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What Does The National FFA Emblem & Its Five Symbols Represe

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by

Jose AlaTorre

on 6 May 2014

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Transcript of What Does The National FFA Emblem & Its Five Symbols Represe

What Does The National FFA Emblem & Its Five Symbols Represent?
The Rising Sun
The national FFA emblem, consisting of five
symbols, is representative of the history, goals
and future of the organization. As a whole, the
emblem covers the broad spectrum of FFA and
agriculture. Each element within the emblem
has unique significance.
The National FFA Emblem
The Cross Section Of The Ear Of Corn
The cross section of the ear of corn provides
the foundation of the emblem, just as corn has
historically served as the foundation crop of
American agriculture. It is also a symbol of
unity, as corn is grown in every state of the
nation. The Secretary is stationed by ear of corn, the secretary keeps an accurate record of all meetings and correspond with other secretaries wherever corn is
grown and FFA members meet.
The rising sun signifies progress and holds a promise that tomorrow will bring a new day, glowing with opportunity. The vice president is stationed beneath the rising sun. "The rising sun is the token of a new era in agriculture. If we will follow the leadership of our president, we shall be led out of the darkness of selfishness and into the glorious sunlight of brotherhood and cooperation.
The Plow
The plow signifies labor and tillage of the soil,
the backbone of agriculture and the historic
foundation of our country’s strength. The vice president keeps a plow at her station. "The plow is the symbol of labor and tillage of the soil. Without labor, neither knowledge nor wisdom can accomplish much. My duties require me to assist at all times in directing the work of our organization. I preside over meetings in the absence of our president, whose place is beneath the rising sun.
The Owl
The owl, long recognized for its wisdom, symbolizes the knowledge required to be successful in the industry of agriculture. The owl is also the symbol of the advisor. An important part of having knowledge and wisdom is understanding the needs of an individual and a situation and knowing if and when to share your advice.
The Eagle
The eagle is a national symbol which serves as a
reminder of our freedom and ability to explore
new horizons for the future of agriculture. The eagle clasps in its talons the American shield. The American flag is the symbol of the reporter. "Just as the flag covers the United States," the reporter strives to promote the FFA and inform the public of its opportunities and the accomplishments of its members.
The Words Agricultural Education & FFA
The words Agricultural Education and FFA are
emblazoned in the center to signify the combination of learning and leadership necessary for progressive agriculture. The only officer not represented in the emblem is the sentinel. Symbolized by the clasp of friendship, the sentinel ensures that, "the doors are open to our friends at all times and that they are welcome
The FFA Motto
The FFA motto gives members twelve short
words to live by as they discover the opportunities
available in the organization:
Learning to Do,
Doing to Learn,
Earning to Live,
Living to Serve.
Full transcript