Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

MENTAL HEALTH

No description
by

Amy Shapton

on 29 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of MENTAL HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH
What is mental health?
Mental health is part of your overall health
Mental health issues can affect one's confidence, esteem and coping skills
Mental illnesses or mental health disorders are defined as psychological abnormality in thinking, behavior and moods.
It is often associated with distress, impaired functioning or disability of some form.
Genetics, biological and environmental factors can lead to mental disorders in men, women and children of all ages.

There are many different types of mental health issues, illnesses and disorders:

Why is mental health awareness important?
Behaviours
There are 2 types of behaviour that may be present : Internalized and Externalized
Internalizing Behaviours
Externalizing Behaviours
Externalizing behaviors are actions that are inflicted upon others.
A person who shows externalizing behaviors
does things that harm others
as opposed to lashing out at one's self.

Externalizing behaviors could include conduct and oppositional behaviours, physical aggression, verbal bullying, relational aggression, defiance, theft and vandalism.



Mental Health Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
[Generalized Anxiety, Panic Disorder, Specific Phobia, Social Anxiety, Obsessive Compulsive (OCD) and Post-Traumatic Stress (PTSD)]
Childhood Disorders
-
commonly found during childhood
[Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism, Conduct Disorder, Dyslexia, Encopresis, Enuresis, Intellectual Disability, Learning Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), Pica, Reactive Attachment, Rett's, Selective Mutism, Separation Anxiety, Stereotypic Movement, Tic and Tourettes Syndrome]
Cognitive Disorders
[Delirium and Dementia]
Dissociative Disorders
[Depersonalization Disorder, Dissociative Amnesia and Dissociative Fugue]
Eating Disorders
[Anorexia Nervosa, Binge Eating, Bulimia Nervosa and Rumination]
Impulse Control
[Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Kleptomania, Pyromania and Trichotillmania]
Mood Disorders
[Bipolar, Major Depression, Manic Depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)]
Personality Disorders
[Multiple Personality Disorder, Paranoia and Schizophrenia]
Sexual Disorders
Sleep Disorders
Substance Abuse

Early Detection for Referrals
It estimated that nearly
1 in 5
Ontario children under the age of 19 experiences a mental, emotional or behavioural disorder that is severe enough to seriously affect their daily functioning at home, school or within the community.


The good news is that
early diagnosis and treatment lead to better outcomes
for children later in life, as most mental health problems begin in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood. Early identification followed by effective intervention is critically important, as the severity of a child or adolescent's symptoms intensifies as they age and behaviour problems can emerge.


http://www.kidsmentalhealth.ca/parents/resources_parents.php
Mental Health Awareness in Schools
Mental Health Thematic Classroom -
customizable online classroom allows educators and students access to a range of free online tools, resources, and
learning activities about youth mental health.
http://www.tigweb.org/tiged/projects/mentalhealth/

Internalizing behaviors are actions inflicted upon one's self
. A person who shows internalizing behaviors does things that harm him or her self as opposed to lashing out at others. Internalizing behaviors
are more likely to go unnoticed
and are more "socially acceptable" than externalized behaviors, which directly affect other people.

Internalizing behaviors could include eating too much or too little, feeling depressed, abusing substances and cutting.


http://www.buzzle.com/articles/types-mental-illness-list-disorders.html
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/types-mental-illness-list-disorders.html
http://tweenparenting.about.com/od/behaviordiscipline/a/Internalizing-Behaviors.htm
http://tweenparenting.about.com/od/behaviordiscipline/a/Externalizing-Behavior.htm
Talking with Parents about Mental Health
Froese-Germain, B. & Riel, R. (2012). Understanding Teachers' Perspectives on Student Mental Health: Findings from a National Survey. Ottawa, ON. Canadian Teachers' Federation. Located at : http://www.ctf-fce.ca/Documents/StudentMentalHealthReport.pdf
Froese-Germain, B. & Riel, R. (2012). Understanding Teachers' Perspectives on Student Mental Health: Findings from a National Survey. Ottawa, ON. Canadian Teachers' Federation. Located at : http://www.ctf-fce.ca/Documents/StudentMentalHealthReport.pdf
In a National Survey completed by the Canadian Teachers' Federation in 2012, it was found that,
"there is an incongruence between instructional practices used with students with emotional and behavioural
disorders (EBD) and their needs ... schools have address the internalized and externalized behaviours of students
with EBD through measures that keep them away from school (school suspensions and expulsions) rather than
through proactive measures designed to keep them in school. A focus on transferring students to alternative
educational placements due to behavioural concerns has superseded the development of proactive support systems
within schools to address the diverse needs of students ... there is a disconnect between what students with EBD
need from schools and what they are actually provided. It is evident that the overall school milieu does not support
the needs of these students."




Froese-Germain, B. & Riel, R. (2012). Understanding Teachers' Perspectives on Student Mental Health: Findings from a National Survey. Ottawa, ON. Canadian Teachers' Federation.
Located at : http://www.ctf-fce.ca/Documents/StudentMentalHealthReport.pdf
Discussion :
How are we addressing mental health within our school?
Are we providing opportunities for student awareness?
In Canada, approximately 15 to 20 percent of children and adolescents suffer from some form of mental health disorder
1 out of 5 students in the average classroom suffer from some form of mental health disorder
In Canada, 70% of adults living with a mental illness indicated the onset occurred before they were 18 years of age, 50% indicated that it started before age 14.
Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 16-24 year-olds and most people who commit suicide have a diagnosable mental illness.

image: Orientation to Child + Youth Mental Health Services: A guide for teachers
It can be a difficult task to talk with parents about topics in Mental Health.
As a teacher, it can be a challenge to have to tell a parent about your observations. It is often times valuable to talk with your school counselor, principal or vice principal to discuss ways to talk with parents.
Here are some examples:
image: Orientation to Child + Youth Mental Health Services: A guide for teachers
image: Orientation to Child + Youth Mental Health Services: A guide for teachers
Agenda :
What is mental health?
Why is mental health awareness important?
Early Detection for Referrals
Risk Factors vs. Protective Factors
Behaviours : Internalizing and Externalizing
Talking with Parents about Mental Health
Mental Health Awareness in Our School
Behaviour Characteristics in the Classroom
Protective Factors
- Protective factors for children's mental health include some things that can be built around children, such as safe and supportive communities, neighborhoods, and schools with clear rules and consequences as well as high expectations for their children

Children’s Mental Health as a Public Health Issue: What a difference it could make.
National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, online article, adapted from a presentation by Dr. Glun G. Caldwell, University of Kentucky College of Public Health (2006).

Risk Factors
Risk factors for children’s mental health include some things that can be changed, such as community, violence, poverty, insufficient housing, and poor nutrition.

Children’s Mental Health as a Public Health Issue: What a difference it could make.
National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, online article, adapted from a presentation by Dr. Glun G. Caldwell, University of Kentucky College of Public Health (2006).

Behavioural Characteristics :
What Teachers Should Look for in the Classroom
Mental health is very serious and is common with students in our classrooms more than one may think. We have outlines four specific disorders that fall into the mental health category, as we as their characteristics and some strategies for teachers in the classroom setting:
Refusal to attend school

Tantrums, tears, clinging when left at school by the parent

Excessive “homesickness” during over-night school trips

Clinging to the teacher

Anxiety Disorders
Creating a "coping" book or key chain whereby the child has a guide to help take various steps for dealing his his/her anxiety.

Example :


- Take 5 deep breaths - Take time out - Go to office
- Draw in a journal - Walk down the hall - Get medication, if required
- Count from fifty backwards - Go to mentor or teacher - Call home
- Visualize a calm place
Stage 1 - In the Class
Stage 2 - Outside
Stage 3 - Outside
Classroom Strategy
Constant worry or tension

Extreme need for reassurance

Somatic symptoms (headaches, stomach aches)

Avoidance of stressful situations such as tests

Clingy behaviour in young children

General Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Create a “things to do today” sheet. This gives the student an overview of the work expected for the day and prepare the child/adolescent in advance for any changes in daily routines
Classroom Strategy
Social Anxiety Disorder
Refusal or severe reluctance to participate in activities that will permit social scrutiny; e.g., public speaking; eating or dressing in public; social activities, such as dances; gathering in social settings, such as malls

Physical symptoms such as blushing, a shaky voice, nervousness, or sweating prior to or during social situations

Strong fear that others will notice their anxiety

Classroom Strategy
Gradual desensitization — through small group activity
Panic attack in the classroom, which can lead to a need to “escape”

Avoidance of school intense physical symptoms (e.g., shortness of breath, heart palpitations, dizziness, sweating)

Intense fear during the attack

Panic Disorder (PD)
Classroom Strategy
Have a safe place for students to go to, like a 'safe' or relaxing place where they can work though the attack
When Something’s Wrong: Strategies for teachers. Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation. 3(4), 2007.
vs.
Final thoughts, questions or concerns?!
Exit Card :
- Element of the presentation you enjoyed
- Element of the presentation that could be improved
- Area of interest within Mental Health
- Areas to explore further in future presentation
Peel District School Board,
Located at :http:/ /www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKjlxU5Zat8
Full transcript