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The Underground Railroad

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Morgan Mabrey

on 7 April 2014

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Transcript of The Underground Railroad

Political Cartoon Supporting the Movement
Who Was Involved In The Movement?
Effects of the Movement
6th hour
Monday, April 4, 2014
Morgan Mabrey
Alexis Artym
What it was:
Problems that caused the Movement
Political Cartoon Against the Movement
The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century slaves to escape to free states and Canada.
-The Fugitive Slave Law or Fugitive Slave Act was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as part of the Compromise of 1850 It declared that all runaway slaves be brought back to their masters. Abolitionists nicknamed it the "Bloodhound Law" for the dogs that were used to track down runaway slaves.

The Underground Railroad
Works Cited:
.comstaff, History. "Underground Railroad." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2014.

Connor, Tiffany. "How the Underground Railroad Worked." HowStuffWorks. Howstuffworks.com, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2014.

Tauriello, David. "Pathways to Freedom | About This Site | Credits." Pathways to Freedom | About This Site | Credits. Maryland Public Television, 2009. Web. 02 Apr. 2014.

"The Underground Railroad: Journey to Freedom." - National Geographic Education. National Geographic Magazine, n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2014.

The History Place. "The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Frederick Douglass Speech - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery." The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Frederick Douglass Speech - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery. Google AdSense, n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2014.
Harriet Tubman was one of the most famous Underground Railroad conductors. After making her own successful escape, she came back to Maryland many times to lead family members, friends, and other slaves to freedom. She knew many routes through the woods and fields.
Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland. he was known as widely recognized national speaker. He traveled throughout the North giving vivid firsthand accounts of slavery, abolition, segregation, and discrimination. because he himself was a slave untill he escaped.
William Still, a free black man who lived in Philadelphia, was at the focal point of Underground Railroad activities in the East. He received many fugitives from Maryland, where his mother was born. He helped fugitives who stayed in Philadelphia find homes and jobs. He arranged for many escaping slaves to continue their journey on to Canada.

-The underground railroad led the slaves to freedom and gave them even more courage to stand up for themselves
Thomas Garrett, a Quaker from Wilmington, Delaware, worked closely with Harriet Tubman and other conductors who led slaves out of Maryland. Tubman and other conductors led people to Garrett's house. Garrett would then arrange to move the group on to southern Pennsylvania. He forwarded many people to Philadelphia,
-The underground railroad also had people known as conductors who went to the south and helped guide slaves to safety. One of the most important of these was the former slave, Harriet Tubman.
-Plantation owners became concerned at the large number of slaves escaping to the North and in 1850 managed to persuade Congress to pass the Fugitive Slave Act. In future, any federal marshal who did not arrest an alleged runaway slave could be fined $1,000. later the Fugitive Slave Act failed to stop the underground railroad. Thomas Garrett, the Delaware station-master, paid more than $8,000 in fines
-Anyone who worked for the railroad had their lives in danger and was going against the law.
This image is displaying how the whites or any farm owners needed to have a look out for any runaway slaves after the fugitive slave act.
This cartoon was supporting the railroad. you can see as a slave is trying to reach for the night sky with chains attached trying to get to freedom.
Fedrick douglass
Speech:
Fellow citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are today rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, "may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!"
To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs and to chime in with the popular theme would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world.
My subject, then, fellow citizens, is "American Slavery." I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave's point of view. Standing here, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July.
Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting. America is false to the past, false to the present, and solemnly binds herself to be false to the future. Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave on this occasion, I will, in the name of humanity, which is outraged, in the name of liberty, which is fettered, in the name of the Constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery -- the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate - I will not excuse." I will use the severest language I can command, and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgment is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slave-holder, shall not confess to be right and just.



Fellow citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are today rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, "may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!"
To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs and to chime in with the popular theme would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world.
My subject, then, fellow citizens, is "American Slavery." I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave's point of view. Standing here, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July.
Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting. America is false to the past, false to the present, and solemnly binds herself to be false to the future. Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave on this occasion, I will, in the name of humanity, which is outraged, in the name of liberty, which is fettered, in the name of the Constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery -- the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate - I will not excuse." I will use the severest language I can command, and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgment is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slave-holder, shall not confess to be right and just.
*****Frederick Douglass - July 4, 1852


http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/douglass.htm
Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland. he was known as widely recognized national speaker. He traveled throughout the North giving vivid firsthand accounts of slavery, abolition, segregation, and discrimination. because he himself was a slave untill he escaped.
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