable, efficient, and clean energy source for the world.
A Microscopic World
Who Am I?
Education
NDSU, Masters of Biological Sciences
NDSU, Bachelors of Sciences
Major: Biotechnology
Minor: General Agriculture
Experience
Research Associate
Syngenta
Provided technical assistance.
Associate Biomass Research Scientist
POET
Conducted research experiments and analyzed results for project leads.
Senior Biomass Research Scientist
POET
Conduct experiments and provide direction for projects and new experiments.
Your here WHY?
What are light microscopes?

How are the they used?
The Microscope

Background Info.

Parts of the Microscope

Terms to KNOW

Making a slide...

Adjust the view
Background Info.
Parts of the Microscope
Terms to KNOW
Making a Slide...
Adjust the View
1.
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6.
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12.
The
Aperture
is the hole in the stage that lets a certain amount of light to reach the specimen.
Field of view:
area that's visible when you look through the eyepiece.
Head:
Monocular
- one eyepiece
Dual Head
- two eye piece for two different people.
Binocular
- -two eye pieces
Luminosity:
the amount of light that is coming from a source.
Brightness:
the amount of light that an object receives.
Total Magnification:
is the multiplication of the
eyepiece
and the
objective lens
at that power.

Resolution:
the amount of detail you can see in a image (increasing magnification will NOT improve resolution).
Magnification:
how much an image is enlarged under a microscope.
Types of Microscopes
Compound
Are light illuminated.
2-dimensional view.
Can view individual cells.
High Magnification but low resolution.
Mechanical focusing.
Confocal Microscope
Microscope uses a laser light.
Laser light scan
Digital image
Computer screen view.
Glass slides with died samples.
Computer motorized focusing mechanism.
Electron Microscopes
scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)
Uses electron illumination.
3-D image.
High magnification and resolution.
Specimen coated in gold.
Black and white photos.
Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM)
Electron illuminated.
2-D View
Thin slices of specimen obtained.
High magnification and resolution.
Dead specimens
Why is the Light Microscope so special?
Materials
Light Microscope

Cover slips

Glass Slide

A specimen
Live specimens can be observed

Colors can be seen


Dual
Binocular
Take a glass slide and clean it of any smudges and debris.
Place specimen on slide.
Carefully place cover slip over specimen.
Make sure this is done slowly because air pockets can disrupt the view.
Scanning Power- 40x
Low Power- 100x
High Power-400x
Always start with Scanning--don't scratch the lenses!
Live Specimens
Studied slices of cork, describing "pores" in the material.

Developed Compound Microscope and Illumination System.

If he had not known how to use a microscope then the discovery of cells would have been delayed for... who knows how long.
Robert Hooke
Works Cited
http://www.csun.edu/scied/7-microscopy/micro_tutorial/
http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/microscope_use.html#.Up-Il8SkqJk
http://www.microscope-microscope.org/basic/preparing-microscope-slides.htm
http://www.hometrainingtools.com/microscope-terms-science-teaching-tip/a/1191/
http://typesofmicroscopes.net/types-of-light-microscopes/
http://www.cas.miamioh.edu/mbi-ws/microscopes/types.html

QUESTIONS...
Full transcript