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Big Bend National Park

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by

Jasen Moreno

on 3 March 2014

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Transcript of Big Bend National Park

National Park Project
Info about the Park
Ecological Balances
Within in Big Bend National Park, there three different types of environment, which means there are three different food chains. As well as creating different food chains, the different environments add limiting factors and succession to the Big Bend ecosystem.
Food Chain: Desert
Conclusion
Thank you for your time!!
Big Bend National Park
This is the map of it.
Several highways lead to Big Bend National Park: TX 118 from Alpine to Study Butte or FM 170 from Presidio to Study Butte (then 26 miles east to park headquarters) or US 90 or US 385 to Marathon (then 70 miles south to park headquarters).
The biome of it is mostly desert and arid. It also has River and Mountain.
Frankia
Bacteria
Decomposers
The Road
Runner
The
Rattlesnake
The Western
Whiptail
The Coach
Whip Snake
The Kangaroo
Rat
The Desert
Big Horn
Sheep
The Cricket
The Pronghorn
Anteope
The Agave
Plant
The Yucca
Plant
The Creosote
Plant
4th level
Consumers
3rd level
Consumers
2nd Level
Consumers
1st level
Consumers
Producers
Food Chain:River
Decomposers
E. Coli
Bacteria
Catfish
Garfish
Turtle
Couch's
Spadefoot Toad
Mosquito
Fish
Vermillion
Flycatcher
Mosquito
Beaver
Willow Tree
Cottonwood
Tree
Food Chain:Mountain
Frankia
Bacteria
Coyote
Mountain
Lion
Black Bear
Whitetail
Deer
Javalina
Pig
Juniper
Tree
Madrone
Tree
Persimmon
Tree
Blooming
Century
Plant
Agarita
Bush
Limiting Factors and Succession
Even though having three different environments in Big Bend allows a wide variety of animals to live within the park, it also limits the areas in which they can survive.
After the vast overgrazing starting in 1900, Big Bend was soon a barren desert. After it became a national park, not many plants and grasses grew back, but the number of cacti increased vastly.

Abiotic Factors
The Rio Grande
Temperature
Biotic Factors
The Animals/Plants
Humans
Different Species
Animals
Plants
Black Bear
Coyote
Jackrabbit
Javelina
Mountain Lion
Mule Deer
Turkey and Black Vulture
Peregrine Falcon and Montezuma Quail
Agave
Sotol
Nolina
Oaks
Mesquite
Pinon Pine
Juniper
Yuccas
Prickly Pear and Cottonwood
Other Interesting Facts
Big Bend is the only national park that has three different environments coexisting in a confined area.
Big Bend is the largest national park, but also the least-visited park.
Within all of Big Bend, there are only five paved roads.
Average Temp. and Precipitation
Geological History
Big Bend started out as part of a deep-ocean trough, which stretched from present-day Arkansas and Oklahoma to the Southwest region of Texas where Big Bend is found.
With that lasting at least 200 million years, sediment from the highlands accumulated in the trough which formed layers of gravel,sand, and clay, which turned into sandstone and shale beds after some time.
Human History
The first recorded group of humans living in Big Bend were several tribes of Native Americans, Including; The Chisos, The Jumano, The Mescalero Apaches, and the Comaches.
After 1535 the Spanish explorations reached Big Bend in search of gold, silver, farmland and ranchland.
What To Do
With only two day in Big
Bend, you could spend
your time going on the Auto Tours, which will
show you most of the
park from the main roads, but more than two days is required to see it all.
With a week in Big
Bend, you could see just
about all of Big Bend, traveling on all the
paved roads and some
of the dirt roads, or even going on a long hike through Big Bend.
Park Ranger
National Park Service Rangers are among the uniformed employees charged with protecting and preserving areas set aside in the National Park System by the United States Congress and/or the President of the United States. While all employees of the agency contribute to the National Park Service mission of preserving unimpaired the natural and cultural resources set aside by the American people for future generations, the term Park Ranger is traditionally used to describe all National Park Service employees who wear the uniform. Broadly speaking, all National Park Service rangers promote stewardship of the resources in their care - either voluntary stewardship via resource interpretation, or compliance with statute or regulation through law enforcement. These comprise the two main disciplines of the ranger profession in the National Park Service.
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