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Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs

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by

Hana Anwar

on 15 October 2014

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Transcript of Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs

DEFINITION
Comparative
:
Form of adj. and adv. used to compare two items, people, places or ideas.
Higher degree of quality.

Superlative:
Form of adj. and adv. used to compare more than two items, people, places, or ideas. Highest degree of quality.
Adjectives Rule #1
One syllable:

Add -er for
comparative
Add -est for
superlative
Adjectives Rule #3
Adverbs Rule #4
Adjectives and Adverbs Rule #5
Let's Practice!
Adjectives Rule #2
Adjectives and Adverbs Rule #6
Irregulars: some adjectives and adverbs do not follow any of these rules.
Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs
Two Syllables:

Add
-er
or
more
(depending on the word) for
comparative

Add -est or most for
superlative

Examples:
happy,
happier
,
happiest
handsome,
more handsome
,
most handsome
Examples:

big,
bigger
,
biggest
fast,
faster
,
fastest
high,
higher
,
highest
Three or more Syllables

add
more
to
comparative
add
most
to
superlative

Examples:
Beautiful,
More beautiful
,
Most beautiful
Intelligent,
More intelligent
,
Most intelligent
With -ly endings

Add
more
for
comparative
Add
most
for
superlative
Examples:
Quickly,
more quickly
,
most quickly
Rapidly,
more rapidly
,
most rapidly
Add
less
for
comparative
Add
least
for
superlative

Examples:
Carefully,
Less
carefully
,
Least
carefully
excited,
less
excited,

least
excited
Directions:
Use 3 comparative adjectives and 3 superlative adjectives to compare the candies.
Apply at least 3 of the six different rules

Example:
The pixie sticks are
more powdery
than the candy canes. (Rule #3; comparative)
Examples:
Adjectives:
good, better, best
little, less, least
bad, worse, worst
many, more, most

Adverbs:
well, better, best
badly, worse, worst
Not all-inclusive!
Mnemonic

Oh, my adjectives, you describe a noun,
You make pictures in my mind.
You tell which one, and how many,
Also, how much and what kind.

Oh, my adjective, you have different forms.
There are three forms we should know:
Positive and comparative
But superlative tops the show.

When, my adjective, you describe one noun
Not a thing will you compare.
Positive is what we call you.
Just one image you can share.

Let’s compare two nouns. That’s comparative.
Syllables help with this chore.
With one syllable, we’ll add e-r.
With most others we’ll add more.​

Let’s compare more nouns. That’s superlative.
Three or more, you want to boast.
With one syllable, we’ll add e-s-t.
With more syllables, we’ll add most.
Full transcript